TEDxCLE 2010 - Chris Yanc

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TEDxCLE: Chris Yanc "Open Source Technology and Multi-touch Exploration"

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TEDxCLE 2010 - Chris Yanc

  1. 2. cyancdesign
  2. 7. DIY
  3. 8. DIY <ul><li>from wikipedia:  </li></ul><ul><li>The DIY scene of today is actually a re-introduction (often to urban and suburban dwellers) of the old pattern of personal involvement in home or apartment upkeep, making clothes, maintenance of cars, computers, websites, or any material aspect of living. A comment by philosopher Alan Watts (from the &quot;Houseboat Summit&quot; panel discussion in a 1967 edition of the San Francisco Oracle ) reflected a growing sentiment of that time: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Our educational system, in its entirety, does nothing to give us any kind of material competence. In other words, we don't learn how to cook, how to make clothes, how to build houses, how to make love, or to do any of the absolutely fundamental things of life. The whole education that we get for our children in school is entirely in terms of abstractions. It trains you to be an insurance salesman or a bureaucrat, or some kind of cerebral character. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In response to this sort of insight, in the 1970s, DIY spread through the North American population of college- and recent-college-graduate age groups. In part, this movement involved simply the renovation of affordable, rundown older homes. But it also related, to some extent, to various projects expressing the social and environmental vision of the '60s and early 1970s. A young American visionary named Stewart Brand, working with friends and family, and initially using the most basic of typesetting and page-layout tools, published the first edition of The Whole Earth Catalog (subtitled Access to Tools ) in late 1968. </li></ul><ul><li>The first Catalog and its successors used a broad definition of the term &quot;tools&quot;. There were informational tools, such as books (often technical in nature), professional journals, courses, classes, and the like. And there were specialized, designed items, such as carpenter's and mason's tools, garden tools, welding equipment, chainsaws, fiberglass materials, etc. — even early personal computers. (The designer J. Baldwin acted as editor for the inclusion of these items, writing many of the reviews himself.) The Catalog' s publication both emerged from and spurred the great wave of experimentalism, convention-breaking, and do-it-yourself attitude of the late 1960s. Often copied, the Catalog appealed to a wide cross-section of people in North America and had a broad influence. </li></ul><ul><li>For decades, magazines such as Popular Mechanics and Mechanix Illustrated offered a way to keep current on useful information. DIY home improvement books began to flourish in the 1970s, first created as compendiums of magazine articles. One of the earliest extensive lines of DIY how-to books was created by Sunset Books, based upon articles derived from the pages of Sunset Magazine in California. Time-Life, Better Homes & Gardens, and other publishers soon followed suit. In the mid-1990s, DIY home-improvement content began to find its way onto the World Wide Web. HouseNet was the earliest bulletin-board style site where users could share information. HomeTips.com, established in early 1995, was among the first Web-based sites to deliver free extensive DIY home-improvement content created by expert authors to Internet users. Since the late 1990s, DIY has exploded on the Web through thousands of sites. </li></ul><ul><li>In the 1970s, when home video (VCRs) came along, the potentials in demonstrating processes audio-visually were immediately grasped by DIY instructors. In 1979, This Old House starring Bob Vila premiered on PBS and started the DIY television revolution. The show was immensely popular and helped grow the DIY industry by educating people on how to improve their living conditions (and the value of their house) without the expense of paying someone to do it. In 1994, the HGTV Network cable television channel was launched in the United States and Canada, followed in 1999 by the DIY Network cable television channel. Both were launched to appeal to the growing percentage of North Americans interested in DIY topics, from home improvement to knitting. Such channels have multiple shows showing how to stretch one's budget to achieve professional-looking results (&quot;Design Cents&quot;, &quot;Design on a Dime&quot;, etc.) while doing the work yourself. </li></ul><ul><li>Beyond magazines and television the scope of home improvement DIY continues to grow online where most mainstream media outlets now have extensive DIY focused informational websites such as This Old House, Martha Stewart, and the DIY Network that are often extensions of their magazine or television brand. The growth of independent online DIY resources is also spiking[1] and the number of homeowners who blog about their own experiences continues to grow along with Do-It-Yourself websites from smaller organizations. </li></ul>
  4. 9. DIY Do It Youself
  5. 10. Open Source
  6. 11. Open Source developing software and providing the underlying source code to create  a fully transparent process...
  7. 12. Open Source ...except this idea of transparency  does not only have to pertain to  software
  8. 14. Arduino: Open Source Processor
  9. 15. What Else?!
  10. 16. What Else?! The Aurora 224  
  11. 17. What Else?! The Aurora 224 RepRap
  12. 18. What Else?! The Aurora 224 RepRap OScar
  13. 19. What Else?! The Aurora 224 RepRap OScar Ligeti Stratos
  14. 20. What Else?! The Aurora 224 RepRap OScar Ligeti Stratos The Open Prosthetics Project 
  15. 21. What Else?! The Aurora 224 RepRap OScar Ligeti Stratos The Open Prosthetics Project  and more.............
  16. 22. Why?
  17. 23. Why? Power in Numbers
  18. 24. Why? Power in Numbers Support Community (not a call center)
  19. 25. Why? Power in Numbers Support Community (not a call center) Flexibility & Expandability
  20. 26. Why? Power in Numbers Support Community (not a call center) Flexibility & Expandability Lower Cost
  21. 27. Why? Power in Numbers Support Community (not a call center) Flexibility & Expandability Lower Cost Stop Vendor Lock-in
  22. 28. Why? Innovation doesn't have to  only start in one place.
  23. 29. Why? Innovation doesn't have to  only start in one place. It can become a global movement at a more rapid pace
  24. 36. Ready for Tracking
  25. 37. Community Core Vision
  26. 41. MS Surface $12,000 to $15,000 DIY & Open $2,000 to $50
  27. 42. Open Source Not Without its Own Problems
  28. 43. Open Source Not Without its Own Problems Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen
  29. 44. Open Source Not Without its Own Problems Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen No More 'Trade Secrets'
  30. 45. Open Source Not Without its Own Problems Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen No More 'Trade Secrets' Limited Support in smaller communities
  31. 46. Open Source Not Without its Own Problems Too Many Cooks in the Kitchen No More 'Trade Secrets' Limited Support in smaller communities Ownership and Copyright Laws
  32. 48. happy experimenting (^_^)//

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