Regional Network
Development –
Lessons from the
Field
CSLNet STEM Summit –
Engineering Action for
Change
February 4, 2014
East Bay STEM Network Vision and Goals


Vision – A leadership hub for regional stakeholders working
together to improve ...
Gateways East Bay STEM
Network Infrastructure
Steering
Committee
Co-Chairs
Leroy M. Morishita,
President, CSUEB
Alex Zwiss...
Steering Committee Role
 Leadership
 Communications
 Fundraising
 Policy/Advocacy
 Data
Cradle to Career Approach: Addressing STEM
Challenges Along the P-20 Education Continuum

Early Years

K-12

Upper
Grades
...
Action Group Participation
 Membership




All sectors represented
Geographically diverse
All who want to be active pa...
5 Strategies for Gateway’s Action Groups








Understand the challenges students face and
existing research-based ...
Launching Action Group #4 – College and
Career Pathways
 Understand

the challenges students face and
existing research-b...
High school ‘linked learning’ and transitions to
colleges, universities and work






120,000 high school students att...
Launching Action Group #4 – College and
Career Pathways


Inspire more to act to increase
student/educator support


Com...
Support for pathway quality
Level

Activity
•

•

Regional

District /
Community

School /
Pathway

•

Assure that pathway...
College and Career Pathways – A Sample
Project
 Challenge:

A clearly articulated pathway and
support system for students...
College and Career Pathways – Engineering
Pathways Pilot Project
GOAL: To create a seamless transition for students from h...
College and Career Pathways – Engineering
Pathways Pilot Project
Project Overview:
 On-Line Engineering Course from Brown...
5 Strategies for Gateway’s Action Groups








Understand the challenges students face and
existing research-based ...
Action Group Elements
 Engaged

Leaders and Participants
 Co-designed Framework for Action (3-5 years)
 One Year Implem...
Contact Information
Gateways East Bay STEM Network
Bruce Simon, Associate Director
bruce.simon@csueastbay.edu
510-885-7319
Regional Network Development: Lessons from the Field
Regional Network Development: Lessons from the Field
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Regional Network Development: Lessons from the Field

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2014 California STEM Summit

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  • BRUCEAsk attendees what they hope to learn from the session – likely to be a very diverse audience.# leading and/or starting an emerging network# participating in a network# just curiousLessons- how we are organized and the strategies we use in our action groups
  • BRUCEFounded four years ago at CSUEB with grant from STRIVE. Originally conceived as a Collective Impact project focused on broad health and education issues in three counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo.Two years of meetings. Lots of talk and no action. Members became restless. Reoriented project with a more narrow focus and commitment to action. Restructured organization. Reduced geographic scope. Focus on STEM.The Gateways East Bay STEM Network serves as a leadership hub for regional stakeholders working together to improve educational outcomes in STEM across Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. We have three goals …………
  • BRUCEThe network consists of 1) a Steering Committee with key stakeholder groups represented including K12, higher education, business, foundations, science centers, and numerous non-profits, 2) four action groups focused on early STEM learning ages 0-8, learning opportunities in out-of-school settings, professional learning communities for formal and informal educators and students working to become teachers, and a new group focused on college/career pathways and transitions to two and four year colleges/universities. All groups are supported by core backbone staff.
  • BRUCECreates a commitment to stakeholder alignment at a global level. Detailed activity is in the Action Groups.
  • BRUCEThe four action groups grew out of shared understanding developed as stakeholders in our region analyzed research and data about our students, the challenges they face, and ways of helping students overcome STEM challenges.Cradle to Career approach.
  • BRUCEMembership – big tent, diverse representation is essential for balanced perspectives and alignment of objectivesCompeting Interests – significant challenge – essential to build shared understanding – common goals – move from “you” to “we”Leadership – community member/s – participants have enough status to effect individual organizations and sectors
  • BRUCEFive strategies are regularly employed as partners work together in the action groups. Work toward systemic change. Move beyond isolated, unsustainable programs to regional solutions.
  • PAMStrategies enacted simultaneously, inseperable
  • PAMVery detailed analysis of existing programs (assets)ROP data as reported by Contra Costa County Office of Education, Oakland Unified School District, Eden Area ROP, Mission Valley ROP, and Tri Valley ROP in 2013.ROP STATS ANALYSIS:ROP/CTE serves 21,861 high school students across the two counties (about 18% of the 120,000 high school students total)CCCOE ROP serves 10,700 HS students totalOUSD serves 2,814Eden Area ROP serves 3,282Mission Valley ROP serves 3,603Tri Valley ROP serves 1,460 90% of comprehensive high schools have ROP classes on siteSome through the ROP Centers (Granada, Foothill)Some not (Encinal and Alameda High)Middle College HS
  • PAMAnalysis of predicted job growth in region – looked for alignment with programsChart from the East Bay Economic Development Alliance’s Special Report on the East Bay Workforce, 2013.
  • PAM“Boiled up” from detailed analysis – example of information the informed our framework for action for the next 3-5 years
  • JULIE
  • JULIEExample of cross-sector dialogs emerging from action group members and ideas bubbling up for the framework
  • APRIL
  • APRIL
  • APRIL
  • BRUCEFive strategies are regularly employed as partners work together in the action groups.
  • BRUCENetwork behavior – call from Carol Tang, participation requests, increasing membership and participation, press, unsolicited inquiries and requests
  • Regional Network Development: Lessons from the Field

    1. 1. Regional Network Development – Lessons from the Field CSLNet STEM Summit – Engineering Action for Change February 4, 2014
    2. 2. East Bay STEM Network Vision and Goals  Vision – A leadership hub for regional stakeholders working together to improve educational outcomes in STEM across Alameda and Contra Costa Counties  Goals  Build a network that connects employers, educators, policymakers, funders and businesses to leverage STEM assets and develop new capacity to innovate, scale and sustain effective teaching and learning through collaboration and resource-sharing  Increase interest and competencies among all K-16 students in STEM disciplines, with an emphasis on critical thinking, hands-on learning, problem-based approaches and the use of information technologies  Ensure all students are college and career ready and increase the number of students pursuing STEM-related degrees and careers
    3. 3. Gateways East Bay STEM Network Infrastructure Steering Committee Co-Chairs Leroy M. Morishita, President, CSUEB Alex Zwissler, CEO and ED, Chabot Space and Science Center 60 members Diverse Stakeholders Two County Representation Stakeholder Participants Four Action Backbone Staff Stephanie Couch Director, Ph.D. Bruce Simon Associate Director Beth Yeager Contract Lead Communications Researcher Valorie Robles Admin. Assistant Community-At-Large ~ 250 Members Groups: -Early STEM Learning -STEM in OST -STEM PLC -STEM College/Career Pathways
    4. 4. Steering Committee Role  Leadership  Communications  Fundraising  Policy/Advocacy  Data
    5. 5. Cradle to Career Approach: Addressing STEM Challenges Along the P-20 Education Continuum Early Years K-12 Upper Grades All Grades • Early numeracy – key to future success in Algebra & mathematics required for STEM • Expansion of STEM learning opportunities via afterschool & summer (STEM in OST) • STEM college and career pathways for high school students and transitions to colleges, universities & work • Professional learning communities for STEM educators, pre-service teachers, and partners
    6. 6. Action Group Participation  Membership    All sectors represented Geographically diverse All who want to be active participants are welcome  Competing  interests and diverse perspectives Building shared knowledge and language  Leadership
    7. 7. 5 Strategies for Gateway’s Action Groups      Understand the challenges students face and existing research-based solutions Map and increase the visibility of STEM assets Inspire more to act to increase student/educator support Connect and align investments strategically to increase impact/reach and improve outcomes Research (key indicators +) and learn as we go
    8. 8. Launching Action Group #4 – College and Career Pathways  Understand the challenges students face and existing research-based solutions  Map and increase the visibility of STEM assets
    9. 9. High school ‘linked learning’ and transitions to colleges, universities and work    120,000 high school students attending 66 schools in 25 school districts. - Roughly 40% served by 71 CA Partnership Academies (50% STEM oriented) 21,861 (18%) participating in Regional Occupational Centers/Programs offered by 4 JPAs. (50% STEM oriented) 60 ‘linked learning’ pathways in 6 districts (Oakland, West CC, Antioch, Pittsburg, Mt Diablo, San Lorenz0)
    10. 10. Launching Action Group #4 – College and Career Pathways  Inspire more to act to increase student/educator support  Communications    Connect and align investments strategically to increase impact/reach and improve outcomes     Organizations Represented on Steering Committee Public SB1070 Youth Career Connect Career Pathways Trust Research (key indicators +) and learn as we go
    11. 11. Support for pathway quality Level Activity • • Regional District / Community School / Pathway • Assure that pathway themes align with regional workforce and economic development needs Plan and conduct leadership development for district, school site and pathway leaders Recruit, select, and coordinate a community of coaches to support district, school site, and pathway leaders • • • • • Establish expectations for equity, access, rigor, and quality Manage student recruitment and pathway selection Establish local systems of assessment and accountability Lead professional development for pathway teachers Assure that master schedules support common planning time for pathway communities of practice • Through a continuous improvement process, address all areas of pathway development to reach and sustain a level of high quality
    12. 12. College and Career Pathways – A Sample Project  Challenge: A clearly articulated pathway and support system for students in PLTW high school programs to matriculate to CSUEB   Partners: CSUEB Engineering Faculty, Community College Faculty, High School Teachers, Contra Costa Economic Partnership Funder: Chevron U.S.A., Inc.
    13. 13. College and Career Pathways – Engineering Pathways Pilot Project GOAL: To create a seamless transition for students from high school Engineering Pathways to post-secondary education aligned with highwage, high-demand, high-skill careers in the East Bay Region. To increase persistence of PLTW students from high school to post-secondary certificate, two- and four-year degree programs. PARTNERS: CSU-East Bay Engineering Department Faculty; PLTW teachers in West Contra Costa, Mt. Diablo, Pittsburg and Antioch unified school districts; Contra Costa Economic Partnership STEM Workforce Initiative, Chevron Richmond Refinery.
    14. 14. College and Career Pathways – Engineering Pathways Pilot Project Project Overview:  On-Line Engineering Course from Brown University--In the spring, PLTW Engineering students at a variety of high schools in Contra Costa will be able to access an on-line engineering course  Ambassador Program--Third year CSU-EB Engineering students will be identified as PLTW Ambassadors and go into PLTW classrooms regularly to offer teacher support in delivering PLTW Engineering classroom units and providing mentoring support for students.  Summer College Engineering Experience--In the summer 2014, a one-week engineering-related summer camp for high school students and teachers (approximate 60 students and 10 teachers) at CSU-EB Hayward.
    15. 15. 5 Strategies for Gateway’s Action Groups      Understand the challenges students face and existing research-based solutions Map and increase the visibility of STEM assets Inspire more to act to increase student/educator support Connect and align investments strategically to increase impact/reach and improve outcomes Research (key indicators +) and learn as we go
    16. 16. Action Group Elements  Engaged Leaders and Participants  Co-designed Framework for Action (3-5 years)  One Year Implementation plan  Measurable Outcomes including evidence of network behavior in the early years
    17. 17. Contact Information Gateways East Bay STEM Network Bruce Simon, Associate Director bruce.simon@csueastbay.edu 510-885-7319
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