Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
TMC Collaboration
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

TMC Collaboration

1,167

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,167
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. So HowDo You Ensure Productive Collaboration?Advice from Multiplatform Professionals
  • 2. A multi-disciplinary team can be comprised ofindividuals from different work cultures and maybe disadvantaged by each not understandingenough about the role of others.Like any working relationship, a multi-disciplinaryteam needs care and attention in order to befruitful and harmonious.Screen Australia asked leaders* in the field fortheir advice on how to ensure productivecollaboration, determined via interviews withpractitioners on the frontline.
  • 3. Q uestions1 Working Collaboratively With a Different Type of Profession2 Understanding the Difference Between the Budgeting & Scheduling Processes for Linear & Transmedia Projects3 The Pros & Cons of Putting Together Your Own Team or Working With an Agency4 Common Pressure Points in the Transmedia Team5 The Benefits of a Transmedia Approach6 Type of Profession Deciding on a Native Transmedia Project or a Multiplatform Marketing Strategy7 What is Needed now to Ensure Harmonious Collaboration
  • 4. T heir advice on…Working Collaboratively With a Different Type of ProfessionChristy Dena Transmedia projects often involve professionals from different industries or artforms 1working together. Most people are skilled in a certain industry, such as film, TV, digital, or gaming. Aproducer in an industry knows the top professionals around, standardised work processes, andeverything that makes up its creative ecology. When you create projects that involve more than onemedium -- such as a feature film and a game – then the development and production process nowinvolves two different sets of industrial practices. This is what makes transmedia development andproduction hard: it involves working across silos. Not everyone is capable, or interested, in doing thissuccessfully.Nathan Anderson Some of the big things that I’m aware of when I think about the understandingthat different producers would have about traditional and emerging interactive platforms is a primarydifference around the production techniques or the expectation about completion of the project. Whenyou’re making a film or TV series you get to picture log off you deliver your project and the content isessentially complete. What interactive platforms allow us to do is have an ongoing connection with theaudience and, and that therefore means that it’s not finished and any means in fact when you release it,in fact it’s only at the beginning of the cycle in terms of its maturation and development from the creativepoint of view. So once you start interacting with the audience you then have an opportunity to optimisethe experience through further development.It’s a fundamental shift in thinking about when about what happens you produce the media withinteractive platform. You have to understand that release means the market is probably one of the firststeps you should be thinking about as opposed to one of the final steps as it is for traditional media.lisa gray Some of the issues that linear producers have when working together with transmediapeople are understanding deliverables and audience relationships. Once you deliver linear work, it isusually the end of the production for the work- with multiplatform producers, it’s only half way. This coredifference can impact deliverable expectations, budget allocation and creative execution.
  • 5. cont...Sue Maslin There is an emerging a class of digital media that have that expertise to liaise between thefilm and TV producers and the digital media companies… we had a really good talk after all that, she saidshe probably could have saved you all that of your roof but maybe half or more and we had money in thebudget for a digital producer, but as always happens in these things the first thing that goes is your lineproducer, or digital producer and then you end up doing the lot as the producer… And the but that was areally false economy in some ways.All I can tell you is that it’s happening the world over… I’ve been invited to speak at a conference inCanada, which is specifically for producers of traditional media about exactly these kind of issues aroundconvergence and trying to properly address the opportunities.Jennifer Wilson One thing I would say is that Transmedia skills delivery is about a technical skill setin digital. I look at the process of creating in your content and I don’t understand half of it…. I’m surethey’ve got more people than they need and they seem to spend ridiculous amounts of money doing stuffthat I don’t think they need to do when I know that people can make films for $16,000 and they (the linearproducers) have exactly the same view of digital. So they don’t understand what is a front developer andwhat is a backend developer and why do you have and why do you have user experience and what isinformation architecture. And so this could be a point where you just go “ you know your business, wetrust you. Trust is, for me, the big issue.  jenny lalor We have different ways of working, and unless that’s very clear upfront in the workingrelationship, it can cause significant problems further down the line. Some examples of those areproducers of TV series who produce detailed budgets with line items for everything they spend and theypretty much keep to that budget. As line items get moved around they are checked by the company.People who produce Transmedia content tender just have an overall figure with a few headings in it aboutwhere things are going to be spent, so it’s quite hard for TV producers to get their heads around wherethings are going to be spent…I actually think what happens is TV producers see a budget as a budget, that’s how much money of got,that’s what I have to make this thing for. If I have a problem I’ve got to find the money from somewherewithin that budget. Transmedia producers can’t seem to come from the point of view of “I have aguesstimate. If it costs more than that, someone else will pay for it”.You get the bill from your Transmedia producer for every change you want, unless you work out veryclearly upfront exactly what is being delivered for the money that you’re paying them and how manyiterations of that they are going to do for that money.
  • 6. Understanding the Difference Between the Budgeting &Scheduling Processes for Linear & Transmedia Projects…lisa gray When I started out in multiplatform, there was a huge difference between 2multiplatform budgets and linear budgets. As Multiplatform becomes a lot more prominent thebudget are getting bigger. If your idea is multiplatform, it is easier to access global money aswell. The biggest differences between multiplatform schedules and linear is that with linear, oncethe project is delivered- that’s it. It can’t change, and your production team finish. Withmultiplatform, once phase one is delivered, the main product can (and should) change while it islive, to further cater for your audience needs. Make sure when you are putting together yourbudgets for this that you always put money aside to respond to the audience that are engagingin your multiplatform product.jennifer WilsonFrom a production point of view, traditional producers are used to the idea that they have abudget, they will spend the budget, and at the end of the budget having been spent they willhave delivered. And in Transmedia of course, you ideally only want to spend a portion of thebudget to the point where you deliver so that you can have a lot more budget to change it and letit play out. The delivery in trans media is the start of the consumer engagement process. Deliverytakes place in two parts - there’s the development and production before you go live and thenthere’s the development and production from the point that you go alive while it’s being played.So if you have a budget it has to go to the end of both of those production cycles. Linearconcept producer as are used to the idea that the money is all spent at the end of the first one,but the point that you go live when you hand it over and people start to see what you’ve donethat’s the end of the charging process.You get people who come to you saying I want something like grand theft auto, how much isthat? And you go “about 15 million” and they really don’t have an understanding that gameshave the same price as films and they come to you expecting filmic games with narrative for theprice that you might get a $15,000 Flash installation and they want $15 million film.
  • 7. cont... 3Christy Dena A transmedia budget depends on the elements involved. If you’re creating a feature anda digital game, then the budgeting standards of each of these would be included, as well as anytransmedia roles (writer, designer, producer, consultant), and any transmedia development labour, andany costs involved with implementing asset sharing systems.jenny lalor We have different ways of working, and unless that’s very clear upfront in the workingrelationship, it can cause significant problems further down the line. Some examples of those areproducers of TV series who produce detailed budgets with line items for everything they spend and theypretty much keep to that budget. As line items get moved around the company checks them. Peoplewho produce Transmedia content tender just have an overall figure with a few headings in it about wherethings are going to be spent, so it’s quite hard for TV producers to get their heads around where thingsare going to be spent…The agencies will let you put money in the budget for those things now, but still probably not at the levelthat it needs to be. I’ve worked on shows where if you were lucky you might have a couple of hundredthousand in the budget for it, but that’s a strategy actually costs more like 500,00- 1 million. It can bereally expensive. I’ve got a show that I’m working on at the moment, where the multi-platform budget ismore than then another film I’m working on–the whole budget for the film. I think the strategy is going towork, it’s needed on this particular show, but you need someone who is prepared to fund itThe Pros & Cons of Putting Together Your Own Team orWorking With an Agency…Sue Maslin Life would be a lot easier if you just outsourced to digital natives…. but I came through thewhole philosophy of trying to enhance practice through convergence, so for that reason I’ve stuck at it, Idon’t know whether I will continue to stick at it, but for the moment I’m sticking at it, because I believethat the creative possibilities are enhanced by convergence.
  • 8. cont...There is an emerging a class of digital media that have that expertise to liaise between the film and TVproducers and the digital media companies… we had a really good talk after all that..and we had moneyin the budget for a digital producer, but as always happens in these things the first thing that goes isyour line producer, or digital producer and then you end up doing the lot as the producer..but that was areally false economy in some ways.More and more we are finding (that digital companies) are operating more and more on the servicecompany model and they are not interested in operating on what the film and TV collaborative modelhas been. That model only works in house with digital media companies and only then in a way thatmeets their business objectives.We went to 3 different Australian companies who are not interested in working with the writer-directorconceptual artist in a creative collaborative environment - what they’re wanting is a brief and scopingdocument based on that brief, they want a sign of meeting based on that brief, then they go away andcreate the work and that is the complete antithesis of the culture that is endemic to film and television inthis country.. Where you don’t just have a sign off and then get the cinematographer to go away andshould the rushes…That’s not how it works, so we had to go offshore to find a high end digital company - and Hit Lab arereally at the top of their game- that was prepared to work in a creative collaborative model and actuallyhave the writer and director in the lab and working alongside the developers, the technicians - they werephenomenal!Out of that emerged the augmented reality project that we launched at the Adelaide film Festival.In a commercial environment here in Australia, which is very very competitive, you know digital mediacompanies can earn huge amounts of money and they’re absolutely don’t have to be at the high end ofR&D and risk-taking that the creative collaboration often requires at the early stages of development.We were interested in working with companies who wanted to be part of the creative challenge… Butwhen to came to crunch time in terms of exactly how many people, how long, who you get to work withit was explained to us that this wasn’t a commercial proposition, you’ve got to fit around with whatwe’re doing commercially and the process was curtailed as a result. In each case it went back to give usa brief will go away and come back and tell you what the project is going to be.The other thing that is very common in this whole area… Is all the promises in the world, yes we can dothis and we can do this and then when you really find out what they can do, usually they can’t tell youwhat they can do, because usually you can see what they can do until they build it, then it comes backand you find that they actually didn’t know how to do it and it was trial and error for them as well.
  • 9. cont...Christy Dena 4 Transmedia should be done in-house if there are people capable executing it. If theteam is skilled in film for instance, and knows hardly anything about digital, then they should bring inprofessionals to either work on their team, or contract an agency. The decision about whetherprofessionals are brought into the production company or whether the job is outsourced is a question ofresources and goals. If the production company intends to do more than one transmedia project, thenthey need to begin the process of transforming their work culture. This means they need to bring in allthe professionals they need in-house. Whether the whole team is housed under the same roof or not,there needs to be buy-in and ownership of the transmedia vision and approach from all key personnel;and ideally at least one team-member that is ensures this happens.Lisa Gray It depends on the style of the project, and who your target audience is. At The Feds weemploy a model, which aims to get the best people on the project if they are in or out of the office. Moreimportantly to if they are based in the production office to if they are out of the office is to get themultiplatform producer engaged at development stage of the project. The earlier they are engaged, thebetter they can take advantage of how to find and keep your online audience.Common Pressure Points in the Transmedia Team…Sue Maslin We were interested in working with companies who wanted to be part of the creativechallenge… But when to came to crunch time in terms of exactly how many people, how long, who youget to work with it was explained to us that this wasn’t a commercial proposition, you’ve got to fitaround with what we’re doing commercially and the process was curtailed as a result. In each case itwent back to give us a brief will go away and come back and tell you what the project is going to be.The other thing that is very common in this whole area… Is all the promises in the world, yes we can dothis and we can do this and then when you really find out what they can do, usually they can’t tell youwhat they can do, because usually you can see what they can do until they build it, then it comes backand you find that they actually didn’t know how to do it and it was trial and error for them as well.
  • 10. cont...Jenny LalorWe have different ways of working, and unless that’s very clear upfront in the working relationship, itcan cause significant problems further down the line. Some examples of those are producers of TVseries who produce detailed budgets with line items for everything they spend and they pretty muchkeep to that budget. As line items get moved around they are checked by the company. People whoproduce Transmedia content tender just have an overall figure with a few headings in it about wherethings are going to be spent, so it’s quite hard for TV producers to get their heads around wherethings are going to be spent…Which is fine if you’re going into an all-inclusive price deal, but as projects get bigger and more moneyis spent on the stuff, it gets problematic. If I’m giving someone $1 million to produce Transmediaplatform and strategy for my film, I want to know where that million dollars is being spent. I don’texpect to get two pages saying this is the budget–a million-dollar budget is a full budget normally. That’s how we work, but it’s not how these guys work though, so I’m not saying that they should haveto conform to how we work necessarily, but there is definitely a tension there that needs to be dealtwith upfront.In television, you got a problem with the scene, you can go back relatively simply and either edit it ordigitally enhance it, reshoot some of it and fix it but in cross media there’s are certain points whereyou can’t go back and fix things without redoing the whole process. I don’t think TV producersunderstand that process, so they think half way through “oh we would really like it if the charactercame in from the left instead of the right in that scene” without realising that for them (the transmediateam) it’s not just a matter of reshooting and re-editing, it’s completely rewriting the code to enable thecharacter to come in from the other side.Quite often people don’t even do very good deliverables. You get deliverables from the Transmediaproducer and the producer goes “oh yes that’s fine”, but doesn’t go into them and find out exactlywhat they are, and at the end of their expecting something and it’s not there.It’s a completely different language and you can’t assume that just because you know the terminology,you understand the process.I think there’s a disconnect with broadcasters, with everybody saying “oh and by the way we alsoneed a trans media strategy along with the project you delivering, not taking into account what itcosts even just to get someone to build your website not even an interactive anything, you can evenafford that.
  • 11. cont...Nathan Anderson I think one of the critical issues around some of the interactive agencies outthere right now who are delivering some of this work - and they are doing a good job of it - but theyare very much thinking of this from the same point of view as a traditional media producer.If you looking at ad agencies - they create some work and they deliver it and then they don’t have anyongoing role in its management for maintenance - because it is a short term campaigns and so itmight have two three-month window and on it.Christy Dena Transmedia projects often involve professionals from different industries or artformsworking together. Most people are skilled in a certain industry, such as film, TV, digital, or gaming. Aproducer in an industry knows the top professionals around, standardised work processes, andeverything that makes up its creative ecology. When you create projects that involve more than onemedium -- such as a feature film and a game – then the development and production process nowinvolves two different sets of industrial practices. This is what makes transmedia development andproduction hard: it involves working across silos. Not everyone is capable, or interested, in doing thissuccessfully.Jenny Lalor I always give an example to people when we are having this conversation of when Iwas building my house I got a call from my builder because the frame was up and you have tochoose the colour of the roof. I said “why, is it because it’s going on this week, but there are nobreaks?” And he said, “no no it’s because the roof is on before the bricks go up”. Now not in a millionyears would you ever this have spotted that… If you didn’t know. So that’s the kind of thing thatpeople don’t understand is when things happen and the point at which you can change things andthe cost implications of changing things. So for instance in one part of the process it might be verysimple and relatively inexpensive and your Transmedia producer might be very happy to make lots ofchanges and then there’s a point after which every time anything changes it actually becomes reallytime-consuming and costs them time and money to do it.
  • 12. The Benefits of a Transmedia Approach…AT your audience. Who liked to be talked at? Also, today’s audience have plenty of “passive” 5Lisa Gray Multiplatform storytelling gives you an opportunity to talk to your audience, rather than talkentertainment to choose from, but its the entertainment the audience can interact with (ie commentson YouTube, add to their Facebook) seems to be popular- if you give your audience a chance to bepart of the storytelling, then your audience will take ownership over your content- Not only proud totalk about it but more than likely subsequently buy the “DVD” or the “T-shirt”.Nathan Anderson Another thing to bear in mind is that marketing budgets also don’t need to havea significant requirement to deliver a return on investment as long so increasing the audience for theprimary platform then they’re doing their job then the requirement to return any kind of revenue isn’tthere.Producers should understand that a well executed Transmedia plan should contribute to your regularlyand not really drain on your production budget.  So it’s not about thinking of this as another mouth to feed necessarily, but it’s about thinking of this asanother market that can be exploited for your IP.Traditional media producers if they want to simplify the whole Transmedia process is to think about itas story it’s not about anything more complex than that. In the same way that a great story leads to agreat media project when it is executed properly essentially it’s the same thing. So it’s just thinkingabout from the raw idea, what is a story about and how can it be leveraged and realised across asmany touch points as possible. If they can keep that in mind then it becomes potentially a lessdaunting prospect because it’s not necessarily a language that traditional media producers aren’tfamiliar with–story is key to developing a good property.Really Transmedia is not changing that anyway it’s still about the story, in fact it’s more about the storythan ever and the technical execution of that is about finding the right people to help you with butreally it should always be true to the story and good Transmedia properties do that. It’s not abouttechnical wizardry it’s about story.
  • 13. cont... 6Jenny Lalor Plus remembering that cross-platform should never be done just for the sake of it, youshouldn’t be doing it just because everyone’s doing it. People think “Ooh, I have to have a website”so they build a website and it’s got the character names and what they do, who they are andstorylines about them, but people don’t think about using the medium to actually drive an audience tothe TV, because at the end of the day, TV producers are funded by networks, and the networks aredriven by ratings.Christy Dena I have found short-cutting the why should we do this, and going straight to how youdo it, inspires more people to delve into the area. Getting writers, designers, producers and directorsto share their stories on the creative challenges they faced and how they’re expressing themselves viathis combination of media, attracts the kind of professionals who will do something meaningful with it.Type of Profession Deciding on a Native TransmediaProject or a Multiplatform Marketing Strategy…Nathan AndersonWhen you look at it from a marketing point of view it’s definitely about creating an outcome, so it’ssaying let’s create an interactive extension for the property and we will call the “transmedia”because the audience can get involved. Where is its most powerful I think when it’s about theprocess from day one that gives an audience richer experience.
  • 14. cont...Christy Dena A “transmedia native” project is one that is designed to be transmedia from thebeginning. It doesn’t mean it is implemented as transmedia in the beginning as each element may taketime to secure finance. A non-native transmedia project describes single-medium projects that haveother elements added later. For instance, a feature film is written to be entirely self-contained and thena game is added. This approach virtually never works because there are stories/experiences that aresuitable for a transmedia implementation and ones that are not. A transmedia writer, for instance,thinks episodically because the story does not end at the end of the film, novel or episode.When people say a transmedia project is just marketing, they’re usually referring to the “other” contentbeing created for promotional reasons only. A transmedia project is one in which all of the elements inall of the media contribute equally to the meaning-making process. If something is purely promotional,it really isn’t intended to contribute to the story at all. In the past, the majority of content created inother media was purely for economic reasons. TV shows, novels, games, and so on were all createdto leverage an appealing property for financial gain. Quality control ran as far as a visual style guideand that is about it because the original creators saw all these additional elements as exterior to themain story. You can have marketing projects that are transmedia: an alternate reality gamecommissioned to help promote a film for instance. Such projects can be transmedia-native,meaningful and marketing.Jennifer Wilson So to me, the best things happen when it starts up early. You are making a pieceof screen content, you start off with the Transmedia produces in the beginning, and you talk aboutwhat could happen and how it’s going to work. We’ve got that with the broadcaster at the moment -we got involved with them at the script stage and so we were able to throw some things into the scriptthat work for what we are going to do in the Transmedia space - about the multiple stories. When theystart filming, we will probably start telling them about some of the things we want filmed that will workfor what we want and will probably start putting up some little elements of games, some little elementsof story or we will start writing the blogs of some of the characters that are assisting in our Transmediaexperience and they will go out. They will be out in the public domain for people to explore. So theyclearly have a marketing role, but they clearly have a story role too. And so for me the best thing iswhere it matches together. If you start your Transmedia at the right time it can influence the linearstory. It creates rabbit holes for people to discover… So we have rabbit holes on you chewed, wehave rabbit holes on a game site we have a rabbit hole in a bunch of blogs. So those sorts of rabbitholes where people go “oh that’s interesting, where does that go to?”  So that for me is where it’sideal.
  • 15. What is Needed now to Ensure Harmonious Collaboration… 7Lisa Gray I was a linear producer and now I am a multiplatform producer. Quite honestly, both stylesproducers have to make good stories with to the highest quality achievable- its just how the content isconsumed by the audience its different. A linear producers relationship with it’s audience is passive,whereas a mulitplatform producers relationship with its audience is interactive.  From my perspective, Ithink we just have to remember that its all just different ways to tell stories for our audience.I often see the first mistake linear producers make when they want to make their first multiplatformconcept is use tools that they think will make it work rather than researching if their target audience isactually “using” that tool.Don’t just push to make something a console or an APP because it is the trendy. Research youraudience and how they like to be entertained. Also, really plan your content rollout. Make sure that youare not just delivering your content to its audience the same time the linear is delivered- too much can beoverwhelming for an audience, and it will loose its impact.Christy Dena There are hardly any transmedia producers in Australia, and even then they may not beskilled in the combination of artforms you’re working in. Therefore, there needs to be improvedcommunication and mutual understanding between writers, designers, producers, and directors, indifferent industries. At present, the gaming industry is quite isolated from the film, TV, digital, andpublishing industries. The more industry events that encourage cross-fertilisation would be beneficial. Agood transmedia producer (writer, designer, director), is familiar with the processes of more than oneindustry. They understand the different jargon, artistic and economic goals, processes, people and howto facilitate getting the best of everyone. In the end, no matter what tools, jargon and processesemployed, true professionals connect at the same level: a passion for good characters, conflicts,journeys, artistic design, moving your audience/players, and rewarding production processes.
  • 16. cont...Nathan Anderson What interactive platforms allow us to do is have an ongoing connection with theaudience and, and that therefore means that it’s not finished and any means in fact when you releaseit, in fact it’s only at the beginning of the cycle in terms of its maturation and development from thecreative point of view. So once you start interacting with the audience you then have an opportunity tooptimise the experience through further development.It’s a fundamental shift in thinking about when about what happens you produce the media withinteractive platform. You have to understand that release means the market is probably one of the firststeps you should be thinking about as opposed to one of the final steps as it is for traditional media.Lisa Gray There is a very bare essential multiplatform workflow-1) Idea2) Decide target Audience and then decide on platform choices.3) Select Technical partners and scope (make sure you get the best people on the job)4) Full strategy and rollout5) Finalise budget and timelines (make sure include $$ for moderator and adjustment to react to howyour audience plays with your content).6) Build (the workflow of this component depends on your finance strategy)7) Release of Phase 1- develop phase 2 and assets8) Analysis and decision making for phase 29) Launch phase 2  or shut down- depending on its success.
  • 17. T he leaderschristy dena is the Director of Universe Creation 101 - a company whereshe is developing her own creative projects and entertainment services, aswell as consulting on cross/transmedia projects. She is currently developingan unusual online comedy drama called AUTHENTIC IN ALL CAPS. Shepresents and runs workshops worldwide on transmedia writing and design.She’s written a PhD on transmedia practice, and she sometimes blogs warstories at YouSuckatTransmedia.com.Nathan Anderson started his adult life in the film and TV industryculminating with a career changing experience working on The Matrix. Intandem, the rise of the internet led Nathan to work in the online media spacefor the last 12 years in executive roles at dotcoms, software development,media organisations and advertising agencies.Combined with a lifelong loveof computer games, Nathan draws on all these experiences and passion tohead up Envelop Entertainment. Nathan graduated from the prestigious,Australian Film Television and Radio School, with a Masters by Research in2010, examining the nature of interactive narrative and storytelling. Nathannow lectures in transmedia and multiplatform at AFTRS as part of theirGraduate Diploma and Masters programs.Sue Maslin is an award winning screen producer with credits includingthe feature films ROAD TO NHILL (1997), winner of Best Film at theThessaloniki International Film Festival and JAPANESE STORY (2003)winner of 26 international awards including Best Film at the AustralianFilm Institute Awards, Best Film at IF Showtime Awards and Best Film atFilm Critics Circle of Australia.
  • 18. cont...Jennifer Wilson As one of the Directors, Jennifer Wilson is one ofthe vital cogs in the machine that is The Project Factory. With morethan 20 years experience in interactive media, her previous postsinclude MD of HWW, Head of Innovation for ninemsn and principle ofboutique consultancy, Lean Forward. Jen brings a zeal for device-independent relationships with consumers, storytelling across multipleplatforms and a passion for all things mobile. Jen chairs the MobileIndustry Group for AIMIA and is on the Council of the ScreenProducers Association of Australia.Jenny Lalor has been working in legal and business affairs in filmand television for more years than she cares to admit.  Whilst living inLondon between 1990 and 2000, she worked for the BBC, CarltonTelevision and Tiger Aspect Productions (including on Billy Elliot andThe Animated Mr. Bean).  Since returning to Melbourne in 2000 shehas worked on a variety of film and television projects, includingJindabyne, Coffin Rock, CJ The DJ, Saddle Club 3, RocKwiz, Wilfredand Lonely Planet’s travel shows.  She now has her own practicespecializing in entertainment law and provides executive producingservices on a range of children’s projects.   She recently executiveproduced the pre-school animation series “DirtGirlWorld”, co-produced by dirtgirlworld Productions and Decode Entertainment forthe ABC, BBC and CBC.lisa gray is the Head of Content at The Feds and has been working inMedia Production for over 12 years. She has been a guest speaker onBranded Entertainment and Interactive Media at SPAA and Mumbrella360, has also been a guest lecturer at AFTRS on Multiplatform Mediaand is a regular lecturer at Metro Screen NSW. Most recently Lisahelmed The Feds’ award winning Interactive TV show Stay Tuned withABC3 and is currently developing several new TV formats and brandedmultiplatform projects.
  • 19. Get in Touch contactus TMC Resource Kit info@tmcresourcekit.com tmcresourcekit.comSo HowDo You Ensure Productive Collaboration? was prepared by: screen australia www.screenaustralia.gov.au/
  • 20. tmcrkpartnersTHANKS to...
  • 21. ’So HowDo You Ensure Productive Collaboration?’ wasgenerously developed & shared with TMC.This document retains all rights and permissionsas set out by Screen Australia.

×