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TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point
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TCI 2013 Regional smart specialization realities from an issues stand point

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By Anna Ntinidou, Open Arena 5, LU Open, Lund University, Sweden, presented at the 16th TCI Global Conference, Kolding 2013.

By Anna Ntinidou, Open Arena 5, LU Open, Lund University, Sweden, presented at the 16th TCI Global Conference, Kolding 2013.

Published in: Business, Technology
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  • The term “smart specialisation” has been launched at EU level to emphasise the importance of basing prioritisations in innovation strategies and subsequent initiatives on a fundamental analysis of the requirements for future competitiveness at all political levels. Focus is also on regional players’ participation in strategy development. In line with this challenge, in recent years Skåne has conducted a situation analysis of the structure of its economy in cooperation with regional players with responsibility for supporting companies and individuals in developing innovations. This analysis and cooperation have since formed the basis for developing an innovation strategy for Skåne.The cluster phenomenon is based on focusing knowledge within individual categories. Clusters have many benefits, including cost savings resulting from collaborative purchasing, but clusters can only achieve their objectives when companies begin creating value for each other by collaborating. The vision and strategy for development of open innovation arenas will be seen as a sub-strategy for the overall innovation strategy for Skåne. The intention is also that it will function as a framework for existing cluster initiatives to relate to in developing open innovation arenas up to 2020.
  • The term “smart specialisation” has been launched at EU level to emphasise the importance of basing prioritisations in innovation strategies and subsequent initiatives on a fundamental analysis of the requirements for future competitiveness at all political levels. Focus is also on regional players’ participation in strategy development. In line with this challenge, in recent years Skåne has conducted a situation analysis of the structure of its economy in cooperation with regional players with responsibility for supporting companies and individuals in developing innovations. This analysis and cooperation have since formed the basis for developing an innovation strategy for Skåne.The cluster phenomenon is based on focusing knowledge within individual categories. Clusters have many benefits, including cost savings resulting from collaborative purchasing, but clusters can only achieve their objectives when companies begin creating value for each other by collaborating.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Regional Smart specialization realities from an Issues stand point Anna Ntididou Cluster lab: Competence driven vs. issue driven smart specialization and impact result 4 september 2013
    • 2. @ 16th TCI Annual Global Conference 3-6 September 2013, Kolding, Denmark Regional Smart specialization realities from an Issues stand point How can open Innovation processes speed up impact & results?
    • 3.  Skåne • Area: 10 939 km2 • Population: 1 243 329 • Density: 112.8/km2
    • 4.  Knowledge Key to Innovation :To increase the impact of university research and knowledge  Joint initiative between the higher education institutions in the counties of Skåne and Blekinge (2011–2013)  Catalyst for cooperation in the Regional Innovation System  Effectiveness and coordination of efforts  Synergistic effect in interdisciplinary cooperation  Focus  Challenges – needs driven innovation  Open Innovation principles & processes
    • 5.  “smart specialisation” - launched at EU level to emphasise the importance of basing prioritisations in innovation strategies and subsequent initiatives on a fundamental analysis of the requirements for future competitiveness at all political levels. Focus is also on regional players’ participation in strategy development.  Open Arena 5 : Synergy with and contribution to  STRATEGY 2020: An International Innovation Strategy for Skåne  ‘smart personal health’, ‘smart sustainable cities’, ‘smart materials’  Developing new innovative areas and creative environments  Sub-strategy: From cluster initiatives to the development of open innovation arenas in Skåne
    • 6.  Aims  To increase the impact of university research and knowledge  To strengthen the innovative capacity in the region through the increase of utilisation of university research  To develop and test new methods and tools to this end  To establish an open collaboration arena/platform in the region between academia-society-business  Thematic areas  Smart Cities  Food  Environment  Personal Health  ICT as a catalyst Sustainability as a horizontal thematic
    • 7.  Implementation:  Project Leader: LU Open  Joint Learning and capturing of lessons learned  Pilots - interdisciplinary innovation arenas to test new methods and tools- new methodologies for collaboration models 1. Green Development - ORIGO (SLU Alnarp) 2. Food, Environment & Health - Open Innovation Arena (HKR) 3. Prototyping the Future - ICT Tools for Innovation (MAH) 4. IT and Internet-based solutions within Health & Smart Cities (BTH) 5. Bridging Academia & Knowledge (LU Innovation System)
    • 8. one unique team Academic intrapreneur SME/Public sectorTeamleader Business advisor Expert Scentific researcher
    • 9. Academic intrapreneur An innovation model SME/Public sectorScentific researcher Research result Product/service
    • 10. one team - # milestones  Risk management as a particularly crucial aspect  Milestones focused on commercial product development  Time to market effectiveness  Increased potential to involve SMEs
    • 11. University Researcher Origo modelPhD Intrapreneur Risk management Research based product development Academic material Research results Market potential Commercial product development Innovation Origo 2012/ SLU; Kristina Santén, Patrik Stolt, LU;Helena Ljusberg Industry Public sector  Risk management as a particularly crucial aspect  Time to market effectiveness  Increased competitiveness  Commercial product development  Increased potential to involve SMEs
    • 12. Project formulated by challenges and needs Project created and changed according to needs Project that fails Project that achieves commercialisation or implementation in a business environment iterative processes Challenge Challenge External/Internal Knowledge and Insight Collaborative Methods & Tools OPEN INNOVATION PROCESS HKR & KRINOVA Open Innovation Arena Model key aspects:  nature in challenge driven innovation  interdisciplinary teamwork and knowledge complementarity  triple-helix collaborative effort and insight, including participatory processes  early fail aspect, crucial for level of investment  efficiency and time to implementation
    • 13. WORKSHOPS - Coopetitions WORKSHOPS Identification and definition of challenge and problem WHAT EXISTS? INSIGHTS? Current knowledge level and competence Available solutions and companies Research, Project result and Societal Challenges Insight Assignment Formulation Invitation to researchers, compa nies,public sector identified project- embryo DESIGNPROCESSES - Translation and metaphors - Team prototyping Testbed- Assignment formulation CROWD SOURCING - Development From Challenge to Idea to Innovation An iterativ innovation process Support from innovation actors in ecosystem
    • 14. From Challenge to Idea to Innovation An iterativ innovation process Prof of Concept INNOVATION - Commercialisation - Beta launch PITCH Unique and valuable new: - Process - Concept - Product/service
    • 15. BTH Model Cases coming from researchers (push) and the industry (pull) Students Pilot Leader Workshops: Researchers fertilize the industry ideas Academy Students: Product/prototype tests The link between the industry and the academy, identifying cases, creating workshops, business development, attract commercial partners Proof of Concept Proof of Concept: Business development & prototyping Industry Workshops: The industry fertilizes the researchers ideas
    • 16. . Modell 2:  Prototyping the Future Model Key aspects: Fast failure IPR not crucial
    • 17. LU Innovation System Pilot: Bridging Academia & Knowledge Making knowledge available to business in life science • MAX lab infrastructure mostly used by university researchers • Goal:  To make infrastructure available to life science industry  To stimulate increased usage of facilities • Effect:  Competence development together with industy  Facilities as a resource for product development  Increase of international attractiveness of the region • Key aspect: Facilitator function
    • 18.  Lessons learned until now • Systems innovation is a top‐to‐bottom attitude for policy‐makers, universities, industry, customers and users. This is the spirit of Open Innovation Arenas in theory.  Reality: It takes time and bottom-up efforts to change processes but challenge driven processes speed up impact • Regional “smart specialisation” priorities are successful in streamlining regional efforts between innovation players since these are based in the analysis of the cluster realities and competencies in the region. • Open Arena 5 avoided dread-lock through a bottom-up approach that respected the needs of the actors in the innovation system and moved slowly towards new open innovation models as a first step toward integration of university efforts in the region. • Key aspect: Intermediary function • Issues and challenge driven open innovation processes speed up impact & results since they showcase reality and success & failure stories, contribute therefore in changing established practices.

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