Santiago Meja Dugand
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Santiago Meja Dugand

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    Santiago Meja Dugand Santiago Meja Dugand Presentation Transcript

    • Megacities, megaproblems:a contextual approach to environmental technology Santiago Mejía Dugand PhD Candidate SymCity Norrköping, October 13-14 2011 1
    • What is a Megacity?A city with more than 10 million inhabitants. 2
    • There were 2 megacities in 1950 3 in 1975 9 in 1985 18 in 2000 20 in 2005And there will be 22 in 2015 (17 in the developing world) Source: UN Some classical examples (metropolitan areas) •Tokyo (34,300,000) •Guangzhou (25,200,000) •Seoul (25,100,000) •Shanghai (24,800,000) •Delhi (23,300,000) •Mumbai (23,000,000) •Mexico City (22,900,000) Source:citypopulation.de 3
    • The role of cities in today’s world More than 50% of the Few countries left with less thanworld’s population lives in cities 50% urban population (around 7% in megacities) Source: The Guardian Source: UN 4
    • Cities keep growing. 600 cities generate 60% In particular in developing countries. Of the world’s GDP An estimation of 200,000 peopleMigrate everyday from rural to urban areas Around the world 5
    • Cities facilitate…Jobs Health care Basic services Security attention Education Entertainment 6
    • But also face big challengesFood shortage Air pollution Water provision Mobility Fossil fuel Overcrowdingdependency Waste Gentrification management 7
    • Can technology ”save” these cities? 8
    • Not by itself, isolated from deeper problems (context) 9
    • When talking about sustainability, there has to be a conscious,social and technical assessment of the roots of the problem(s) 10
    • Technology implementation has to go hand-to-hand with the stakeholders training.A good solution can be meaningless 11
    • Having a solution does not necessarily mean commercial success 12
    • The same solution might work differently under different contexts... 13
    • Each particular case deserves special attention! To innovate is also to find innovative uses 14
    • The case of transportation in LA 10:1 in costs (compared to a metro) 4:1 compared to a light train Takes shorter time to implement Uses most of the existing infrastructure Dedicated lanes Flexible (possibility to overtake) Works "like a metro" Big coverage "Outside-the-bus" collection system Centralized management 15
    • In less than ten years 16
    • The case of Cleaner Production dissemination Concepts face several barriers: "Rich owners, poor companies" Non existing/poor regulation Bribes Informal economy (parallel production) Poor communication of incentives (when they exist) 17
    • A disfunctional triple helix Academia IndustryGovernment 18
    • The need and search for competitiveness andattraction of foreign investment in transitional cities (over environmental concerns) 19
    • The discomfort (aversion) of getting foreign-dependent, because of the fear of a new "technological colonialism".Expensive spare parts and support. Long waiting times (more costs) 20
    • Utopian views and their incompatibility (e.g. “holistic solutions") "Beautiful, but it wont work here" 21
    • Difference in concepts (andrealities) of what sustainabilityis and means for each culture or geographical area. 22
    • The fear (and risk)of losing local knowledge. 23
    • Thank you! 24
    • (By the way, during these 20 minutes,cities around the world have 2800 more inhabitants) 25