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October 2012 CHRCO Master Plan Update
 

October 2012 CHRCO Master Plan Update

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Powerpoint as presented October 18, 2012 at Community Engagement Meeting, CHORI Library

Powerpoint as presented October 18, 2012 at Community Engagement Meeting, CHORI Library

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  • Hello. Welcome, etc. An update tonight of where we are with the Master Plan, as we had last provided an update in late April.
  • Our goals are to create a plan which works best for all. Patients, parents, neighbors, physicians.
  • What we heard:Collaboration; how will communicate. General neighborhood Needs; painted crosswalks, garbage pickup, earthquake preparedness. Maintenance issues; improving existing lighting, gardening around existing homes. Expansion; where, how far. Master Plan; 10-year plan. Timeline; EIR, construction. Design; will it be green? Cost; how we will pay. Finally-You’d like lasting relationshipsYou like us in the neighborhoodOur staff in the neighborhoodOpen communications of our plansPartner in emerg. preparedness
  • What we heard:Security: Lighting and general upkeep of the homes along 53rd.You’d like lasting relationshipsYou like us in the neighborhoodOur staff in the neighborhoodOpen communications of our plansPartner in emerg. preparedness
  • Last July, the design team had hosted a visioning event with the community, neighbors and staff of Children’s Oakland. This event was created to draw from the community ideas and thoughts about the new Master Plan. That event was several hours in length, with perhaps 200 people providing input. Most importantly, it was a huge success,and provided a unique way for the supporters of Children’s to share their voices.We heard a great deal from the participants, and tallied the results by asking everyone to spend play money on the most talked-about ideas. Physicians included: Dr. Sharon Pilmer, Augusta Saulys, Ann Petru, Barbara Staggers, Andrew Giammona, David Durand, Ronald Cohen, Carolyn Hoppe, Wolfgang Stehr, Hitendra Patel
  • Last July, the design team had hosted a visioning event with the community, neighbors and staff of Children’s Oakland. This event was created to draw from the community ideas and thoughts about the new Master Plan. That event was several hours in length, with perhaps 200 people providing input. Most importantly, it was a huge success,and provided a unique way for the supporters of Children’s to share their voices.We heard a great deal from the participants, and tallied the results by asking everyone to spend play money on the most talked-about ideas. Physicians included: Dr. Sharon Pilmer, Augusta Saulys, Ann Petru, Barbara Staggers, Andrew Giammona, David Durand, Ronald Cohen, Carolyn Hoppe, Wolfgang Stehr, Hitendra Patel
  • First step. To ensure project meets applicable zoning req’s, as well as development and design-related criteria. Will get appointment with appropriate city personnel. Planner will outline specific zoning issues, permits and procedures.
  • Begin Intro of Master Plan
  • The following slides are as submitted in the ZPA. To begin, an aerial shot of the Campus, with CHORI up on the top left, and the main campus down at the lower center. This image is used primarily for orientation.
  • Masterplan: I’ll walk you through it in 3 steps here. Images taken from the Zoning PreApp, submitted 9/21Developed to address the improvement, reorganization, and expansion of inpatient and outpatient facilities, satellite facilities, site and roadwork, and related infrastructure.Left side: Existing state. Hospital in grey. Homes we do not own, are in purple. Scope of phase 1, outlined in red.Build new OPC2 addition. New road alignment. Interior renovations. Central Utility Plant. ON the east campus, a family residence and admin Building. Re-route of utilities at south of site.
  • PHASE 2: Structures in BLUE, demo. Vacated BC wing demolished. Trailers, Bruce LyonsRsrchCtr and Helipad removed.Build new 3-5 story Link Building. 4 level, 324 stall parking structure. CUP is built as.
  • PHASE 2, cont: 5 level, 120,000 SF A cute Care Patient Pavilion. Convert rooms on 5th to Single-bed patient rooms.
  • Elevations, showing approximate scale of the new buildings, alongside the existing.MLK looking east on top, Dover looking west on bottom.
  • In addition to the studies of OPC2 at the west, we are also looking at the eastern side of the OPC1. The image above shows a solution utilizing properties under Children’s ownership. The image at the bottom studies if we owned all the parcels along 52nd.
  • We also heard from our community a passionate interest in sustainability. We’ve been working with Children’s Oakland to create a path for successful implementation of sustainability.These next several slides about Sustainability. About planning, building, and operating our built environment, in a green fashion. It is about taking our buildings, which are made expressly to support and nurture healing and health, and aligning them with your core mission of protecting the health and well-being of children.It is about how the unique operational and regulatory settings of healthcare dramatically change the game. And it is about why, and how, to walk along the green path, and understanding its many benefits to your patients, their families, and the communities you serve.
  • The city of Oakland has adopted, effective Jan 2011, a set of Green Building Compliance standards. These standards apply to all development in the city, residential and non-res, all sizes. The standards require us to build to a baseline compliance level of LEED Silver, with USGBC Certification. Discuss what is involved in this.The state (OSHPD) will review the new Pavilion, Central plant and Ops building. As such, they do not fall under the city stds. HOWEVER, we are obligated to use CalGreen, a new component of the Cal Bldg Code. Very little of these are applicable, and some measures are dubbed ‘voluntary’OPC: Certified Silver CertifiedCUP, New Pavilion: CalGreenParking Structure: Best PracticesSite Development: Bay-Friendly LandscapeHere is where a team decision really comes in; to certify or not. The cost of tracking, reviewing and following up on the measures is what can add substantial cost. 2-4% of project cost as a rough guideline.City also requires the Green Building Certification, signed off by a third party as validation of the compliance.
  • LEED HC – GeneralWe have best practices for the design and construction of healthy and sustainable healthcare facilities. And then we can go beyond….When the LEED rating systems initially came out, LEED did not specially address the issues that the healthcare community and designers deal with regularly; Buildings that consume huge amounts of energy and water and that serve immune-compromised populations. So the Green Guide for Health was developed and piloted with 100 hospitals. Out of this we developed the LEED for Healthcare rating system – to assist with the designing buildings to promote healthful, durable, environmentally sound building practices in design & construction.
  • SitesHC facilities as we know are demanding & stressful environments serving sensitive populations. We look to design a campus and buildings that: 1.      provide access to nature – access to nature can calm and relax those under stress and can improve patient outcomes, with healing gardens, landscaped areas (separate) for staff and families/patients2.      can deliver good neighborhood ….. - through reduced light pollution, on-site emissions and noise, by extending alternative transportation for the staff, families and visitors (electric cars, extend bike lanes around campus, mitigate urban heat island and by potentially integrating art into surrounding neighborhood / along Bart lineAreas of Respite, Access to Public TransportationAccess to nature, incorporating art and distractions, physical connections to bike paths, healing gardens, staff areas separate,
  • Water1.      Hospitals are water intensive, top 10 water consumer2.      We live & work in an environment with limited water resources!3.      It is key to identify the ops to conserve water in systems and in fixtures / as well as key work closely with infection control staff4.      There are opportunities to consider recycling process water or cooling tower blowdown for irrigation for the healing gardens and landscape5.      We can integrate M+V for water as well as energy systems to optimize performance, not only initially but for the life of the buildings and minimize the environmental + economic effects associated with water systems.
  • EnergyHC facilities – 2nd highest energy usage intensity of any building type, just behind food serviceMajor source of airborne contaminants to immediate surroundings with the extended op schedule, back-up generators, process boilers/heaters, etc. Critical to the health of the community and not only the campus population.Plenty of ops to increase energy efficiencies, develop low-emitting renewable resources – potentially to partner with some of the innovators in the Oakland Negawatt Community.Ops to stand out as a leader, to build public awareness and build support for the projects.2nd highest after food, airborne contaminants, Negawatt alley partnerships, (Sungevity, etc..)
  • Materials & ResourcesOne key element to being good stewards is to encourage pollution prevention, waste reduction and to ensure selections of sustainably sourced materials. Hospitals create large volumes of waste and consideration has to be given to designing the facilities to handle not only the volumes of waste but also to prevent potential contamination onsite and in the community.We also focus on the selection of materials with no to limited amounts of chemicals of concern. Image an ED with materials and cleaning protocols that will not trigger asthma or respiratory illness or a cancer center with materials with content not connected to cancer.
  • IEQWe look to enhance the indoor air quality and experience for the patients, their family & visitors and the staff. We have many opportunities in reducing the source of emissions from the air brought into the facility to the material selections and the construction practices – both during and before occupancy. The acoustic environment plays a key role as well as providing access to daylight, views and to the natural world. And finally also having the opportunity to somewhat control your environment in lighting and temperature can be key to improved patient outcomes, staff recruitment and retention.
  • InnovationsWe look forward to working with you to develop the “Sustainable Innovations” for your buildings & campus designs. Ideas that support involvement and support of the community, anchor the opportunities to build community support, and to support CHO’s mission to protect and advance the health & well-being of the children you serve….We have some initial ideas to suggest, green housekeeping to support occupant and environmental health; restoring part of the Temescal Creek; incorporating art into the Bart Tracks for a positive distraction not only for CHRCO patients/staff, but also for the community; adding bike paths to the area surrounding the campus; …..
  • http://www2.oaklandnet.com/Government/o/PBN/OurServices/Application/DOWD009157Reference that we will have this link available on our CHOnext100.org site.
  • http://www.chonext100.org/?page_id=230
  • Thanks. For more information, please visit our website we created to keep the community informed of our progress.
  • Hello. An update tonight of where we are with the Master Plan, as we had last provided an update in late April.

October 2012 CHRCO Master Plan Update October 2012 CHRCO Master Plan Update Presentation Transcript

  • Community Engagement Meeting October 18, 2012
  • Planning Our Future Thank you for your input. We’ve been working to produce a plan for the hospital that is beneficial for both our patients and the neighborhood.
  • What We’ve Done We’ve listened to your feedback from our previous meetings and used our discussions to produce a preliminary plan to rebuild the Hospital. Community Meetings: – Neighborhood Meeting 1, March 2012 – Neighborhood Meeting 2, April 2012 – Visioning Session, July 2012 – Coffee Talks, July and September, 2012
  • What We Heard Security and safety A partner in emergency preparedness A clear means of communication A good neighbor Frequent updates of our plans
  • Community Visioning Event July 28, 2012
  • Community Visioning Event July 28, 2012
  • Zoning Pre-Application What is it? • First step in the formal zoning process • One-on-one opportunity for City Planners to outline specific zoning issues, permits or procedures associated with the project • Helps ensure that the project meets necessary requirements to avoid costly delays • A way to fully consider alternatives and modifications to our plan This application is not a finalized plan.
  • Master Plan Update
  • Existing Conditions Aerial view of neighborhood, looking north. Northbound 24 exit.. 53rd Street 53rd Street West on 52nd Street.. Corner of Dover and 52nd The ‘Baby Hospital’
  • Phase 1
  • Phase 2
  • Phase 2
  • Elevations
  • Options
  • Green and LEED Why Go Green Agency Requirements Project Specifics Analysis First Steps Sustainability
  • What is required? City of Oakland State of California Green Building Compliance Standards LEED Silver Bay-Friendly Landscaping Environmental Impact Review CalGreen Standards of California Building Code State Review by OSHPD
  • •Sustainable Sites •Water Efficiency •Energy and Atmosphere •Materials and Resources •Indoor Environmental Quality •Innovation in Design •Regional Credits LEED for Healthcare. Categories. 7
  • Sustainable Sites LEED for Healthcare.
  • Water Efficiency LEED for Healthcare.
  • Energy and Atmosphere LEED for Healthcare.
  • Materials and Resources LEED for Healthcare.
  • LEED for Healthcare. Indoor Environmental Quality
  • Innovation in Design LEED for Healthcare.
  • Next Steps • Drafting of Environmental Impact Report for the project underway by LSA ; Information will be available online at: www2.Oaklandnet.com/Government • Public Hearings are planned for Spring 2013. Our plans include meeting with the community prior to then. • We will continue hosting monthly Coffee Talks to address your concerns in the neighborhood
  • We’d like to hear your thoughts.
  • Discussion
  • Thank You! www.CHOnext100.org
  • Community Engagement Meeting October 18, 2012