Building a Connected Stance: Motivation and Engagement in Asynchronous Discussion Boards<br />Sloan-C Conference<br />Octo...
Face-to-face InteractionsInitial Research<br />Initiate, Respond, Evaluate (IRE) pattern (Mehan, 1979)<br />Connected vs. ...
Moves in Connected Exchange <br />Teacher<br />Students<br />* inquire<br />* reassure students<br />* encourage students ...
Comparison of moves in two interaction patterns<br />
What about online discourse?<br />How does structure influence the number and length of postings that students offer?<br /...
Four types of Online Interaction <br /><ul><li>learner-teacher
learner-content
learner-learner
learner-interface </li></ul>(Hillman, Willis, & Gunawardena, 1994).<br />
When students think deeply and engage fully with: <br />their reading<br />their peers <br />their teachers<br />the compu...
Disconnected Stance<br />“I have read your introduction and I am so pleased to be in this learning community with you. My ...
153 word initial posting<br />“Good job”<br />75 word initial posting <br />“Keep up the good work”<br />210 word initial ...
In answer. . . <br />Structuring discussion boards <br />Open<br />Experimental<br />3R - Respond, react, reply<br />Examp...
Data Sources<br />Discussion board entries, 2 universities, 2 graduate level reading courses, 32 students total<br />End o...
Codes of Moves<br />1 Introducing a new topic<br />2/3 Sharing opinion and/orSharing beliefs<br />4Connecting to other rea...
Moves across all 4 Discussion Boards<br />
McCauley’s Students<br />Wegmann’s Students<br />1050<br />650<br />15<br />5<br />20<br />5<br />400<br />50<br />
Quadrants for the Connected/Disconnected Spectrum<br />Number of words used<br />Number of Moves Enacted<br />
Implications<br />By promoting a Connected stance:<br />Transactional Distanceis decreased.<br />Social presenceis enhance...
Future Analysis and Implications for Practice<br />Role of Online Instructor<br />Explicit with moves?<br />Analyze the Mo...
Discussion board Rubric<br />
Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
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Building a Connected Stance: Motivation and Engagement in Asynchronous Discussion Boards Sloan C

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This presentation was delivered Oct. 29, 2009 at the Sloan C conference in Orlando. It presents a description of the Connected Stance and the moves that occur during the enactment of a connected stance.

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Building a Connected Stance: Motivation and Engagement in Asynchronous Discussion Boards Sloan C

  1. 1. Building a Connected Stance: Motivation and Engagement in Asynchronous Discussion Boards<br />Sloan-C Conference<br />October 29, 2009<br />Susan J. Wegmann, Ph. D.<br />swegmann@mail.ucf.edu<br />University of Central Florida<br />Joyce McCauley, Ph. D. <br />Sam Houston State University<br />mccauley@shsu.edu<br />
  2. 2. Face-to-face InteractionsInitial Research<br />Initiate, Respond, Evaluate (IRE) pattern (Mehan, 1979)<br />Connected vs. Disconnected stance<br />
  3. 3. Moves in Connected Exchange <br />Teacher<br />Students<br />* inquire<br />* reassure students<br />* encourage students to answer a question<br />* illustrate a topic with a personal experience<br />* initiate a topic<br />* move a discussion forward<br />* stop a discussion<br />* change topic<br />* agree and elaborate<br />* gauge students&apos; agreement/disagreement<br />* give information<br />* acknowledge answer<br />* joke<br />* inquire<br />* resist teacher&apos;s directions<br />* answer questions (both teacher&apos;s and other students&apos;)<br />* connect with other students<br />* agree/disagree with teacher or student<br />* express opinion<br />* initiate a topic<br />* clarify a topic<br />* self-correct<br />* joke<br />* Wonder<br />* Ask another question (to teacher and peer)<br />
  4. 4. Comparison of moves in two interaction patterns<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. What about online discourse?<br />How does structure influence the number and length of postings that students offer?<br />What was the substance of students’ responses in online asynchronous discussion boards?<br />3. How do the moves found in online discussions reveal a connected discourse?<br />
  7. 7. Four types of Online Interaction <br /><ul><li>learner-teacher
  8. 8. learner-content
  9. 9. learner-learner
  10. 10. learner-interface </li></ul>(Hillman, Willis, & Gunawardena, 1994).<br />
  11. 11. When students think deeply and engage fully with: <br />their reading<br />their peers <br />their teachers<br />the computer<br />And show deep, engaged, challenging interactions, we called this a connected stance.<br />Social Presence is enacted.<br />
  12. 12. Disconnected Stance<br />“I have read your introduction and I am so pleased to be in this learning community with you. My God bless your future endeavors”<br />
  13. 13. 153 word initial posting<br />“Good job”<br />75 word initial posting <br />“Keep up the good work”<br />210 word initial posting<br />“I like what you said”<br />64 word posting <br />“I agree with everything you said.”<br />
  14. 14. In answer. . . <br />Structuring discussion boards <br />Open<br />Experimental<br />3R - Respond, react, reply<br />Examples<br />Rubric<br />End with a question<br />
  15. 15. Data Sources<br />Discussion board entries, 2 universities, 2 graduate level reading courses, 32 students total<br />End of term survey (addressing each of the four types of interaction)<br />Informal interviews with students<br />Student evaluations<br />
  16. 16. Codes of Moves<br />1 Introducing a new topic<br />2/3 Sharing opinion and/orSharing beliefs<br />4Connecting to other readings<br />5 Connecting to their own experiences<br />6Connecting to their own classroom<br />7Connecting to their own thinking<br />8 Building rapport<br />9 Suggesting a new organizational theme<br />10 Revealing their own struggles<br />11 Responding to other peer’s question<br />12 Giving information<br />13 Giving advice<br />14 Connecting to previous thought<br />15 Questioning/Wondering<br />16 Giving an example<br />17 Sharing “grand idea” not related to own experience or own classroom<br />18 Challenging peer<br />19 Connecting to course content<br />20 Humor<br />
  17. 17. Moves across all 4 Discussion Boards<br />
  18. 18. McCauley’s Students<br />Wegmann’s Students<br />1050<br />650<br />15<br />5<br />20<br />5<br />400<br />50<br />
  19. 19. Quadrants for the Connected/Disconnected Spectrum<br />Number of words used<br />Number of Moves Enacted<br />
  20. 20. Implications<br />By promoting a Connected stance:<br />Transactional Distanceis decreased.<br />Social presenceis enhanced.<br />
  21. 21. Future Analysis and Implications for Practice<br />Role of Online Instructor<br />Explicit with moves?<br />Analyze the Moves on Bloom’s taxonomy<br />What pairs and trios are visible<br />Characteristics of students’ personalities/culture<br />
  22. 22. Discussion board Rubric<br />
  23. 23. Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
  24. 24. Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
  25. 25. Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
  26. 26. Discussion board Rubric (cont)<br />
  27. 27. References<br />Althaus, S.L. (1997). Computer-mediated communication in the university classroom: An experiementwith online discussions. Communication Education, 46, 158-174.<br />Anderson, T. (2003). Getting the mix right again: An updated and theoretical rational for interaction. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 4. (2). Retrieved on April 9, 2009 from http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/149/230<br />Bakhtin, M. (1986). The problem of speech genres. In M. Bakhtin (Ed.), Speech genres and other late essays. (pp. 60-102). Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.<br />Bloom, B. (1975). Language development. In F. D. Horowitz (Ed.) Review of child development research, 4, (pp. 245-303). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.<br />Brewer, S. & Klein, J. (2004). Small group learning in an online asynchronous environment. Chicago, IL: Association for Educational Communications and Technology. (ERIC Document Reproduction Services No. ED484997)<br />Burnette, G., & Buerkle, H. (2004). Information exchange in virtual communities: A comparative study. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 9(2). Retrieved June 14, 2006, from http://www.ascusc.org/jcmc/vol9/issue2/burnett.html.<br />Cazden, C. (1988). Classroom discourse. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.<br />Dewey, J. (1933) How We Think: A Restatement of the Relation of Reflective Thinking to the Educative Process. Boston: Heath.<br />Dillon, M. (1994). Using discussion in classrooms. Philadelphia: Open University Press.<br />Gunawardena, C. N., Lowe, C. A., & Anderson, T. (1998). Transcript analysis of computer-mediated conferences as a tool for testing constructivist and social-constructivist learning theories. In Distance learning ‘98. Proceedings of the annual conference on distance teaching & learning (pp. 139–145). EDRS document ED 422854.<br />Hull, D., & Saxon, T. (2009, April 1). Negotiation of Meaning and Co-Construction of Knowledge:AnExperimental Analysis of Asynchronous Online Instruction. Computers & Education, 52(3), 624-639. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ827663) Retrieved April 9, 2009, from ERIC database.<br />Juwah, C. (2009). Interactions in Online Education: Implications for theory and practice. NY: Routledge.<br />Jones, Q., Ravid, G., & Rafaeli, S. (2004, June). Information Overload and the Message Dynamics of Online Interaction Spaces: A Theoretical Model and Empirical Exploration. Information Systems Research, 15(2), 194-210. Retrieved April 9, 2009, doi:10.1287/isre.1040.0023<br />Lambright, L. (1995) Creating a Dialogue: Socratic Seminars and Educational Reform. The entity from which ERIC acquires the content, including journal, organization, and conference names, or by means of online submission from the author.CommunityCollege Journal, 65. (4). 30-34.<br />Lao, T., & Gonzales, C. (2005) Understanding online learning through a qualitative description of professors and students&apos; experiences. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 13 (3), 459-74.<br />
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