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Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
Wki Mataphors
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Wki Mataphors

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Slides from Katy Campbell's Ways of Knowing presentation at TLt 2009 in Saskatoon. …

Slides from Katy Campbell's Ways of Knowing presentation at TLt 2009 in Saskatoon.

http://www.tlt2009.ca/all-sessions/ways-of-knowing-i-designers-pedagogical-content-knowledge-me.html

Narrative inquiry gives us a way to explore and share our understandings of the cultural community of instructional design. This session synthesizes the results of a set of research studies about instructional designers' identity development and implications for their practice. For example, most instructional designers in postsecondary education have relevant graduate credentials. However, their undergraduate degrees may vary widely. The concept of pedagogical content knowledge recognizes that disciplines differ in regard to their concepts, logical structure, truth claims, and inquiry approaches (Donald, 2002; Shulman, 1986; 1987). Thus, disciplinary background might play an important role in an instructional designer's discipline-based formation of Self, from which they may devise their purpose, or agency, and related ID strategies (c.f. Schwier, Campbell & Kenny, 2007). Together with session participants I will explore PCK, and/or ways of knowing, through the metaphors revealed in over thirty instructional design narratives.

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Ways of Knowing I: Designers PCK and Design Metaphor Katy Campbell, PhD University of Alberta
    • 2. Why study instructional designers disciplinary formation? <ul><li>Employment of instructional designers within the postsecondary sector is growing </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional designers play an important role in shaping the learning experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced instructional designers develop a tacit understanding of instructional design across the disciplines </li></ul>
    • 3. Significance <ul><li>Gaining an understanding of how instructional designers develop their disciplinary understandings: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provide insights on transitioning between disciplines </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improve acceptance within the disciplines </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 4. Framing the study <ul><li>This study relies on two theoretical constructs: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Disciplinary-based pedagogical content knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agency of the instructional designer (agentic model) </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Data collection and analysis <ul><li>Data collection: </li></ul><ul><li>Open-ended questions </li></ul><ul><li>Six purposively selected instructional designers </li></ul><ul><li>Written recording / memo writing </li></ul><ul><li>Member checks </li></ul>
    • 6. Emerging ideas <ul><li>Experiences converged around a critical incident </li></ul><ul><li>Enduring preference to work within their own disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Disciplinary understandings contribute to (cultural) identity formation </li></ul>
    • 7. Culture defined… <ul><li>Culture finds expression “in learned, shared and inherited values, in the beliefs, norms and life practices of a certain group, guiding their processes of thinking, decision-making and action.” </li></ul><ul><li>Suominen, Krovasin, and Ketola (1997) </li></ul>
    • 8. Culture and Identity <ul><li>shared language and symbols </li></ul><ul><li>windows into shared aesthetics </li></ul><ul><li>fluidity </li></ul>
    • 9. Ways of knowing and seeing <ul><li>shortcuts to understanding, </li></ul><ul><li>deep-rootedness of metaphor in culture, </li></ul><ul><li>sensory-emotional associations </li></ul><ul><li>new perceptions, </li></ul><ul><li>creating communities with shared meaning; </li></ul><ul><li>but excluding others </li></ul>
    • 10. PCK and Metaphor <ul><li>Schools of thought in social science, those communities of theorists subscribing to relatively coherent perspectives, are based upon the acceptance and use of different kinds of metaphor as a foundation for inquiry. </li></ul><ul><li>Morgan, 1980 </li></ul>
    • 11. An intimate community <ul><li>A principal ambition in the use of metaphor…is to induce others to feel as we do, and to do this by describing the objects of our feelings in a way which requires a special effort at comprehension on the part of others. When I offer you a metaphor I invite your attempt to join a community with me, an intimate community whose bond is our common feeling about something. </li></ul><ul><li>Cohen, 1997 </li></ul>
    • 12. Metaphors shape thought <ul><li>represent cognitive and perceptual features </li></ul><ul><li>express facets not easily described </li></ul><ul><li>vivid and memorable images </li></ul>
    • 13. Examples of metaphor <ul><li>Teaching as improvisational performance </li></ul><ul><li>Pastor as shepherd (of a flock) </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate supervision as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>walking on a rackety bridge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>a fiduciary relationship </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adult educator as adventure guide </li></ul><ul><li>Nurse as advocate </li></ul><ul><li>the desktop </li></ul><ul><li>Designer as blue collar worker </li></ul>
    • 14. Cultural myths and metaphors <ul><li>Far from being a mere rhetorical flourish, floating on the surface of proper argument, metaphor and workings of language are actually responsible for the appearance of truth…in discourse. </li></ul><ul><li>Potter (1996) </li></ul><ul><li>How does metaphor relate to myth? </li></ul>
    • 15. Grand narratives <ul><li>sacred stories </li></ul><ul><li>cover stories </li></ul><ul><li>secret stories </li></ul>
    • 16. Metaphors and Myths of ID <ul><li>Design as craft </li></ul><ul><li>Design as agency </li></ul><ul><li>Design as connoisseurship </li></ul>
    • 17. From designers’ narratives <ul><li>Designers as provocateurs </li></ul><ul><li>Designers as gardeners </li></ul><ul><li>Designers as social entrepreneurs </li></ul><ul><li>Designers as project managers </li></ul><ul><li>Designers as cooks (short-order, gourmet) </li></ul><ul><li>Design as subversive activity </li></ul>
    • 18. Selected references <ul><li>Cohen, T. (1997). Metaphor, feeling, and narrative. Philosophy and Literature, 21 (2), 223-244. </li></ul><ul><li>Clandinin, D.J. &amp; Connelly, F.M. (1995). Teachers’ professional knowledge landscape. New York: Teachers College Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Ereaut, G. (2002). Analyzing and interpretation in qualitative market research . London: Sage, </li></ul><ul><li>Fenwick, T.J. (2000). Adventure guides, outfitters, firestarters and caregivers: Continuing Educators’ images of identity. Canadian Journal of University Continuing Education, 26 (1), 53-77. </li></ul><ul><li>MacKinnon, J. (2004). Academic supervision: seeking metaphors and models for quality. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 28(4), 395-405 . </li></ul>
    • 19. <ul><li>Morgan, G. (1980). Paradigms, metaphors and puzzle solving in organization theory. Administrative Science Quarterly, 25 , 605-622 . </li></ul><ul><li>Suominen, T., Krovasin, M., &amp; Ketola, O. (1997). Nursing culture: Some viewpoints. Journal of Advanced Nursing , 25 , 186-190. </li></ul>
    • 20. Want to participate? [email_address]

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