The Digital Privacy EquationMatthew Vernhout, CIPP/CDirector, Delivery and ISP Relations
Agenda• Privacy Equation  – Trust = Control + Transparency + Value• CASL Update• Q&A
TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
What is Trust?• Trust is built through your products, reputation,  actions, and marketing  – Paid, Earned and Owned• Consu...
10 PIPEDA Principles• Control                 • Transparency  –   Accountability        – Identifying Purpose  –   Consent...
TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
Control Principle – Accountability• Why is Accountability important?  – First stage of trust – declaring what you will do ...
Control Principle – Consent• Consent must be in such a way that the individual clearly  understands what they are agreeing...
Control Principle – Accuracy• Efforts should be made  to provide tools that  allow for users to self  manage their account...
TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
Transparency Principle – Identifying Purpose• Set expectations• Provide examples of what  you collect:   – Name   – Email ...
Transparency Principle – Limiting Collection• Personal information  collected should only be  limited to that which is  ne...
Transparency Principle – Safeguards• Physical Security vs. Virtual Security  – Access Levels within organizations  – Secur...
Transparency Principle – Openness• Provide a central point of  access to your  organization that is trained  in dealing wi...
TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
What is the Value?• Consumers give information  to companies to improve the  relationship/products/service• Problem:   – 7...
Value for Consumers• Inform users what value they can  expect as the relationship deepens:   – Discounts, coupons, points,...
Value for Marketers• Value is where the  Win/Win is found:   – Better offers to     consumers = loyal     consumers      •...
TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE• Give more control to consumers• Join the discussion with consumers and  listen to ...
CASL UPDATE
Overview• Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation  – Consent based messaging       • All messaging channels (email, SMS, IM etc.)  ...
CRTC Regulations•   CEMs need to include these key identifiers:    – The name by which the person sending the message cond...
CRTC Regulations• All unsubscribe mechanisms must be set out clearly  and prominently and must be able to be readily  perf...
Next Steps• Industry Canada to release draft regulations  (expected in September/October)  – 30-day comment period on Draf...
Summary•   Trust is earned•   Be upfront with disclosure and consent•   Provide more self-service tools to users•   Answer...
Q&A
Thank You!             Matthew Vernhout    Director, Delivery and ISP Relations             416-361-3522 x238          mat...
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The Digital Privacy Equation

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TC Media's own Privacy Guru, Matthew Vernhout, shares the key components of the Digital Privacy Equation. Trust = Control, Transparency, and most importantly for consumers, Value. In addition, he provided important updates on the upcoming CASL legislation changes, and what companies can do starting today to ensure compliance.

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Transcript of "The Digital Privacy Equation"

  1. 1. The Digital Privacy EquationMatthew Vernhout, CIPP/CDirector, Delivery and ISP Relations
  2. 2. Agenda• Privacy Equation – Trust = Control + Transparency + Value• CASL Update• Q&A
  3. 3. TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
  4. 4. What is Trust?• Trust is built through your products, reputation, actions, and marketing – Paid, Earned and Owned• Consumers maintain multiple contact profiles and share these with marketers based on the trust equation: – Free web email accounts – Social media profiles – Postal address – Cable/ISP/Work email accounts – Mobile phone numbers
  5. 5. 10 PIPEDA Principles• Control • Transparency – Accountability – Identifying Purpose – Consent – Limiting Collection – Accuracy – Limiting Use, – Individual Access Disclosure and Retention – Safeguards – Openness – Challenging Compliance
  6. 6. TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
  7. 7. Control Principle – Accountability• Why is Accountability important? – First stage of trust – declaring what you will do with any Personal Information that you collect from the recipient• Potential Conflicts: – Consumers want to know what you plan on doing with the information you are collecting – Marketers want to do more with the information being collected #1 complaint source for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner in 2011
  8. 8. Control Principle – Consent• Consent must be in such a way that the individual clearly understands what they are agreeing to.• Think about more granular control of consent - Consumer: – Implied vs. Explicit consent #3 Complaint Source for OCP investigations in 2011
  9. 9. Control Principle – Accuracy• Efforts should be made to provide tools that allow for users to self manage their accounts and profiles.• Pro tip: – Build solutions that allow for self-service management with controls to notify users of significant changes to their accounts (passwords, email addresses, etc.)
  10. 10. TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
  11. 11. Transparency Principle – Identifying Purpose• Set expectations• Provide examples of what you collect: – Name – Email – Phone, etc.• Why you need it and how you plan on using it: – Billing and subscription information
  12. 12. Transparency Principle – Limiting Collection• Personal information collected should only be limited to that which is necessary for the purposes identified.• Limit the number of questions. – imagescape.com case study: a shortened contact form saw • + 160% in the number of forms submitted • + 120% in conversion
  13. 13. Transparency Principle – Safeguards• Physical Security vs. Virtual Security – Access Levels within organizations – Security policies and internal audits of these practices• Examples: – Public tweets from wrong account: Automotive company recently fired their agency over a misplaced tweet from the social media manager. – Prevention: Have separate tools/accounts to limit this type of exposure.
  14. 14. Transparency Principle – Openness• Provide a central point of access to your organization that is trained in dealing with customers and non-customers interacting with your business• Examples: – Social media (Community Managers) – Privacy Officer/Team – Contact Us/Support
  15. 15. TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE
  16. 16. What is the Value?• Consumers give information to companies to improve the relationship/products/service• Problem: – 74% of North American Consumers don’t see benefit of exchanging personal information and other info• How do you fix this? – Better reporting – Preference centers – Surveys – Identify the perceived value of your brand Source: List of consumer demands, G2 eCulturesEUROPE Report
  17. 17. Value for Consumers• Inform users what value they can expect as the relationship deepens: – Discounts, coupons, points, free content, exclusive invitation, etc. – Targeted and relevant messaging for the recipient – The more information collected, the better targeted the deals, offers and value returned
  18. 18. Value for Marketers• Value is where the Win/Win is found: – Better offers to consumers = loyal consumers • Brand ambassadors are built on earned trust – Rich data for the marketer to build trends, projections and analysis • Increased ROI
  19. 19. TRUST = CONTROL + TRANSPARENCY + VALUE• Give more control to consumers• Join the discussion with consumers and listen to their needs/wants• Use data and feedback to continually improve your marketing efforts• Give people a reason to trust you through your actions and policies
  20. 20. CASL UPDATE
  21. 21. Overview• Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation – Consent based messaging • All messaging channels (email, SMS, IM etc.) – Implied and Express Consent – Includes Identification requirements – Installation of Software – Unsubscribe: Without delay, but not longer than 10 business days• Regulations finalized by CRTC, OPC – Still waiting on Industry Canada
  22. 22. CRTC Regulations• CEMs need to include these key identifiers: – The name by which the person sending the message conducts business – Third party messages you should use the name by which the third party carries on business – A statement indicating which person is sending the message and which person on whose behalf the message is being sent Source: EmailKarma.net: http://ekma.co/KBhihp
  23. 23. CRTC Regulations• All unsubscribe mechanisms must be set out clearly and prominently and must be able to be readily performed. – Find a way around password protected unsubscribes• A request for express consent has been clarified to include: – Oral or written consent – Must be sought separately for each channel (SMS, Email, etc.)• Computer program’s that cause a computer system to operate contrary to reasonable expectations must have a separate consent Source: EmailKarma.net: http://ekma.co/KBhihp
  24. 24. Next Steps• Industry Canada to release draft regulations (expected in September/October) – 30-day comment period on Draft• Release of Final Draft with coming into force date (estimated to be) Q2/3 of 2013
  25. 25. Summary• Trust is earned• Be upfront with disclosure and consent• Provide more self-service tools to users• Answer “What’s in it for me (consumer)?”• Remember: CASL will be enforced next year. – Review your processes now for potential changes
  26. 26. Q&A
  27. 27. Thank You! Matthew Vernhout Director, Delivery and ISP Relations 416-361-3522 x238 matthew.vernhout@tc.tc Twitter: @emailkarma
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