• Like
  • Save
TEDxBaltimore 2013 - Speaker Manual
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

TEDxBaltimore 2013 - Speaker Manual

on

  • 378 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
378
Views on SlideShare
378
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    TEDxBaltimore 2013 - Speaker Manual TEDxBaltimore 2013 - Speaker Manual Document Transcript

    •          TEDxBaltimore  x = independently organized TED event                                    SPEAKER MANUAL    Read these important pointers. We want you to give a breathtaking talk!          TEDxBaltimore / January 25, 2013 / Morgan State University / tedxbaltimore.com 
    • TEDxBaltimore will be held on Friday January 25, 2013 from 9am – 5pm  Location:  Morgan State University  Murphy Fine Arts Center (map)  2201 Argonne Drive  Baltimore, MD 21251  Rehearsals will take place on Thursday January 24, 2013 at the venue  YOUR TALK  >> Should be directed at a smart general audience (avoid industry jargon)   >> Should focus on one unique aspect of your story (dont try to cover too much)  >> CANNOT be a sales pitch (absolutely no corporate plugs!)  >> You may use slides or video to augment your talk. Do not depend on your  slides/video to convey everything  TELL A STORY. Be passionate. Make the audience laugh. Make them cry. Make them feel what you feel. Hand gestures, movements, demonstrations, and the pitch of your voice all contribute to the atmosphere that you want to convey  MULTIMEDIA  >> You must submit slides/video to us by Friday January 18, 2013. Otherwise, we cannot guarantee you’ll be able to use them  >> We only accept presentations in PowerPoint or Keynote format, videos in mp4 format or DVD. Do not send us .pdf files, image files, or prezi links  >> When creating your slides: use a 16:9 aspect ratio (Powerpoint) or 1280x720 or higher resolution (Keynote)  >> Use a sans‐serif font (such as Helvetica) it is easier to read from a distance  >> To avoid last‐minute glitches with your presentation onsite, font files should be embedded in your presentation file.  TEDxBaltimore / January 25, 2013 / Morgan State University / tedxbaltimore.com 
    • >> Use a dark background color. White or light colors project a very bright light in the background and distract (audience won’t focus on you!) and you will be a lot harder to photograph  >> Less is more. Don’t cram too much on each slide. General rule of thumb: 2 slides per minute  >> You must properly license all images for TED’s use in worldwide video and web distribution. Don’t grab images from the web unless they are clearly licensed under Creative Commons for use.  THE THEME TEDxBaltimore: Re‐wired  Baltimore has strong historical roots as an engine of growth which played a key role in the emergence of America as a global leader. Today, innovation and entrepreneurship are transforming the city and the world. New leaders and innovative thinkers are using bold ideas and emerging technologies to reshape the city and the region as a cornerstone for the New Economy.  The future of Baltimore is Re‐Wired, and TEDxBaltimore is a forum for identifying, discussing, and building its foundation.  >> Read the theme then forget it  >> Please do not explicitly address this theme. Reflect on the concept, and then try to bury it deep within the framework of your talk  WORDS OF WISDOM  >> Show us the real you. Share your passions, your dreams... and also your fears. Be vulnerable. Speak of failure as well as of success   >> Make the complex plain. Don’t try to dazzle intellectually. Don’t speak in abstractions. Explain! Give examples. Tell stories. Be specific. While TED speakers are often acknowledged experts in their field, TED talks shine when they can explain important concepts to a bright but cross‐disciplinary audience  >> Connect with people’s emotions. Make us laugh! Make us cry!  >> Don’t flaunt your ego. Don’t boast. It’s the surest way to switch everyone off  TEDxBaltimore / January 25, 2013 / Morgan State University / tedxbaltimore.com 
    • >> No selling from the stage! Unless we have specifically asked you to, do not talk about your company or your organization. And don’t even think about pitching your products or services or asking for funding from the stage  >> Feel free to comment on other speakers, to praise or criticize. Controversy energizes! Enthusiastic endorsement is powerful!  >> If possible, do not read your talk. Notes are fine. But if the choice is between reading or rambling, then read  >> You must end your talk on time. Otherwise you steal time from the speakers that follow you  TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL Reaching Presentation Nirvana  Great TED Talks  These are some TED talks we find absolutely amazing both in their content and delivery. Use them as sources of inspiration to craft your own talk:   • Luis von Ahn at TEDxCMU  • Ken Robinson at TED2006  • Robert Ballard at TED2008  • Anthony Atala at TED2011  • Charles Limb at TEDMED and  • Erica Frenkel at TEDxMidAtlantic  TEDxMidAtlantic    Resources   • “10 Ways to Prepare for a TED Talk” (link)   • Thoughts from an attendee:   o The bar for TED Talks is that someone gets on the stage and says  “look at this interesting stuff I’m doing”  o The talks I talk about all week are the ones where the person gets  on the stage and says “look at this interesting stuff I’m doing and  here’s why I’m passionate about it”  o The talks I’ll talk about all year are the ones where the person gets  up there and says “look at this interesting stuff I’m doing and here’s  why I’m passionate about it AND here’s why you should care about it”   • Your TEDxBaltimore organizers— they are experienced TEDx’sters who  want you to succeed! TEDxBaltimore / January 25, 2013 / Morgan State University / tedxbaltimore.com 
    • How To Give A Terrible TED Talk Advice from TED Curator Chris Anderson on what NOT to do   • Take a long time to get started, chatter away  • Slow down and pompously orate  • Make sure everyone knows how important you are  • Keep referring back to your brilliant book  • Use abstract language and lofty concepts. Provide no concrete detail. Exhibit  faux intellectualism  • Who needs substance? Just inspire!”   • No need to build an argument and persuade the audience  • Are you an artist or architect? Sound as intellectual as possible. Don’t bother  showing us your work  • Don’t waste time telling stories  • Use pseudo–scientific jargon to beef up your talk   • Copy your visuals off the Web  • Be very serious. Humor is a distraction  • Slip in some snarky political comments  • Give lots of info on the history and structure of your organization  • Cram in every single aspect of your work.  • Don’t bother rehearsing for time  • Wing it  • Memorize 90 percent of your talk. Visibly stress out during the remaining 10  percent  • Read your talk off the confidence monitor  • Avoid eye contact with the audience  • “Crack the TED formula” for a great talk and copy it  • Don’t risk being true to you  • Manipulate audience emotions  • Use a gratuitous picture of a family member  • Talk fast to cram more in  • Make a subtle funding pitch  WE’RE HERE TO HELP  The organizers of TEDxBaltimore are veteran TEDx’sters who know the essence of a great TEDx talk. Feel free to bounce ideas off of us. Need to practice your talk? Need a design consult? We’re here to help you!  Jen Gunner  Sarge Salman jgunner@greaterbaltimore.org   sargesalman@gmail.com   TEDxBaltimore / January 25, 2013 / Morgan State University / tedxbaltimore.com