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Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
Uncommon resources for the Common Core
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Uncommon resources for the Common Core

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This was a presentation to the PAEC Leadership Conference, Summer, 2013.

This was a presentation to the PAEC Leadership Conference, Summer, 2013.

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  • 1. Ongoing training – not a one-stop-shot, set-n-get, stay-n-spray2. Marshal Web 2.0 – what websites could teachers use in order to collaborate with other professionals? Some examples: International Reading Association: www.reading.org; National Council of Teachers of English www.ncte.org3. $$ - What funds can the budget provide?4. Adequate vs. Best – “Adequate” is the enemy of “best.”
  • Note: Range of texts mentioned. Students should have vast experience with all kinds of nonfiction. I.e. biographies (typically written with specific or proper nouns . . . George Washington/he) vs. informational books about science topics (typically written with generic nouns and third-person plural pronouns. I.e. mammals/they.
  • Retrieved from: http://www.reading.org/Libraries/association-documents/ira_ccss_guidelines.pdf
  • National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010,
  • These address: identifying and understanding relationships between main points and supporting details.
  • These address: focusing on understanding unfamiliar words, using text features, and inferring an author’s purpose and perspective.
  • These address: students’ ability to interpret, analyze, and apply information from individual and across multiple texts.
  • These address: Students will independently and proficiently read and comprehend complex informational texts appropriate for the grade level across subject areas. Three parts to text complexity: qualitative evaluation of text, quantitative evaluation of the text, and matching reader to text and task
  • 50 Links for Common Corehttp://www.onlinecolleges.net/2012/06/27/50-important-links-for-common-core-educators/
  • This slide and next about Calkins’ information
  • I.e. Demonstrate the Mummy’s Curse Lesson Plan, as an example of the resources found in Calkins’ work.
  • Incredible resource for: articles about CCSS, annotated bibliographies for picture books and novels, related to CCSS.
  • Would not normally recommend a wikipedia page, but this one is full of information and resources.
  • Literacy Learning Exchange:Forty webinars related to the Common Core on this searched page.
  • Buehl, D. (2011). Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines. Newark, DE: International Reading Association.
  • Ideas: Graphic Organizers, Read-aloudsComprehension Checkdown (from the website):The Comprehension Check-Down provides students with a protocol for isolating knowledge gaps with a text and for systematically working through what they are able to understand and where they are stymied by lack of knowledge.The initial check-point is of critical importance. Because readers are strongly tempted to forego tackling texts that present a mismatch, students need to begin with an asset rather than deficit mind-set. Instead of a preoccupation with what they are not getting, this step encourages students to verbalize what they do understand.The second check-point is a fundamental comprehension strategy: inventorying personal knowledge that may have relevance to what the author is saying. Previous Reading Room columns have highlighted text-to-self connections (“this reminds me of something that has happened to me”); text-to-text connections (“I remember reading about this before”); and text-to-world connections (“this is how I understand things to be”).The third check-point prompts students to examine the author’s message for ‘hidden knowledge.’ Some of the hidden knowledge will appear obvious because a reader is able to connect personal knowledge to the author’s words. But when the author assumes reader knowledge that an individual does not possess, comprehension grinds to a halt. Again, students are asked to verbalize exactly what it is that they do not know that is implicit in a passage.The fourth check-point cues readers to evaluate the risk of continuing with knowledge gaps. Some passages will generally make sense, even if readers miss some of the author’s references. But in other spots, it will be evident that comprehension will be greatly compromised if the knowledge gaps are not addressed. Readers need to take notice of these spots, even if they decide it is best to move on and look for clarification in the rest of the passage. Some spots will warrant a return sweep for further deliberations.The fifth check-point asks students whether they ‘recognize’ the unknown information. Is the missing knowledge something they have seen before? Two possible courses of action might present themselves. First, student may recognize that the author has previously covered this information, perhaps in an earlier chapter. A quick look-back to review can rectify this knowledge gap. Secondly, a reader may have forgotten learning from a past course. In this case, a reader will need to determine an accessible source for a revisit of this material.The sixth and seventh check-points encourage inferential thinking. Inferences are possible when readers combine their prior knowledge with textual information to develop hypotheses about what an author might be saying. Clearly, understandings of these portions of a text may be imperfect, but inferential thinking represents readers doing the best they can, with the knowledge they possess, to figure out possible meanings. Some of their inferences may prove consistent with what an author subsequently tells them, and some may unfold as improbable as they encounter more of the text.
  • Classroom Ideas: Semantic word maps (highlighting connections between texts and words) and Discussions (genuine) and Text Features (lessons, walks, etc.)From Doug Buehl’s website: http://www.weac.org/news_and_publications/education_news/2007-2008/readingroom_generative.aspxTeaching vocabulary strategies that help students detect meaningful word parts is referred to as generative vocabulary instruction — students become skilled in generating possible meanings of a string of new words based on their knowledge of roots and affixes. Templeton (2008) recommends several steps for generative vocabulary instruction.Step 1: Start with the basic premise that “if you learn one word, you actually learn ten.” Let’s return to one of our opening examples. When students learn the word convert, they have in effect also learned converts, converted, converting, converter, converters, and unconverted, a natural byproduct of their encountering these forms of the word in their reading. However, Templeton cautions that other less familiar forms may be overlooked by students, and should also be displayed when students are learning a useful ‘base’ word like convert: convertible, convertibility, convertibleness, inconvertible, inconvertibility, unconvertible, reconvert, reconvertible. If the teacher does not intentionally include these words in the conversations about convert, then many students will not notice their relationship to a word they have come to know. As a result, students are more likely to skip the word as “too hard” when they encounter reconvert in a text, even though they have constructed sufficient knowledge about the ‘base’ word to successfully hypothesize a probable meaning.As students examine the variations on how convert might appear in a larger word, ask them to apply knowledge of suffixes and prefixes to speculate on possible meanings of these more sophisticated forms. In addition, use the opportunity to teach the root in the base word—in this case “vert” which means “to turn.” So if convert means “to turn something into something else,” then convertible can be explained as “something that is capable of being turned into something else.”A highly useful web resource for generative vocabulary instruction is onelook.com. Teachers can quickly generate lists of words that share the same base word or root that can be then integrated into word study lessons. (For example, *convert* yielded 29 common words that contain convert, and *vert* listed well over 300, some of which bore no relationship to “to turn” but most of which did meaningfully share this Latin root.) Step 2: Next, take frequent opportunities to model vocabulary problem-solving using knowledge of a key base word and root. Here is another example of a potentially difficult word for students:The negotiations finally were called to a halt because both sides proved to be intractable.Templeton recommends modeling a four-step analysis procedure for tackling new words like intractable:First, ask yourself if there are any prefixes or suffixes (parts added to the beginnings and ends of words). If you find some, take them off (erase in and able):Second, notice what is left. In this case, the long word is built around the root tract. Ask yourself what you know about this base word or root. Where have you seen it before?Third, think of a familiar key word that contains that word part: tract. How about tractor? You know that a tractor “pulls things.”Fourth, put the affixes back on—the suffix and the prefix. Develop your hunch about the word’s meaning, and see if the sentence makes sense. Sometimes, you may need to study more than just the sentence—you may need to read over the entire paragraph or think about the topic or main idea of the whole passage. In this case intractable seems to be a word that has something to do with “not being pulled,” which makes sense because the negotiations were stopped, so it seems that neither side could be “pulled” into an agreement.Step 3: As an integral component of generative vocabulary instruction, be constantly on the lookout for meaningful key words, already known to students, that can be used as automatic problem-solving prompts. In our opening example, the familiar word convert is a valuable key word for students to use when analyzing new words that contain the root “vert.” Likewise, tractor (something that pulls) is a useful key word when analyzing any of the following more unfamiliar terms: traction, contracted, retraction, contractual, extractible, protracted, subcontractor, and so on. When teaching a new word, Templeton recommends pairing it with the familiar key word as students examine it, to continually establish the strategy of using recognizable words as tools for developing meaningful hunches about words students may find challenging. For example, notice how the meaningful key word fracture (to break) can be used as a tool to problem solve these more sophisticated forms: fractionate, fractious, refraction, fracas, infraction. Or how correct (right) can be paired when students learn rectify, rectitude, or rectangle. As students become practiced with using key words as a vocabulary analysis tool, ask them to identify their own key words that can signal possible meanings of future unknown words. Notice that words with meaningful parts appear as key vocabulary in a wide variety of subject areas (referred to in previous Reading Room columns a Tier 3 words). For example, fractionate (as in a country fractionating) may surface in social studies texts. Refraction is a science concept, fraction a math concept, infraction a physical education concept, and fractious could be employed to describe a character in a short story or novel. It is therefore incumbent on all teachers to take advantage of the daily opportunities for generative vocabulary instruction in their curriculum.
  • Classroom Ideas: Thinking across texts by using graphic organizers and discussions. Considering authors’ points of view.Graphic from: http://books.google.com/books?id=M6H88sHn7RIC&pg=PA286&lpg=PA286&dq=review+new+charts+Buehl&source=bl&ots=d3UBT02nNU&sig=PWlMGwkC8KthbjTvr3Ku5RdLu0o&hl=en&sa=X&ei=AR3kUeMZiuutAa_VgdAH&ved=0CC0Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
  • This was CNN article on Trayvon Martin results. Retrieved 7.15.13
  • Most of these resources are compiled on my Scoop.It link: http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-by-susan-wegmann
  • Transcript

    • 1. Un-Common Resources for the Common Core: School-wide Ideas to Bridge the Informational Text and Disciplinary Literacy Gap Dr. Susan Wegmann Baptist College of Florida PAEC Leadership Conference July 18, 2013 - 10:55 – 11:55 All resources found on http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-by-susan-wegmann Presentation found on SlideShare: www.slideshare.net/swegmann E-mail: sjwegmann@baptistcollege.edu
    • 2. Successful Common Core Instruction 2Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 3. Barriers to Success for Common Core? 3Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 4. Bridges to Success for Common Core? Success Inservice Resources Willingness 4Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 5. School-wide Implementation School-wide Buy-In 5Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 6. School-wide Implementation 6Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 7. “This session will highlight outstanding resources for school-wide attention to the Common Core Reading: Informational Text standards. Participants will be given pertinent ideas to explain, enlighten, and help to teach the standards with a focus on school-wide implementation. Handouts will be provided.” 7Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 8. “To be ready for college, work force training, and life in a technological society, students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize, and report on information and ideas, to conduct original research in order to answer questions or solve problems, and to analyze and create a high volume and extensive range of print and non-print texts in media forms old and new.” (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010, p. 4) 8Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 9. (NGA Center and CCSSO, 2010, p. 31) Informational Text Literary Nonfiction and Historical, Scientific, and Technical Texts Includes biographies and autobiographies; books about history, social studies, science, and the arts; technical texts, including directions, forms, and information displayed in graphs, charts, or maps; and digital sources on a range of topics. 9Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 10. From International Reading Association: LITERACY IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE FOR THE ELA Common Core State Standards Summary of Recommendations for Disciplinary Literacy: • Involve content area teachers in teaching the Disciplinary Literacy Standards. • Teach students the literacy strategies that are pertinent to each discipline. • Provide appropriate professional learning opportunities for teachers in the literacy practices appropriate for their disciplines. 10Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 11. Anchor Standard #1 “Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly” (p. 10) NOT: What you already know NOT: What you think you know NOT: What you feel This is Textual analysis, not personal response. 11Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 12. Literary vs. Informational Texts By Grade 4 • 50% Literary Texts • 50% Informational Texts By Grade 8 • 45% Literary Texts • 55% Informational Texts By Grade 12 • 30% Literary Texts • 70% Informational Texts 12Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 13. Craft and Structure Key Ideas and Details Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Common Elements, Grades K-12 15Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 14. Key Ideas and Details Kindergarten: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text, with prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text, and with prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. Grade 5: Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text, determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text, and explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text based on specific information in the text. Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida 16
    • 15. Key Ideas and Details Grade 8: Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text; Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text; and analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories). Grade 11-12: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain; determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text; and analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. 17Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 16. Craft and Structure Kindergarten: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text,” identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book, and name the author and illustrator of a text and define the role of each in presenting the ideas or information in a text. Grade 5: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 5 topic or subject area, compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts, and analyze multiple accounts of the same event or topic, noting important similarities and differences in the point of view they represent. 18Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 17. Grade 8: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts; analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences in developing and refining a key concept; and determine an author‟s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how the author acknowledges and responds to conflicting evidence or viewpoints. Grades 11-12: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10); analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.; and determine an author‟s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text. Craft and Structure 19Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 18. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas Kindergarten: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts), With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text, and with prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in illustrations, descriptions, or procedures) Grade 5: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently, Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text, identifying which reasons and evidence support which point(s), and Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.” 20Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 19. Grade 8: Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea; delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is sound and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; recognize when irrelevant evidence is introduced; and analyze a case in which two or more texts provide conflicting information on the same topic and identify where the texts disagree on matters of fact or interpretation. Grades 11-12: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem; delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses); analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln‟s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 21Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 20. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity Kindergarten: Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding. Grade 5: By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the grades 4–5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. 22Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 21. Grade 8: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. Grades 11-12: By the end of grade 11, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 11-CCR text complexity band independently and proficiently. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 23Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 22. General Nonfiction/ Common Core Web resources Common Core State Standards and Appendices: www.corestandards.org/the- standards – Appendix A: Research Supporting Key Elements of the Standards and Glossary of Key Terms – Appendix B: Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks – Appendix C: Samples of Student Writing 24Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 23. General Nonfiction/ Common Core Web resources Teacher‟s College Reading and Writing Project • Videos: http://vimeo.com/album/2192389 • Lesson plans, aka “How to‟s and Guides” • Advice related to nonfiction texts: “If your instruction in reading has focused primarily on fiction, your school will need to shift to a balance between fiction and informational reading. Students need to move up the levels of text difficulty to read at grade-level text complexity in all genres.” (Calkins) 25Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 24. Supplemental Lesson Guides for Navigating Nonfiction, Lucy Calkins http://icsdk- 5literacy.wikispaces.com/A+User%27s+Guide+to+Lucy+Calkins%27+Reading+Units+of+Study+Grad es+3-5 26Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 25. CPALMS: Florida‟s platform for educators to Collaborate, Plan, Align, Learn, Motivate, and Share • http://www.cpalms.org/resources/ResourceS earch.aspx 27Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 26. Common Core Curriculum Maps http://commoncore.org/maps/resources/digital_resources 28Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 27. Booklist Online CCSS resources http://booklistonline.com/GeneralInfo.aspx?id=68&AspxAutoDetectCoo kieSupport=1 29Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 28. Pearson Publishing Co. Webinars on CCSS http://commoncore.pearsoned.com/index.cfm?loc ator=PS1sF6 23 Webinars on English/Language Arts alone 30Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 29. Common Core State Standards Initiative Wiki • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Core_State_Stand ards_Initiative 31Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 30. Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC) LDC offers a framework and classroom-ready modules for building the college-and-career-ready literacy skills specified by the Common Core State Standards. http://www.literacydesigncollaborative.org 32Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 31. The Teaching Channel - Videos https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos ?categories=topics_common-core 33Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 32. Achieve the Core http://www.achievethecore.org/ 34Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 33. Literacy in Learning Exchange http://www.literacyinlearningexchange.org/fs_resource_case/results/co mmon%20core 35Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 34. Wisconsin Education Association Council: Reading Room A series of articles written by Doug Buehl, adolescent literacy consultant, Madison, Wisconsin http://www.weac.org/news_and_publications/columns/reading_room/in dex.aspx 36Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 35. Key Ideas and Details: Comprehension Checkdown 1. What does the author tell me that I do understand? 2. What connections can I make to my personal knowledge? 3. What does the author expect me to already know? 4. How does „not knowing‟ impact my understanding? 5. What don‟t I know that I „should know‟? 6. What hunches do I have about what something might mean? 7. What are some things I might be able to figure out? 8. Where can I turn to get the information I need to understand this author? http://www.weac.org/news_and_publications/education_news/2007- 2008/readingroom_inform.aspx 37Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 36. Craft and Structure: Generative Vocabulary Instruction Step 1: Start with the basic premise that “if you learn one word, you actually learn ten.” Focus on the root word. Web resource: onelook.com Step 2: Next, take frequent opportunities to model vocabulary problem-solving using knowledge of a key base word and root. Step 3: As an integral component of generative vocabulary instruction, be constantly on the lookout for meaningful key words, already known to students, that can be used as automatic problem-solving prompts. 38Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 37. Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Review/New Chart 39Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 38. Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity: Online Utility http://www.online-utility.org/english/readability_test_and_improve.jsp Number of characters (without spaces) : 2,213.00 Number of words : 436.00 Number of sentences : 26.00 Average number of characters per word : 5.08 Average number of syllables per word : 1.67 Average number of words per sentence: 16.77 Indication of the number of years of formal education that a person requires in order to easily understand the text on the first reading Gunning Fog index : 13.31 Approximate representation of the U.S. grade level needed to comprehend the text : Coleman Liau index : 12.31 Flesch Kincaid Grade level : 10.71 ARI (Automated Readability Index) : 10.86 SMOG : 13.19 40Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 39. Resources for Leadership and the Common Core 1. Central Carolinas Regional Education Service Alliance: http://www.ccresa.net/common-core-resources/leadership-and-the- common-core/ 2. Mel Ridile, Secondary Principal Scoop It Page: http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-resources-for-school- leaders?sc_source=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nassp.org%2Fknowledge- center%2Ftopics-of-interest%2Fcommon-core-state-standards 3. Common Core Toolkit for Principals: http://www.geraldaungst.com/blog/2012/12/common-core-toolkit-for- principals-part-1/ 4. Common Core Institute: Priorities for Principals http://commoncoreinstitute.org/principalpriorities.aspx 5. National Association of Elementary School Principals: Implementation Guide: http://www.naesp.org/communicator-january-2013-final/twelve-key- common-core-shifts-action-steps-principals 41Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 40. For cost, from Education Week Leadership Forums: Road Maps to the Common Core: http://www.edweekevents.org/common-core-success- virtual/register/?intc=EM-EVNT-7.16 $99 includes: • eBook The Education Week e-book Implementing Common Standards: How School Districts Are Preparing for the New Math and Reading Standards • The Education Week Spotlight on the Common Core • A certificate of completion • Access to videos for 3 months, may use them for school- wide in-service training 42Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 41. References Beck, I., McKeown, M., Hamilton, R., & Kucan, L. (1997) Questioning The Author: An Approach For Enhancing Student Engagement With Text. International Reading Association, Newark, DE. Buehl, D. (2011). Developing Readers in the Academic Disciplines. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Calkins, L., Ehrenworth, M., & Lehman, C. (2012). Pathways to the Common Core: Accelerating Achievement. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Kucan, L., & Palincsar, A. S. (2013). Comprehension Instruction Through Text- based Discussion. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Book and DVD. McLaughlin, M., & Overturf, B. J. (2013) The Common Core: Teaching K-5 Students to Meet the Reading Standards. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers. (2010). Common Core State Standards for English language arts and literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. Washington, DC: Authors. Retrieved from http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf Neuman, S., & Gambrell, L. B. (2013). Quality Reading Instruction in the Age of Common Core Standards. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. 43Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 42. http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-by- susan-wegmann 44Dr. Susan Wegmann, Baptist College of Florida
    • 43. Un-Common Resources for the Common Core: School-wide Ideas to Bridge the Informational Text and Disciplinary Literacy Gap Dr. Susan Wegmann Baptist College of Florida PAEC Leadership Conference July 18, 2013 - 10:55 – 11:55 All resources found on http://www.scoop.it/t/common-core-state-standards-by-susan-wegmann Presentation found on SlideShare: www.slideshare.net/swegmann E-mail: Sjwegmann@baptistcollege.edu

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