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2012 London Olympics and beyond

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What happens after any Olympics Games business-wise? Andrew Priestley was on a committee that developed a regional strategy post Sydney 2000.

What happens after any Olympics Games business-wise? Andrew Priestley was on a committee that developed a regional strategy post Sydney 2000.

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  • 1.        How  Our  Local  Business  Community    Created  and  Leveraged  Business  Opportunities  Connected  to  the  Olympic  Games    Andrew  Priestley  -­‐  London,  UK  2012        Disclaimer  This  is  for  discussion,  education  and  information  purposes  only  and  does  not  constitute  advice.  Be  aware  that  the  anecdotes  pertain  to  research  conducted  for  the  1988  Games;  and  preparations  for  the  Sydney  2000  Olympics  and  notes  span  1992-­‐1996;  and  2000-­‐2004.  Some  data  and  trends  may  now  be  outdated.  Every  effort  has  been  made  to  make  the  comments  general  and  relevant  to  2012  circumstances.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 1 of 27
  • 2. Introduction  In  1994,  I  lived  on  the  Sunshine  Coast  Queensland,  Australia  and  I  was  part  of  a  local  Chamber  of  Commerce  committee  to  understand  and  leverage  opportunities  for  the  business  community  of  our  local  region  regarding  the  Sydney  2000  Olympic  games.    The  Sunshine  Coast  is  located  in  the  South-­‐East  sub-­‐tropical  coastal  corner  of  Queensland,  Australia.      Historically  it  was  associated  with  the  timber  industry,  farming,  cattle  and  produce  growing.  At  the  time  the  three  biggest  industries  were  tourism,  retail  and  construction.    It  is  also  developing  a  reputation  for  innovation  and  clean  tech  industry.    It  is  still  one  of  Australia’s  fastest  growing  regional  centres.  At  the  time  the  population  was  about  150,000  but  spread  over  a  wide  area  extending  from  the  northern  suburbs  of  Brisbane  and  Caboolture  north  to  Noosa,  Fraser  Island  and  Gympie  and  west  to  the  hinterland  of  Kenilworth  and  Conondale.    We  started  thinking  about  opportunities  early  -­‐  about  six  years  out.  Discussions  were  initiated  by  the  local  authority  and  local  tourist  development  board.  The  region  had  a  number  of  high  profile  theme  parks  but  it  was  felt  that  the  region  had  more  to  offer  than  fun  parks  and  waterslides.  The  goal  was  to  distribute  the  benefits  of  tourism  to  all  the  community.    I  learned  a  lot  because  I  honestly  thought  that  the  only  money  to  be  made  during  the  Olympic  season  was  IN  or  around  Sydney.  It  was  exciting  to  realise  that  the  reach  of  the  Games  would  be  felt  a  lot,  lot  further  than  the  proximate  Olympic  arena  and  village.  I  learned  that  a  lot  of  visitors  would  be  in  Sydney  for  the  event  and  once  the  Games  part  was  over  they’d  be  seeing  a  lot  more  of  Australia.      Again  my  perception  was  big  cities  and  major  tourist  attractions.  I  am  indebted  to  the  consultants  who  opened  our  eyes  to  the  opportunities  for  the  smallest  and  most   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 2 of 27
  • 3. remotely  located  businesses.  And  I  was  fascinated  with  the  research  of  just  how  long  the  Olympics  continues  to  draw  tourists,  what  they  come  to  see  and  do,  what  they  like  and  don’t  like  and  what  else  is  tempting  for  a  visitor.    I  learned  that  touristy  things  comprises  a  small  part  of  visitor  spend.  Visitors  want  to  be  entertained  and  educated.  Importantly  they  want  lasting  memories  that  extend  way  beyond  the  sporting  attractions.    What  happened  in  our  community?  It  is  estimated  that  the  Sydney  Olympics  generated  an  estimated  $200M  in  revenues  for  our  small  regional  centre.  This  included  revenues  generated  in  the  seven  weeks  surrounding  the  event  and  ongoing  revenues  tracked  for  at  least  4-­‐6  years  after  the  event.  It  also  created  jobs  for  our  region.      What  worked?  We  a)  got  creative  (and  uncomfortable)  and  b)  we  took  a  planned  and  unified  approach  to  marketing  our  region  -­‐  all  prior  to  internet  and  social  media;  and  c)  we  took  a  long  term  approach  and  continued  to  promote  the  region  long  after  the  Games.    Importantly,  the  local  authority  hired  several  consultants  with  Olympic  experience  and  we  tapped  into  some  solid  research  from  the  1988  Olympic  Games.  But  I  think  we  realised  that  we  could  benefit  from  the  Games  and  then  took  action.      It  is  important  to  remember  this  context.    I  will  tell  you  how  we  did  it    with  a  case  study.    But  first  …     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 3 of 27
  • 4. Who  comes  and  why?  The  goal  is  to  design  campaigns  specifically  to  attract  a  niche  market.  It  is  important  therefore  to  understand  exactly  who  comes  and  why.    There  are  several  key  categories  of  visitors:      i.  The  Sports  Specialists  This  includes:    The  Competitors/Athletes  This  comprises  the  athletes,  coaches,  trainers,  medicos  and  teams.  Money-­‐wise,  this  small  group  will  come  and  be  mainly  focused  on  the  Olympic  site,  the  Games  and  the  immediate  environs.    ii.  The  Affliates  This  comprises  the  power  brokers  and  power  seekers  and  includes  political  representatives;  and  families,  spouses  and  partners;  and  the  entourage.    Associates  This  includes  investors,  sponsors  and  promoters  who  want  to  be  associated  with  excellence.  Historically  every  Olympic  Games  are  an  occasion  for  business  networking,  training  events  and  conferences.    iii.  Strategists    These  are  the  lobbyists.  Again  power  brokers  and  power  seekers.    iv.  The  tourists  These  are  the  games  voyeurs  looking  for  a  ‘bigger  than  life’  experience.  Specifically  they  are  looking  for  life  long  memories  based  in  and  around  an  international  and  cultural  experience.         © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 4 of 27
  • 5. Technically  they  are  passengers  –  here  for  the  ride  of  their  life.  The  key  question  is:    What  will  most  people  do  with  their  time  and  their  money?    At  the  time  the  research  suggested:    • The  Competition  7%     Statistically  they  attend  two  events  only!  Essentially  during  the  Games  few  sleep,   but  most  drink  and  eat  in  that  order.      After  drink  and  food  and  accommodation  what  else  will  they  do?      Revenues  historically  go  to:    • Arts  and  entertainment  20%  • History  and  culture  33%  • Natural  attractions  40%    What  else  do  they  do?  They  attend  any  special  events,  conferences,  trainings,  courses;  and  leisure  activities.  There  is  a  huge  market  for  organised  activities.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 5 of 27
  • 6. When  do  they  come?  For  your  reference,  the  1988  Olympics  served  as  the  model  for  1992,  1996,  2000  and  2004  Olympics.  What  happened  in  the  1988  Games  was:    1979       1988      Strategists   Lobbyists   Media   Athletes   Conference   Conference   Planners   Controllers   Arts   Arts   Spectators   Exhibitors   Exhibitors   Tours   Tours   Events   Events    1994   1998   2000   2004   2005    Conference   Conference   Athletes   Conference      Arts   Arts   Controllers   Arts  Exhibitors   Exhibitors   Spectators   Exhibitors  Tours   Tours   Tours  Events   Events   Events     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 6 of 27
  • 7. Where  else  do  they  go?  Historically,  the  Games  generate  interest  in  the  immediate  surrounding  areas  starting  with  the  host  city.  For  example  Westfield  is  located  at  the  Olympic  venue  in  London  (2012)  and  they  are  boasting  that  70%  of  the  spectators  will  pass  through  that  area.  Westfield  are  no  slouches  when  it  comes  to  research  so  if  they  are  there  I  am  fairly  confident  they  have  done  long  term  projections.      A  typical  Westfields  development  in  Australia  works  on  a  25  year  plan  –  so  I  am  guessing  they  have  done  their  numbers.  But  this  retail  focused.    Visitors  then  explore  the  immediate  local  regions;  then  nationally,  then  neighbouring  major  regions  i.e.,  Europe.      For  example  the  LA  Games  was  the  jump  off  point  for  Las  Vegas,  Alaska,  the  Rockies,  Chicago,  New  York;  and  Asia;  and  Europe.  NB:  the  European  marketing  focused  on  the  seniors  market  and  business  conferences.  Business  conferences  are  tax  deductible  with  the  Olympics  as  the  backdrop!    The  research  showed  that  the  lion’s  share  of  revenues  will  go  to  whoever  is  best  organized!  (On  that  basis  Westfield  will  make  a  lot  of  money).    The  Australian  Sunshine  Coast  as  a  region  did  pretty  well  from  the  2000  Games  even  though  located  1300  miles  from  Sydney.  Why?  Because  we  started  early  and  promoted  our  region.  We  worked  with  key  organisers  and  promoters  to  offer  existing    established  and  new  experiences.  In  our  case  we  intensified  our  promotions  about  nine  months  out.    While  ticket  purchases  and  accommodation  bookings  occur  12  to  24  months  out,  broader  booking  choices  for  ex-­‐Olympic  activities  can  still  be  effective  about  9-­‐6  months  out.       © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 7 of 27
  • 8. (To  be  clear  we  worked  closely  with  Tourism  Sunshine  Coast  and  Tourism  Queensland  and  Tourism  Australia  and  the  local  authorities.  I  think  we  had  gazetted  a  lot  of  ideas  and  opportunities  as  well.  Gazetted  means  documented  and  registered  with  the  authority.    In  addition,  those  authorities  were  connecting  to  tourism  agencies  in  America,  London,  Asia  etc.  For  example,  the  flower  show  in  Toowoomba  was  featured  heavily  in  out-­‐bound  literature  going  to  overseas  agencies.    I  am  pretty  sure  that  the  agencies  also  connect  with  tour  operators  and  travel  agents.)    We  know  that  a  huge  turn  off  for  Olympic  guests  are  the  crowds  and  public  transport  hassles  so  they  are  ultimately  looking  to  get  away  from  the  epicentre  of  the  Games  once  they  have  seen  their  ticketed  events.  This  historically  means  they  travel  out  of  town.  They  go  to  regional  areas.      We  said  the  LA  Games  saw  a  massive  boost  in  travel  to  Alaska,  Chicago,  Canada  –  simply  because  these  regions  offered  a  coordinated  approach.  This  is  historically  what  happens  so  we  can  predict  that  visitors  will  gravitate  to  whoever  best  promotes  their  region.    In  the  seven  weeks  around  the  Games  visitors  will  explore  the  hosting  city  i.e.,  London  BUT  then  they  will  then  outer  regions.  They  will  want  to  explore  what  England  seems  famous  for  –  charming  and  quaint  English  countryside,  mountains,  forests,  historic  attractions,  wilderness/deserts,  unique  urban  centres,  diverse  cultural  experiences,  and  themed  activities  i.e.,  arts  community.      If  you  live  in  a  ‘quaint’  village  you  might  not  think  much  of  your  local  fresh  bread  bakery  or  Fran  in  the  local  pub  or  Raj  at  the  local  green  grocer  …  but  a  visitor  finds  all  of  this  novel,  romantic  and  memorable.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 8 of 27
  • 9. You  have  to  get  creative  and  identify  what  is  valuable,  unique  and  special  about  your  region  …  and  package  that  experience.  You  have  to  see  what  you  do  and  your  region  as  special.      Importantly  visitors  want  a  cross  cultural  trails  and  unique  opportunities.  They  want  high  quality,  no  hassles  and  ‘capsule’  memories  (packaged  experiences).    The  key  offering  is  memories.      One  way  to  create  a  memorable  experience  is  through  the  creation  of  trails.    Trails  Visitors  will  have  to  travel.  So  if  they  have  to  travel  distances  they  want  trails.  They  want  to  know  where  they  are  going.  Imagine  a  12  day  bus  trip  round  Europe.  We  leave  London,  go  to  Brussels,  Heidelberg,  Zurich,  Roma,  Venice,  Marseille,  Paris  and  back  to  London.  That’s  a  trail.    I  live  in  Ealing.  When  we’ve  had  friends  stay  we’ve  walked  to  the  park,  gone  to  the  shops,  had  afternoon  tea  at  the  local  French  themed  café,  wander  through  the  gallery,  stopped  in  at  the  Red  Lion  for  a  beer  where  Alec  Guiness  and  Peter  Sellers  used  to  drink  and  then  dinner  at  the  Rose  and  Crown  where  Billy  Bunter  was  written.  That’s  a  trail!  Its  just  smaller.    In  Port  Isaac  in  Cornwall  there’s  ONE  street.  There’s  a  few  curio  shops,  a  pub,  a  rock  wall  to  the  sea  and  a  house.  Its  hard  to  get  to  Port  Isaac  but  it  has  a  thriving  tourist  market  because  ITV’s  Doc  Martin  was  filmed  there.  You  can  get  a  map  which  shows  where  ‘stuff’  is  –  Doc  Martin’s  practice,  Mrs  Tishell’s  shop,  Bert’s  restaurant  and  so  on.  Port  Isaac  must  surely  be  promoting  their  little  village.    The  Australia  TV  show  Sea  Change  was  filmed  in  three  sea  side  locations  and  you  can  do  a  Sea  Change  tour  of  Laura’s  house,  the  Star  of  the  Sea  pub  and  Diver  Dan’s  boat  shed.  That’s  a  trail.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 9 of 27
  • 10. But  …    Nobody  wants  to  see  Port  Isaac  twice.  Not  do  they  want  to  see  another  Aboriginal  dance  troupe  or  a  recreation  of  the  Knights  of  the  Round  Table  or  a  Wild  West  shoot  out  or  a  Casino  experience  twice.  They  want  to  go  to  points  A,  B,  C,  D  and  E  and  see  something  different  and  unique  at  each  point  in  the  trail.      And  they  don’t  want  to  go  to  dud  places.  Ilfracombe  is  lovely.  Barnstaple  nearby  is  awful.  Illfracombe  is  on  the  way  to  Port  Isaac.  Port  Isaac  is  not  far  from  St  Ives.  Lands  End  is  not  far  from  St  Ives  and  it  has  a  great  guest  experience  centre.  But  the  beaches  on  the  way  to  Penzance  are  lovely  but  empty.  And  boring  …  but  not  if  you  are  a  bird  watcher.      The  trails  can  be  vast.  We  already  said  that  the  LA  Games  had  trails  going  to  nearby  San  Diego  but  as  far  north  as  Alaska  and  as  East  as  New  York.      As  an  example  the  LA  Games  had  this  trail:     • Sacremento  –  Old  Town,  the  Railway  Museum  and  the  Capitol   • The  Shakespeare  Festival   • The  Tapestry  and  Talent  Festival  which  pulled  between  700000  and  7M   visitors!   • The  Garlic  Festival  which  attracted  2M  visitors  at  $100  av  spend.   • The  Hearst  Castle  California  –  still  attracting  visitors   • Allenstown  –  100K  visitors  av  spend  $70   • San  Diego  Town  500000  to  3M  visitors  av  spend  $300.   • The  San  Diego  Zoo/Flower  Show    In  most  cases  the  attractions  were  30  minute  to  1-­‐hour  experiences.    The  Sydney  Games  had  trails  to  Queensland,  Perth,  Adelaide  and  gateway  trails  to  Asia  (Indonesia,  China).   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 10 of 27
  • 11.  Again,  we  had  to  rethink  the  idea  that  the  major  tourist  attractions  would  absorb  most  of  the  tourist  money.  To  some  degree  this  is  true.  But  history  shows  that  anyone  can  create  a  profitable  experience.    Such  as  a  coastal  bird  watching  day  out.    Again,  imagine  an  Ealing  Experience.  Ealing  is  a  small  shopping  centre  in  West  London.  But  it  has  pubs,  parks  and  a  theatre  and  quaint  restaurants  and  galleries  and  it  is  close  to  Little  India.  It  seems  mundane  if  you  live  there  but  it  is  totally  NEW  to  visitors.    The  Ealing  Experience  might  start  with  shopping,  takes  in  the  parks,  a  few  quaint  old  pubs,  a  gallery,  a  show.      You  might  ask:  Who  would  buy  that!      Montville  is  on  the  Sunshine  Coast,  Queensland.  It  is  a  VERY  small  town  that  capitalised  on  the  Sydney  2000  Olympics.  It  is  ONE  street  in  a  town  that  is  hard  to  get  to.  But  they  produced  a  user-­‐friendly  street  map  of  cafes,  galleries,  craft  shops,  music  stores  and  restaurants.  The  map  told  them  what  to  watch  out  for  and  look  forward  to.  They  included  nearby  attractions,  (the  dam,  the  rainforest).  The  map  included  B  &  Bs  and  farms  and  unique  hotels.    They  also  beautified  the  parks  and  tidied  the  streets  –  every  day.  They  pruned  and  preened.  They  held  little  meetings  in  the  church  to  train  people  how  to  be  friendly  to  visitors.      Importantly  they  told  the  world  about  it.  How?  They  lodged  their  ideas  with  the  local  tourist  authority.  They  wrote  press  releases  and  sent  clippings  as  far  afield  as  the  quilters  clubs  in  the  USA.    And  all  BEFORE  internet  and  social  media!!      Remember.  The  punters  want  variety.  You  can  only  look  at  trees  and  old  churches  for  so  long.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 11 of 27
  • 12.  You  need  to  build  an  experience  around  what  is  unique  …  or  could  be  unique.  Maybe  its  what  you  take  for  granted.    For  example,  a  lot  of  people  love  the  Murder  Mystery  evenings.  Montville  has  a  thriving  amateur  theatre  society.  They  created  a  short  30-­‐minute  show  that  included  street  performers  and  a  humorous  church  service  (drunken  vicars  and  loads  of  innuendo  and  confusion.)  Local  shop  traders  wore  old  time  costumes.  If  it  is  unique  and  you  promote  it  you  end  up  on  a  trail.    They  promoted  their  art  show.    The  three  keys  are:     • Understanding  tourism  patterns   • Competitive  positioning   • Unique  business  opportunities    The  recurring  theme  is:  don’t  just  focus  on  sporty  themes.  It  is  a  small  market.  This  trend  has  persisted  since  1992.  Money  is  made  at  and  during  the  Games  but  the  real  money  is  made  AFTER  the  Games.    Young  people  do  not  have  the  real  money.  In  1988  the  backpacker  market  was  not  significant.  Backpackers  wanted  a  quick  experience  on  a  tight  budget.  International  seniors  and  investors  do  have  money  and  time.  Not  surprising  every  Games  attracts  the  seniors  markets  who  have  disposable  income  and  want  to  spend.  They  almost  always  keep  showing  up  after  the  Games.    The  competitors,  trainers  and  associates  want  products  and  experiences  developed  for  during  and  after  the  Games.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 12 of 27
  • 13. The  power  brokers,  entourage,  sponsors  and  conferences  goers  offer  the  powerful  market  opportunities.  Those  businesses  that  focused  on  the  power  brokers  ran  conferences,  exhibitions  and  training  events  against  the  Olympic  backdrop  and  post  Olympics.  We  knew  that  training  at  the  xxxxx  xxxxxx  on  the  Sunshine  Coast  was  cheaper  than  training  offered  in  Sydney.  Training  in  the  local  art  gallery  will  be  a  LOT  cheaper  than  Central  London  events.    Believe  it  or  not,  tours  of  Silicon  Valley  were  big  money  spinners.  Tours  of  China’s  industrial  parks  and  factories  was  a  big  money  spinner.  Tours  of  the  local  winery  were  popular.    The  top  three  experiences  we  focused  on  were:     • Unique  arts  experiences   • Unique  community  experiences   • Unique  international  experiences    Our  larger  businesses  also  looked  for  opportunities  to  host  conferences  and  worked  with  organisers  to  offer  unique  visitation  packages.    For  example,  the  Novatel  hotel  chain  promoted  events  through  their  sister  hotels  worldwide.    Surveys  said  that  those  who  benefitted  most  had  offered  high  quality  experiences  with  no  hassles.    I  want  to  emphasise  that  ALL  of  the  marketing  then  was  snail  mail  and  mass  media.  Only  the  very  biog  players  could  afford  a  TV  ad  campaign  which  is  why  a  lot  of  people  chipped  in  money  to  the  tourist  ad  campaigns.    But  with  FREE  social  media  tools  anyone  can  make  a  web  site  or  a  video,  upload  it  or  embed  it  in  an  email  and  message  the  world.   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 13 of 27
  • 14. Positioning  The  first  key  question  we  asked  was:  what  do  we  value?  Why  are  we  valuable?  What  is  special  about  us?  How  are  we  positioned.  Positioning  basically  lives  on  a  spectrum  of  budget  to  premium.  Businesses  were  able  to  position  themselves  on  this  spectrum.      But  we  looked  at  the  flavour  of  our  region  as  an  ‘out-­‐doorsy’  lifestyle  region  –  swimming,  boating,  fishing,  canoeing,  hiking,  camping,  history  etc.    We  had  pocket  of  performance  and  the  arts.  Gympie  created  a  film  festival  (like  Sundance).    And  science  and  manufacturing.    A  big  attraction  was  hospitality  and  food.  Aussie  BBQs  were  a  popular  attraction  and  stupidly  simple.      And  natural  attractions.  The  region  had  mountains  and  rainforests  and  lakes  and  rivers.  And  amazing  flora  and  fauna.    You  have  to  start  thinking.    Target  Markets  We  aimed  at  niche  markets  NOT  the  masses.  Plus  we  focused  on  the  long  term  visitor,  not  the  entry/exit  visitor.  And  the  older  visitor.  The  grey  dollar.  Some  towns  promoted  their  reputation  for  pink  dollar  tourism    The  focus  was  on  ‘stay’  tourism  traffic.  How  do  we  get  people  to  stay  longer?    We  focused  on  experiences  for  2-­‐10  people.       © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 14 of 27
  • 15. Partners  and  Trails  Once  we  got  the  idea  of  trails  we  looked  for  market  partners  locally;  and  regionally.  Montville  teamed  up  with  Noosa  and  Tewantin  to  create  an  art  trail.  Gympie  teamed  up  with  Sovereign  Hill  (Victoria)  to  create  a  gold  trail.  I  think  Australia  Zoo  teamed  up  with  Taronga  Park  and  Dubbo  Zoos  (NSW)  to  create  an  animal  trail.    We  focused  on  arts  –  inspiration;  stories,  history  and  culture;  and  bonds.    Locations  Get  out  a  street  map  and  a  local  map.  You  need  to  think:  what  have  we  got  of  value  that  we  take  for  granted  and  what  might  attract  visitors.  And  who  else  has  value  that  we  can  partner  with?  For  example  Bristol  could  partner  with  Bath.    Events  Get  out  your  calendar  and  look  at  it.    For  example  a  lot  of  trails  look  at  recurring  annual  events  and  then  send  tourists  on  to  the  next  event.  For  example,  the  Maleny  Folk  Festival  flows  into  the  Port  Fairy  Folk  Festival  which  flows  onto  Womalaide.    Toowoomba  has  the  annual  flower  show.    The  Olympics  involves  travel  which  has  romantic  and  sentimental  overtones.  The  Olympic  Spirit  is  about  competition,  national  pride,  gathering  of  clans,  culture  etc.    It  attracts  superstars  and  the  entourage.  It  requires  planning.  Reps  will  come  from  many  nations.  This  equals  business  opportunities  and  business/project  partnerships.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 15 of 27
  • 16. Cooperate  The  research  showed  that  a  unified  marketing  approach  works  best.  Its  almost  that  you  need  to  view  your  local  and  wider  region  as  a  giant  theme  park  and  compile  everything  you  can  offer  in  the  way  of  tours,  experiential  trails,  and  then  link  those  experiences  i.e.,  tours  to  historic  places  and  unique  surroundings.    Everyone  benefits  when  you  work  together.    Gateways  Is  your  area  a  gateway  to  somewhere  else?  Ealing  is  a  gateway  to  Perivale,  Hanwell  and  Chiswick.  Believe  it  or  not  there  is  a  canal  network  that  is  tourist  worthy.      West  London  is  a  gateway  to  the  west  –  Cornwall  and  Devon  and  Wales.      The  UK  is  the  gateway  to  Europe.  You  can  partner  in  that  gateway  or  be  the  unpaid  farewell  committee.  Do  not  watch  and  wave  as  tourist  money  flows  across  the  Channel!  Connect  and  cooperate.  Cross  promote.    Australia  was  the  gateway  to  Asia  and  Pacific  Rim  and  it  included  Indonesia,  Malaysia,  Taiwan,  China,  Korea,  Japan,  Alaska,  Canada  and  California.    People  who  did  really  well  looked  at  their  existing  niche  market  and  looked  for  what  was  being  offered  elsewhere  and  further  afield  and  then  aligned  with  those  opportunities.    For  example,  small  business  exhibitions  is  now  big  business.  I  am  sure  that  Earls  Court  is  not  the  only  small  business  expo  in  London  or  the  UK  or  Wales  or  Scotland  or  Western  Europe.           © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 16 of 27
  • 17. Stay  Tourism  Don’t  waste  time  moving  people  around.  Spend  time  on  leisure  activities  not  waving  people  off  to  other  destinations.  Think:  Stay  tourism.  Think:  who  can  come  and  how  long  will  they  stay?    For  example  a  well-­‐received  package  was  business  and  entertainment  packages.    During  the  Games  look  for  obvious  niches.  For  example,  athletes  and  politicians.    They  are  a  conservative  market  looking  for  an  excuse  to  travel.  After  a  quick  city  experience  they  want  to  escape  mass  experiences.      They  are  weary  but  still  want  to  participate.  What  has  your  community  got  to  offer  and  share  with  them?  Architecture,  history,  nature,  diversity?    Tip:  if  you  run  a  coordinated  campaign  focus  on  quality  control  not  quick  bucks.  We  had  people  who  set  out  to  milk  the  Games.  In  some  cases  one  trader  ruined  months  and  months  of  preparation  because  of  one  shonky  rip  off  stunt.  Be  alert  for  price  manipulators.  Tourists  talk!      Go  for  a  sense  of  community.      The  London  riots  of  2011  brought  communities  together  because  of  strife.  Why  not  come  together  to  leverage  opportunities?  We  realized  that  the  Australian  government  spent  millions  promoting  Australia.  So  is  the  UK  government.  Piggy  back  off  their  efforts.    What  have  you  got  that’s  special?    One  small  town  in  Queensland  Australia  had  a  thriving  timber  industry.  They  already  had  an  woodcraft  festival,  a  furniture  show,  forestry  tours  and  even  a  pest  control  expo!  So  they  offered  timber  experiences.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 17 of 27
  • 18. Using  timber  as  their  theme  they  focused  on  food,  fashion,  gifts,  furniture,  forestry,  shipping,  safety,  coaching,  skills  and  even  law  and  order.  They  created  furniture  store  trails.  They  had  a  train  ride  through  a  forest.  A  pottery  exhibit.  Classes  in  lathes  and  wood  turning.  History  trails.  Markets.  Restoration  expos.  Multicultural  traditions.    Keil  Mountain  is  a  tiny  town  that  focused  on  its  cultural  diversity.  They  already  run  an  annual  food  expo.  They  even  tied  in  with    other  local  festivals  and  even  a  festival  in  Asia  and  Europe!  It  took  some  planning.    What  cultures  live  in  your  area?    Ealing  has  an  amazing  Indian  community  just  up  the  road.  And  a  Polish  community.      Toowoomba  has  an  annual  flower  festival.      London  is  full  of  historic  pubs.  There  has  to  be  a  pub  tour  somewhere.    Bundaberg  is  a  sugar  town  with  historic  pubs  and  Cobb  and  Co  wagons  sugar  mills,  sugar  trains  and  tractors  and  sugar  cane  farms  and  a  sugar  festival.  They  did  a  back  to  the  50s  sugar  festival.    Bundaberg  did  something.  Nambour  –  another  famous  sugar  town  –  did  nothing.    Identify  your  resources.  What  do  you  have  of  value?  You  will  attract  the  same  people  who  value  what  you  value.       © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 18 of 27
  • 19. Attract,  Hold,  Route,  Return  We  focused  on  four  strategies:  Attract   Hold   Route/Trails   Return  What  is  of  value?   Events   Create  experiences   Broker  Specials  What  do  you  do   Accomm   Packages   What  can  we  do  to  annually?   Tours   Family  Packages   get  people  to  refer  Culture   Boardroom   or  come  back?  Eco  tourism   experiences  –  Arts   events,   conferences    We  tried  to  broker  memorable  opportunities  locally,  regionally,  nationally  or  internationally.  Be  the  first,  middle,  exclusive  or  last  experience  but  make  it  memorable.    Focus  on  people,  natural  or  cultural  experiences.    People   Natural   Cultural/Special  Nationalities   Beach   Proximity  experiences  Diversity   Islands   Mills,  cheese,  horse  studs  Artists   Forests   Annual  festivals  Experts  –  fishing,  hiking,   Mountains   Conferences  science,  cooking,  wine,   Hiking   Technology  markets,  medical,   Flora   Car  show  manufacturing,  farmers   Fauna   Bike  show  Languages   Crops   Barge  show   Cattle  country   Craft  show   Hinterland  wals   Theme  parks   Wetlands     Rivers   Farms   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 19 of 27
  • 20.  What  do  we  value?  What  can  we  offer  that  is  quality  or  high  end?    Start  with  family,  cleanliness,  service,  quality,  imagination,  systems,  arts,  environment,  safety,  simple,  old  world,  new  world,  modern,  low  cost,  lifestyle,  fast  food,  slow  food,  action,  relaxing,  intimacy,  engagement,  expertise  etc.  What  positions  you?    Is  it  stories,  myths,  legends?     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 20 of 27
  • 21. How  to  view  tourists  See  a  tourist  as       • Potential  tourist   • Tourist   • Visitor   • Guest   • Ambassador  or  advocate   • Investor    Every  community  has  people  who  hate  tourism.  And  there  are  some  who  proactively  try  to  undermine  your  efforts.  Montville  had  a  local  farmer  who  posted  Go  Home!  billboards  on  his  property  leading  in  to  town.  Some  shop  keepers  cynically  posted  and  boasted    ‘local  and  tourist’  rates.    In  1994  you  could  get  away  with  that  sort  of.  But  you  can’t  do  that  now.  People  film  and  upload  this  sort  of  thing  on  their  mobile  phones  and  seconds  later  its  global.    Who  do  you  want  as  a  visitor?      For  example,  if  you  are  Chinese  you  can  track  your  heritage  to  Bundaberg  because  a  lot  of  Chinese  families  were  engaged  to  create  the  sugar  industry.      I  can  track  my  ancestors  to  the  West  Brompton  Cemetery  where  Beatrix  Potter  is  buried.  Cemetery  tours  are  a  huge  money  spinner.    A  guest  will  ask:  Is  my  story  here?     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 21 of 27
  • 22. Revision:  What  happens  after  the  games?  Historically,  there  is  an  after  burn  effect  long  after  the  Games  finish.  This  can  be  when  the  real  revenues  start  to  kick  in.  Do  not  assume  that  the  revenue  making  opportunities  cease  once  the  games  end.  Historically  thats  when  they  start.    Once  they  have  experienced  the  games  visitors  move  on  to  other  experiences  such  as  festivals  -­‐  both  national,  recognised  and  regional.  If  it  is  unique  and  quality  and  promoted  it  tends  to  work.    Dont  just  offer  touristy  things.  Offer  business  opportunities,  trainings  and  special  entertainment.    What  we  learned  Above  all  we  learned  to  be  creative  and  use  our  imagination  both  as  a  region  and  as  individual  businesses.  Have  a  vision  and  envision  the  positive  future.  And  it  has  to  be  strategic.  Strategic  planning  will  trump  random  and  ad  hoc  attempts  to  cash  in.      1.  Recognise  arts  opportunities  2.  Marketing  -­‐  plan  for  niche  markets  and  power  brokers  not  mass  markets  3.  Position  for  what  visitors  are  seeking  -­‐  history,  business  opportunities,  entertainment,  positions.  4.  Create  themed  activities.  5.  Look  for  ways  to  promote  business  opportunities.  6.  Use  a  unified  approach.    I  think  the  Sunshine  Coast  benefitted  because  we  identified  our  natural  attractions  and  existing  tourist  attractions.  (NB:  Being  an  existing  tourist  attraction  is  no  guarantee  you  will  dominate  visitor  spend.  Visitors  are  looking  for  something  unique  -­‐  not  hackneyed.)    Word  of  mouth  carries  during  and  after  the  Games.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 22 of 27
  • 23. What  do  visitors  talk  to  others  about?  Word  of  mouth  is  a  massive  opportunity.  You  want  good  PR.  You  want  advocates.    The  standards  apply:  quality,  service,  value  and  cleanliness.  Add  friendliness  and  genuine  interest  too.    1.  Believe  it  or  not  they  talk  about  how  clean  a  region  is.    If  your  local  town  has  a  lax  approach  to  litter  and  graffiti  for  example,  that  WILL  carry.  Clean  up.  If  you  run  a  shop  keep  it  clean.  Encourage  your  residents  to  tidy  up  and  take  pride.  The  little  town  of  Monteville  absolutely  benefitted  because  the  residents  made  a  unified  and  concerted  effort  to  tidy  their  village.  It  had  a  thriving  arts  community  and  the  place  had  instant  appeal.  Locals  removed  rubbish  and  kept  the  village  spit  spot.    Disneyland  gets  more  comments  about  its  cleanliness  than  any  other  aspect.    2.  They  talk  about  friendliness.  Learn  to  smile  and  engage.  There  is  nothing  worse  than  treating  visitors  shabbily.    If  you  do  not  want  to  see  Olympic  tourists  stay  away.      As  a  region  discourage  anyone  who  displays  ‘Go  Home’  banners.  That  can  ruin  everything  you  are  working  towards.    3.  They  talk  about  rip-­‐offs.  Those  towns  or  individuals  businesses  that  decided  the  Olympics  was  a  opportunity  to  rip  off  visitors  did  NOT  historically  benefit.  Visitors  sensed  they  were  being  ripped  off  and  that  news  carried.  With  social  media  one  tweet  or  blog  can  hit  up  to  8000  people  within  minutes.  Visitors  will  search  on  line  for  value.    NB:  if  you  are  in  a  village  that  has  a  hotel  that  has  hiked  its  prices  visitors  will  talk  about  that  problem  ...  which  impacts  every  other  business.  Anyone  doing  a  solo  effort  and  who  is  ripping  off  visitors  is  damaging  your  regional  reputation.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 23 of 27
  • 24. We  had  some  cowboys  too  and  business  close  buy  WERE  hurt  by  their  selfishness.      4.  They  talk  about  service.  Visitors  let  others  know  if  the  service  was  good.  Be  friendly  and  accommodating  and  be  of  service.    5.  They  talk  about  relationships.  Tourists  want  to  connect.  They  remember  the  old  lady  who  sold  them  a  ticket  for  a  pony  ride  who  chatted  about  the  history  of  the  local  horses.  In  fact  they  talk  more  about  connections  than  attractions.      Work  Together  I  can  only  say  that  our  region  worked  together.  This  meant  funding  etc  but  it  also  meant  doing  basic  things  like  tidying  up,  repairing,  pruning,  beautifying.      Our  region  did  a  lot  better  than  regions  with  a  lot  more  to  offer.  Other  regions  with  better  amenities  and  attractions  were  complacent  and  assumed  visitors  would  just  naturally  go  there.  We  offered  a  well-­‐orchestrated  campaign  before,  during  and  long  afterwards  and  the  region  benefitted  for  several  years  after  the  Games.    Plan  People  might  say  it  is  too  late.  This  is  never  true.  Planning  helps  but  you  can  still  leverage  the  Games  at  any  time.  Social  media  is  probably  your  best  tool  in  2012.  A  simple  video  or  five  on  Youtube  about  your  local  area  can  work  wonders.    Think  Long  Range  If  you  missed  the  Games  the  research  says  there  is  an  after  effect.  You  can  STILL  leverage  Olympic  tourism.  In  fact  you  have  up  to  seven  years  after  the  Games  to  do  so  in  most  cases.  UK  is  in  the  world  spotlight.  A  lot  of  people  will  not  want  to  go  to  London  during  the  Olympics.  They  will  wait  till  the  crowds  leave  and  the  prices  go  back  to  normal.  But  they  are  intending  to  come.  Keep  promoting.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 24 of 27
  • 25. Special  considerations  We  coordinated  our  positioning  and  marketing,  focused  on  culture,  offered  education  and  training  for  local  businesses,  information  services,  positive  media  coverage,  technology  and  political  assistance  (i.e.,  relax  local  ordinances  for  street  parades).     1. Positioning  –  this  included  identifying  our  self-­‐image  and  positioning.  We   discussed  how  we  wanted  to  be  perceived  i.e.,  arts  and  history.     2. Culture  –  culture  offers  a  stabilising  influence  that  people  want  to  return  to.   This  is  why  so  many  Aussies  travel  to  the  UK.  Culture  taps  into  values  and  we   are  attracted  to  stable  values.  For  example,  we  agreed  to  offer  genuinely   friendly  and  interested  service.  People  commented  most  on  how  interested   we  were  in  them.  We  purposely  talked  about  spending  time  with  visitors.     3. Education  –  We  ran  education  nights  for  the  local  businesses.  In  some  cases   we  looked  at  retraining  people  to  actually  like  visitors.  The  biggest  hurdle  was   getting  people  to  cooperate.  People  don’t  compete  when  they  know  where   they  are  going  together.         4. Media  –  the  media  has  a  long  reaching  ability  to  transmit  the  right  and  wrong   messages.  We  asked  the  local  media  to  focus  on  what  we  were  doing  well.   We  also  learned  to  not  add  the  media  and  marketing  until  we  knew  where   we  were  going.  Media  picks  up  on  confusion  otherwise  and  treats  that  as  a   story.  Remember,  we  make  the  message.  The  media  isn’t  establishing  the   message  they  are  just  speaking  for  us.     5. Politics  –  we  sought  support,  funding  and  cooperation  from  the  local   government  and  councils.  We  wanted  strong  direction  and  leadership  as  well   from  our  elected  members.  Again  the  focus  was  on  the  politicians  speaking   for  us  not  to  us.  Representing  our  wishes.     © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 25 of 27
  • 26. Who  made  our  job  difficult?    Unions  A  potential  threat  to  our  Olympics  campaign  was  union  activity.  The  unions  saw  the  Olympics  as  golden  opportunity  to  push  through  demands  and  pay  rises.  For  example  bus  drivers,  baggage  handlers,  road  workers.  We  worked  with  the  unions  but  they  were  VERY  hard  to  work  with.      Long  after  the  Games  the  locals  remembered  how  uncooperative  the  unions  were.      Cowboys  There  is  a  huge  short-­‐term  temptation  to  hike  prices  because  you  can.  Visitors  expect  you  to  profit  from  the  Games  but  they  are  not  stupid.  We  made  every  effort  to  get  our  local  business  people  to  work  together  –  long  term.  But  one  or  two  strategic  businesses  ran  their  own  race  and  hiked  their  prices  and  that  damaged  our  efforts.  They  did  not  contribute  to  the  plan  but  benefitted  from  our  time,  money  and  effort.    Again  the  resentment  was  palpable.    Government  officials  We  ran  into  the  thinking  that  says  that  extra  visitors  means  extra  load  on  the  local  amenities.  So  this  lead  to  introduced  permits  and  controls  and  restrictions.  For  example  it  was  mooted  that  you  needed  a  permit  to  have  a  BBQ  at  the  park  on  the  beach!  It  was  amended  to  commercial  ventures.  Parking  fees  were  introduced  to  beaches.  I  went  to  a  remote  beach  in  Norwich  and  damn  …  you  had  to  pay  £2  to  park  there.  I  can  imagine  a  parking  inspector  lurking  in  the  bushes  in  the  hope  that  someone  might  venture  down  his  lonely  road!    The  locals  protected  loudly  and  often  it  worked  and  often  it  didn’t.  The  local  airport  introduced  increases  to  landing  tax  to  cover  extra  use  of  amenities  during  the  Games.  It  was  never  rescinded  once  the  Games  ended.   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 26 of 27
  • 27. Snapshot  of  roll  out     • I  attended  a  meeting  put  on  by  the  local  authority  and  local  tourism  board.   (This  assumes  your  local  council  has  a  Games  focus  and  advisory  board.   Check!  Ask!)   • I  attended  meetings  held  by  the  Chamber  of  Commerce.   • I  participated  in  a  local  initiative  to  promote  the  region  through  Tourism   Sunshine  Coast  and  Tourism  Queensland.   • I  received  monthly  ‘what’s  on’  updates  from  Council  as  we  moved  closer  to   the  Games.     • I  met  with  clients  I  knew  to  see  what  help  they  needed  –  because  I  ran  a   small  ad  agency.   • I  went  to  several  meetings  with  the  local  media  –  TV,  radio  and  press.   • I  talked  with  local  magazine  editors  i.e.,  arts,  lifetsyle.   • I  prepared  several  small  seminars.   • I  was  asked  to  be  a  presenter  for  one  of  the  hotel  chains  who  had  an   established  conference  market.   • I  was  given  an  Olympic  Supporter  sticker  for  my  business.  This  initiative  was   to  show  visitors  who  was  supportive  and  who  wasn’t.    Get  the  idea?    In  a  small  way,  I  was  lucky  enough  to  experience  several  of  the  closed-­‐door  committee  sessions.  This  document  is  my  notes  from  those  sessions  and  I  hope  it  is  of  some  value  albeit  limited.      Next  Steps  There  is  a  lot  of  good  info  on  the  net  too  if  you  go  looking.    Good  luck.  Happy  to  talk  about  my  experiences.      Andrew  Priestley  2012   © 1996, 2000 and 2012 Andrew Priestley www.andrewpreistley.com Andrew@andrewpriestley.com UK Phone +44 (0) 7879 330060 27 of 27

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