Disciplinary Literacykeynotewegmann

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  • Strengthen reading instruction in all high school courses by incorporating complex reading materials into course content.The type of text to which students are exposed in high school has a significant impact on their readiness for college-level reading.Specifically, students need to be able to read complex texts if they are to be ready for college. All courses in high school, not just English and social studies but mathematics and science as well, must challenge students to read and understand complex texts.
  • From the National Reading Panel’s report: strong connection to vocabulary in the reading process (NICHD, p. 4-15). both direct and indirect vocabulary instruction should be used to achieve reading comprehension.Effective vocabulary instruction also requires active participation from students. Also recommended: Multiple exposures to words in both indirect and direct learning.Who better to teach vocabulary than content area teachers who know the content???!Blachowicz and Fisher (2005) suggest choosing the following kinds of words:Comprehension words (necessary for comprehending the subject or content)Useful words (practical across several fields)Academic words and phrases (such as “essential message” , “in contrast to”)Generative words (prefixes, suffixes, and roots that can be identified and applied to other words)
  • Vocabulary Frames are a flashcard method for learning new vocabulary. Do not use Vocabulary Frames for every vocabulary word encountered. Words that introduce new concepts are best used with Vocabulary Frames.Top Right Corner: Write the word’s definitionTop Left Corner: Write the word’s opposite and cross it outLower Left Corner: Write a silly sentence that uses the definition of the wordLower Right Corner: Draw a graphic to help you visualize the conceptIn the Center: Write the wordOther ideas for explicit placement on card:Isolate any prefixesIsolate the rootNote the meaning of the rootIsolate any suffixesLabel the part of speech in parenthesis
  • Webklipper: annotation and extractor for web pages: http://webklipper.com/k/KGyIAr0cga2AFVdooC4r Zooburst: pop up books: http://www.zooburst.com/zb_books-viewer.php?book=4c7d7e4911329Ten: LIFE has unveiled a neat new feature that lets you search for any photos in its archives and create an online timeline/slideshow that you can share with a unique url address. Their Photo Timeline lets you use their original captions or you can edit them and create your own, as well as writing your own description for your whole creation. After you log-in (you can do so using your Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo, or Google accounts — it would be nice if they allowed on site registration, but I guess you can’t have everything!), it’s just a matter of searching and dragging the photos to your timeline/slideshow. Nine: Crocodoc is a super-simple application that allows you to annotate webpages with virtual post-it notes and drawings. You can also upload any document you create and immediate make it into a webpage.Eight: WebKlipper lets you easily, without requiring registration, annotate any webpage with virtual post-it notes or a highlighter. You’re then given the url address of the annotated webpage. It’s quite easy to use. Students can use it to demonstrate reading strategies (visualizing, asking questions, making a connection, etc.).Seven: ZooBurst, allows you to create your own “customized 3D pop-up books.” You can see a number of examples at their site.Six: Fotobabble, is a neat application where people can post photos along with an audio description. It has gotten even better recently. Now, users can grab images off the web by just using the photo’s url address. Before, uploading images was the only option. It’s one of the best Web 2.0 applications of the year for educators, and is on The Best Sites To Practice Speaking English list. It’s a simple tool students can use to practice their speaking skills. It’s very easy to use but, just in case, Russell Stannard at the great Teacher Training Videos has posted a good video tutorial on how to use the app. You can see examples my students have created here.Five: Tripline is a great map-making application. You just list the various places you want to go in a journey, or a famous trip that has happened in history or literature, or a class field trip itinerary, and a embeddable map is created showing the trip where you can add written descriptions and photos. You can use your own photos or just through Flickr. Plus, you can pick a soundtrack to go with it as it automatically plays through the travels. Here are examples of the ride of Paul Revere and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. It’s super-easy to use, and the only tricky part is that you can’t add photos until after you create your trip and save it. That’s not a big deal, unless you couldn’t figure it out like me and had to contact the site.Four: Story Jumper is a new site that lets kids create their own story books. Online versions are free, and you can pay for hard copies. Registration is quick and easy. You can create your books from “scratch” or use one of several templates they have (one or two of them didn’t seem particularly intuitive to me, but most were fine, and the “scratch” version was certainly easy). They offer lots of easy “props” to integrate into the stories, and you can upload your own photos and type your own text. Once you’re finished, you can email the link to yourself and post it on a student/teacher blog or website.Three: TxtBear is a new and very useful web application that allows you to easily upload and document and immediately turn it into a webpage. A site like this is one is wonderful for students and others who are not very tech savvy. All they have to do is create a document in Word (including easily copying and pasting images into it), which they might be more familiar with, and easily turn it into a website. Students can upload papers they’ve written, as well. Then, they can just copy and paste its url address into a teacher or student blog. For example, now I have students type essays in a Word Document and then copy and paste them directly into the comments section of our class blog. With TxtBear, they use Word, illustrate it if they want, and then paste the link into the class blog. It makes the document much more readable that way.Two: The Middlespot Search Engine has made previous “The Best…” lists. Their new version is like an even easier and embeddableWallwisher. In other words, it’s a virtual bulletin board with virtual “stickies.” If you’re searching for an image, website, or video, though, you don’t necessarily have to copy and paste their url addresses (though you can) — if they are in the search results you just click on it to go into your “mashup” and it goes to it automatically. No registration is necessary, and you can collaborate with others.One: Simple Booklet is a great new tool that lets you create online books and reports that can be embedded or linked to by its url address. It’s free, you can grab images and videos off the web, and extremely simple to use. No registration is required. What’s not to like? Coincidentally, it’s also designed by Middlespot.
  • Disciplinary Literacykeynotewegmann

    1. 1. Disciplinary Literacy: Another Name for Teaching Texts While you are waiting for this session to begin, please type in the chat box: 1. Your name and position 2. The age of students you work with 3. Your comfort with teaching online 1
    2. 2. Disciplinary Literacy: Another name for Teaching Texts Dr. Susan Wegmann swegmann@mail.ucf.edu Council for Online Literacy Educators Inaugural Conference, November 18, 2010
    3. 3. 3 Agree/Disagree 1. Reading is a one-way road from text to person. 2. Most content area texts are written on grade level. 3. Learning language is a social activity.
    4. 4. 4 In every case, it is the reader who reads the sense. . .We read to understand, or to begin to understand. We cannot do but read. Reading, almost as much as breathing, is our essential function. Alberto Manguel, (1996). A History of Reading. NY: Viking.
    5. 5. 5 Disciplinary Literacy. . . “…requires an understanding of how knowledges are constructed and organized in the content area, an understanding of what counts as warrant or evidence for a claim, and an understanding of the conventions of communicating that knowledge” (Moje, Ciechanowski, Kramer, Ellis, Carrillo & Collazo, 2004, p. 45).
    6. 6. 6 LANGUAGE Building Blocks for Disciplinary Literacy
    7. 7. 7 LANGUAGE READING PROCESSES Building Blocks for Disciplinary Literacy
    8. 8. 8 LANGUAGE READING PROCESSES STRATEGIES Building Blocks for Disciplinary Literacy
    9. 9. 9 LANGUAGE READING PROCESSES STRATEGIES SUBJECT MATTER Building Blocks for Disciplinary Literacy
    10. 10. 10 Defining Disciplinary Literacy "Literacy is the state of being able to participate fully in a to-and-fro interplay between person and text.” “Disciplinary Literacy” then, is being literate in a particular discipline or content area.
    11. 11. 1.2 million students tested – only 51% labeled as “ready for college” 11
    12. 12. 12 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    13. 13. 13 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    14. 14. 14 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    15. 15. 15 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    16. 16. 16 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Ability to identify important information Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    17. 17. 17 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Ability to synthesize information using LER first, then external sources Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Ability to identify important information Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    18. 18. 18 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Ability to synthesize information using LER first, then external sources Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Ability to identify important information Ability to read visual/graphic information Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    19. 19. 19 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Ability to synthesize information using LER first, then external sources Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Knowledge of organizational patterns Ability to identify important information Ability to read visual/graphic information Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    20. 20. 20 Discipline Specific Literacy Skills Ability to synthesize information using LER first, then external sources Knowledge of content text structure Test taking ability Knowledge of specialized vocabulary Knowledge of organizational patterns Ability to identify important information Ability to read visual/graphic information Research skills Acknowledge the interplay between self and text
    21. 21. 21 Expert readers. . . • activate prior knowledge (LER) • set goals for reading • make predictions • self-monitor • construct the main idea • critique the text’s propositions • evaluate the structure of the text
    22. 22. 22 Disciplinary Reading Strategies Before Reading During Reading After Reading Anticipation Guides Choose 10 Anticipation Guides SQ3R QAR SQ3R Structural Analysis SQ3R RAP Read alouds RAP Written responses Alternative Texts Graphic Organizers Read alouds Scavenger Hunt QtA Reader’s Theatre Graphic organizers Read alouds Alternative Texts Interviews Text Sets Graphic Organizers Text Sets Semantic Feature Analysis In just 10 minutes. . . Digital Stories Read Encode Annotate Ponder Interviews WebQuests Text Sets WebQuests/Digital Stories
    23. 23. 23 Semantic Feature Analysis • • Democrat Republican Former Governor Former Vice- President 2 Full Terms in Office Still Living L. B. Johnson  –— –—  –— –— Nixon –—  –—  –— –— Ford –—  –—  –—  Carter  –—  –— –—  Reagan –—   –—  –—
    24. 24. 24 DIRECTED TEXT MARKING Instructor Directed Markings Type of Markings To Be Used Title circle Paragraphs number: 1, 2, 3, etc. (left margin) Paragraph summary main idea word or brief phrase (right margin) Challenging vocabulary words box: Location names bracket: [ ] People named in the story wavy line vvvvvvvvvvvvvvv Data that contains dates, asterisk numbers, distances or amounts; anything numerical Webklipper.com
    25. 25. Limited amount of vocabulary words per week. Explicit vocabulary instruction 25 Disciplinary Vocabulary Instruction
    26. 26. 26 Vocabulary Frame Antonym Definition Silly sentence with definition of word Graphic/Picture Word
    27. 27. 27 K.I.M. Key idea Information Memory clue Drought Little or no rain (picture) Coup Takeover of government by the military (picture)
    28. 28. 28 RAP: Paraphrasing • Read a paragraph • Ask yourself what is the main idea and what are important supporting details • Put the main idea and supporting details into your own words
    29. 29. 29 Concept Map of Learning Unit Unit Essential Question Examples/Steps/Vocab Unit Topic/Concept Major Concepts/Skills/Key Questions
    30. 30. 30 Written responses to text: Postcard/Letter to the (Textbook) Editor Student Authored Study Guides Textbook Chapter Rewrites Narrative about “Being there.” Journal or diary entries
    31. 31. 31 Written responses to text: (cont) Write a Memoir Sharing/Interactive writing Written dialogue Manga
    32. 32. 32 Strategic Activities Read Alouds
    33. 33. 33 Read Alouds WebQuests WIPs Strategic Activities
    34. 34. 34 Read Alouds WebQuests WIPs Text Sets Strategic Activities
    35. 35. 35 Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre WebQuests WIPs Text Sets Strategic Activities
    36. 36. 36 Strategic Activities Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre WebQuests WIPs Interviews Text Sets
    37. 37. 37 Strategic Activities Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre Alternative Texts WebQuests WIPs Interviews Text Sets
    38. 38. In just 10 minutes. . 38 Strategic Activities Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre Alternative Texts WebQuests WIPs Interviews Text Sets
    39. 39. In just 10 minutes. . Scavenger Hunt 39 Strategic Activities Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre Alternative Texts WebQuests WIPs Interviews Text Sets
    40. 40. In just 10 minutes. . Scavenger Hunt 40 Strategic Activities Read Alouds Reader’s Theatre Alternative Texts WebQuests WIPs Digital Stories Interviews Text Sets
    41. 41. 41
    42. 42. 42 Best Web 2.0 Applications for 2010 1. Sitehoover 2. Titan Pads 3. Clp.ly 4. Flisti 5. Send Shots 6. Simple Guide Tool 7. Copytaste 8. Twextra 9. Mappy Friends 10.Explorra
    43. 43. Best Web 2.0 Applications for 2010 11. Life’s Photo timeline 12. Crocodoc 13. WebKlipper 14. ZooBurst 15. Fotobabble 16. Tripline 17. Story Jumper 18. TxBear 19. Wallwisher 20. Simple Booklet 43
    44. 44. 44 Magic Wand Alternative Texts Read Alouds WebKlipper ZooBurst In just 10 minutes. . . WebQuests/ WIPs Interviews Digital Stories Scavenger Hunt
    45. 45. 45 I was more than a teacher. And less. In the . . . classroom you are a drill sergeant, a rabbi, a shoulder to cry on, a disciplinarian, a singer, a low-level scholar, a clerk, a referee, a clown, a counselor, a dress-code enforcer, a conductor, an apologist, a philosopher, a collaborator, a tapdancer, a politician, a therapist, a fool, a traffic cop, a priest, a mother-father-brother-sister-uncle- aunt, a bookkeeper, a critic, a psychologist, the last straw. Frank McCourt
    46. 46. 46 Miscellaneous Treats • Electronic Field Trips – Yellowstone National Park – http://www.windowsintowonderland.org/ • Google Earth (earth.google.com) • TeacherTube (www.teachertube.com)
    47. 47. 47 References Allington, R. (2002) You can’t learn much from books you can’t read. Educational Leadership, 60 (3). 16-19. Beck, I. L., McKeown, M. G., Hamilton, R. L., & Kucan, L. (1997).Questioning the author: An approach for enhancing student engagement with text. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Lewin, L. (2006). Reading response that really matters to middle schoolers. New York: Scholastic. Rasinski, T. (2000). Speed does matter in reading. The Reading Teacher, 54, 146–151. Scraper, K. (2006, May). What a character! Bringing out the best in your students through reader’s theater. Paper presented at International Reading Association, Chicago, IL. Retrieved August 9, 2007 from http://www.edwriter.com/downloads/2006_IRA_Handout.pdf Swanson, H.L. (1999). Instructional components that predict treatment outcomes for students with LD: Support for a combined strategy and direct instruction model. Learning Disability Research and Practice, 14(3), 129-140
    48. 48. 48 • Au, K. H. & Raphael, T. E. (2000). Equity and literacy in the next millennium. Reading Research Quarterly, 35, 170- 188. Pp. 178-18 • Bercaw, L., & Wegmann, S. (2003) Literature Discussions, Participant Stance, and the Discussion Filter American Reading Forum Yearbook of Proceedings, 2003. Available online: http://www.americanreadingforum.org/03_yearbook/html/Bercaw.htm • Bloom, B. (1975). Language development. In F. D. Horowitz (Ed.) Review of child development research, 4, (pp. 245-303). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. • Britton, J. (1993). Language and learning. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton/Cook. • Cazden, C. (1988). Classroom discourse. Portsmouth, NH: Heinneman. • Draper, R. J. (2002) Every teacher a literacy teacher? An analysis of the literacy-related messages in secondary methods textbooks. Journal of Literacy Research. • Find Articles at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3785/is_200210/ai_n9087467 • McCourt, F. (2005) Teacher Man. New York: Scribner. An excellent website for videos for content area teachers: http://school.discovery.com/teachers/archive/ • Mehan, H. (1979a) Learning Lessons. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. • Mehan, H. (1979b) What time is it, Denise?: Asking known information questions in classroom discourse. Theory into Practice, 18, 285-294. • Piaget, J. (1964). Six Psychological Studies. New York: Vintage. For more information about Piaget's work: www.piaget.org or perform a Google search. • Probst, R. (1987) Available online: http://www.ericdigests.org/pre-926/theory.htm • Rosenblatt, L. (1938/1983). Literature as exploration (4th ed.). New York; MLA. • Rosenblatt, L. (1994) The reader, the text, the poem. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press. • For a great article that examines the contribution of Rosenblatt to literary interpretation, see http://www.vccaedu.org/inquiry/inquiry-spring97/i11chur.html • Street, B. V. (1999). The meanings of literacy. In d. A. Wagner, R. L. Venezky, & B. V. Street (Eds.), Literacy: An international handbook. (pp. 34-42). Boulder, CO: Westview Press. • Taylor, B. M., & Beach, R. W. (1984). The Effects of Text Structure Instruction on Middle-Grade Students' Comprehension and Production of Expository Text. Reading Research Quarterly, Vol. 19, 2. pp. 134-146. • Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in Society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. For more information about Vygotsky's work: http://www.kolar.org/vygotsky/ or perform a Google search. • Wikipedia definition of Literacy • Wimsatt, W. K. (1954) The Verbal Icon: Studies in the Meaning of Poetry. Kentucky: University of Kentucky Press.
    49. 49. Disciplinary Literacy: Another name for Teaching Texts Dr. Susan Wegmann swegmann@mail.ucf.edu Council for Online Literacy Educators Inaugural Conference, November 18, 2010

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