Training for Handling
Hazardous Materials
Definition of Hazardous Materials
“A hazardous material is defined as any
substance or material could adversely affect
the...
Why is Training Necessary?
Human error due to ineffective training is the
most common cause of accidents associated
with h...
49 CFR Parts 100-185
Also known as the Hazardous Materials
Regulations, the standard, codified as 49 CFR
Parts 100-185 was...
The Hazardous Materials
Regulations’ Training Requirements
• Indicated by subpart H of Part 172 of the
HMR
• Required of h...
Hazmat Employees
A person employed by a hazmat employer and is
directly involved with hazmat transportation.
Responsibilit...
Hazmat Employers
Hazmat employers employ hazmat workers in
transporting hazmat for commercial purposes.
The term covers an...
Training Deadlines and Other
Requirements
• Training should be completed within 90 days from
the date of hire or change in...
• Hazmat employees must be assessed
following training completion;
• Hazmat training may be provided by hazmat
employers o...
Five Types of Training
General Awareness/Familiarization Training
• Is required of all hazmat employees;
• Provides employ...
Function-Specific Training
• Dedicated training for specific job roles;

• Provides hazmat employees a
comprehensive under...
Safety Training
• Is required of all hazmat employees;
• Provides workers knowledge and skills in
recognizing hazardous ma...
Security Awareness Training
• Required of all hazmat employees;
• Provides employees information on security
risks that co...
In-Depth Security Training
• Is required of security personnel manning a
hazmat facility as well as security managers
and ...
Types of Hazardous Materials

•
•
•
•
•

Hazardous materials, according to the US
Department of Transportation, are divide...
• Class 6: Poison (Toxic) and Poison Inhalation
Hazard
• Class 7: Radioactive
• Class 8: Corrosive
• Class 9: Miscellaneou...
Reporting Hazardous Material
Information
• Why do workers need to collect data from each vehicle
that carries hazardous ma...
Components of an Accident or
Collision Report Supplement:
Guide Questions (Wordings May Vary)

1. Does the vehicle have a ...
• Placard Example:

U.S. Department of Transportation
(www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
This question intends to determine whether a
placarded hazardous material was actually
released and not stolen from a tran...
2. ENTER THE FOUR-DIGIT NUMBER (OR
NAME) FROM THE PLACARD 1 9 9 3
The said four-digit number should be found
on an orange ...
3. ENTER THE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
CLASS NUMBER FROM THE BOTTOM OF
THE PLACARD 3
The Class number is composed of one or two
...
4. WAS HAZARDOUS CARGO
RELEASED? YES NO
This will help workers identify the cargo, and
determine whether it has been relea...
Sources:
• Northeastern University. Office of Environmental Health and
Safety. Web. (n.d.) December 2013
http://www.ehs.ne...
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Training for Handling Hazardous Materials

  1. 1. Training for Handling Hazardous Materials
  2. 2. Definition of Hazardous Materials “A hazardous material is defined as any substance or material could adversely affect the safety of the public, handlers or carriers during transportation.” – Department of Transportation Northeastern University
  3. 3. Why is Training Necessary? Human error due to ineffective training is the most common cause of accidents associated with handling hazardous materials. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  4. 4. 49 CFR Parts 100-185 Also known as the Hazardous Materials Regulations, the standard, codified as 49 CFR Parts 100-185 was issued by the Department of Transportation’s Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). The standard applies to commercial transportation lines that operate by land, air, and water. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  5. 5. The Hazardous Materials Regulations’ Training Requirements • Indicated by subpart H of Part 172 of the HMR • Required of hazmat employees and employers Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  6. 6. Hazmat Employees A person employed by a hazmat employer and is directly involved with hazmat transportation. Responsibilities include: operating a vehicle that transports hazmat; loading and unloading hazmat; packing hazmat for transportation; ensures the safety of hazmat transportation. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  7. 7. Hazmat Employers Hazmat employers employ hazmat workers in transporting hazmat for commercial purposes. The term covers any Indian tribe or state agency or representative division involved in the sales and transportation of hazmat. The term also covers owner-operators of vehicles that are used for transporting hazmat for commercial uses. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  8. 8. Training Deadlines and Other Requirements • Training should be completed within 90 days from the date of hire or change in job function; • Hazmat employees should be supervised by a trained person throughout the duration of their training before engaging in hazmat handling, storage or transportation; • Hazmat employees should complete refresher training once every three years; Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  9. 9. • Hazmat employees must be assessed following training completion; • Hazmat training may be provided by hazmat employers or public or private third-party providers; • Hazmat training should be current and should address the job demands of the hazmat employee; Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  10. 10. Five Types of Training General Awareness/Familiarization Training • Is required of all hazmat employees; • Provides employees a general background of the requirements of the HMR; • Provides hazmat employees the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively recognize and identify hazardous materials; Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  11. 11. Function-Specific Training • Dedicated training for specific job roles; • Provides hazmat employees a comprehensive understanding of the requirements of the HMR that their job entails Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  12. 12. Safety Training • Is required of all hazmat employees; • Provides workers knowledge and skills in recognizing hazardous materials, and handling and storing them safely, as well as procedures to mitigate the risks of such materials Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  13. 13. Security Awareness Training • Required of all hazmat employees; • Provides employees information on security risks that could compromise their safety and of the public as they transport hazardous materials from one point to another. The training provides techniques on how to mitigate and respond to these security risks. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  14. 14. In-Depth Security Training • Is required of security personnel manning a hazmat facility as well as security managers and hazmat employees that work under the requirements of a security plan or are tasked to implement a security plan. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration
  15. 15. Types of Hazardous Materials • • • • • Hazardous materials, according to the US Department of Transportation, are divided into nine classes, namely: Class 1: Explosives Class 2: Gases Class 3: Flammable Liquid and Combustible Liquid Class 4: Flammable Solid, Spontaneously Combustible, and Dangerous When Wet Class 5: Oxidizer and Organic Peroxide U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  16. 16. • Class 6: Poison (Toxic) and Poison Inhalation Hazard • Class 7: Radioactive • Class 8: Corrosive • Class 9: Miscellaneous • Class 10: Dangerous U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  17. 17. Reporting Hazardous Material Information • Why do workers need to collect data from each vehicle that carries hazardous materials from your work premises? • Information you collect is used in risk assessment, management, and formulating emergency response procedures, according to the Department of Transportation. Moreover, it is also required by law. Vehicles loaded with hazardous materials should carry shipping papers that provide the HM Class and ID number and name of each hazardous material. U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  18. 18. Components of an Accident or Collision Report Supplement: Guide Questions (Wordings May Vary) 1. Does the vehicle have a hazardous material placard? Yes or No
  19. 19. • Placard Example: U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  20. 20. This question intends to determine whether a placarded hazardous material was actually released and not stolen from a transport container. Fuel or oil carried by the vehicle and used by the company is not considered cargo and need no reporting. U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  21. 21. 2. ENTER THE FOUR-DIGIT NUMBER (OR NAME) FROM THE PLACARD 1 9 9 3 The said four-digit number should be found on an orange panel or white square-on-point panel. If not present, then fill in the placard name. U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  22. 22. 3. ENTER THE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CLASS NUMBER FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE PLACARD 3 The Class number is composed of one or two digits and a decimal value. It is necessary for recognizing and examining hazardous materials type involved in accidents and spillage. U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  23. 23. 4. WAS HAZARDOUS CARGO RELEASED? YES NO This will help workers identify the cargo, and determine whether it has been released or not. When released, the cargo should have a placard placed on all sides of the containing vehicle. If placards were placed inside containers and packages within the vehicle, the vehicle itself should be marked on both sides and ends. U.S. Department of Transportation (www.fmcsa.dot.gov)
  24. 24. Sources: • Northeastern University. Office of Environmental Health and Safety. Web. (n.d.) December 2013 http://www.ehs.neu.edu/hazardous_material/hazardous_mat erial/ • “What You Should Know: A Guide for Developing a Hazardous Materials Training Program.” PHMSA.DOT.gov: U.S. Department of Transportation. Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, n.d., Web. December 2013. <http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/staticfiles/PHMSA/Downloadable Files/Developing_HMT_Program_Guide.pdf>
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