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Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk:
FOREST HEALTH

Timberline View Estates CWPP Meeting
Seventh Day Adventist Ch...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk:
FOREST HEALTH
Values at Risk to Wildfire Typically Include:
o

Number of liv...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates:
Piñon-Junip...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates:
Gambel oak ...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates:
Ponderosa P...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
What is Forest Health?
o

There are many descriptions of fores...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH

What is Forest Health? (continued)
o

More recent definitions...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Benefits of a healthy
forest include:
o

Clean Air and Water

...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Current Forest Conditions:
o

Aggressive fire suppression has ...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Human Activities that Impact Forest Health:
o

Population grow...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Consequences of Poor Forest Health: (continued)
o

Other publi...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Forest Management (Stewardship):
o

Forest management is the i...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Recommendations:
o

Strive to address the causes and not the s...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Recommendations: (continued)
o

Make information about forest ...
Desired Future Conditions and
Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH
Some Closing Thoughts:
o

A forest is dynamic, ever changing. ...
Contact Information:

Kent Grant
District Forester
Colorado State Forest Service
FLC 7233
1000 Rim Drive
Fort Lewis Colleg...
Healthy Forests,
Healthy Communities

Fireweed along Forest Road 611 on the San Juan National Forest in Dolores County.
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2014 Timberline Durango Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) - Forest Health

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Learn more about The Timberline Home Owners Association Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) Forest Health including desired future conditions and values at risk.

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Transcript of "2014 Timberline Durango Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) - Forest Health"

  1. 1. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Timberline View Estates CWPP Meeting Seventh Day Adventist Church, Durango, CO February 19, 2014 Kent Grant, District Forester Durango District, Colorado State Forest Service
  2. 2. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Values at Risk to Wildfire Typically Include: o Number of lives at risk o Number of residences and density o Other economic values – additional structures and facilities, watersheds, and municipal water supplies o Social Values – views, pets, livestock, livelihood, cultural, historic, and recreational resources, and others o Ecological values – biological diversity, wildlife habitat, T&E species, endemic species, soil, air, water quality, and ecosystem health
  3. 3. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates: Piñon-Juniper (Pinus edulis; Juniperus scopulorum, Juniperus osteosperma) oElevation range is 4,900 to 8,000 feet (Plains to Foothills Life Zones) oUsually occurs on lower, more arid sites below the Gambel oak zone. oAnnual precipitation typically 10-15 inches. oSagebrush a common understory species oCommonly Rocky Mountain juniper, but can be a mixture of RMJ and Utah juniper oOften requires strong winds to carry a wildfire, but then will burn very intensely oMajor Insects: Piñon ips (P), piñon pitch mass borer (P), western cedar bark beetle (J), juniper borer (J). oMajor Diseases: dwarf mistletoe (P), black stain root disease (P), Phoradendron mistletoe (J). Piñon-juniper woodland.
  4. 4. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates: Gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) oElevation range is 6,000 to 9,000 feet (Foothills to Montane Life Zones) oUsually occurs between PJ and cool, moist mixed conifer vegetative types oAnnual precipitation is typically 15-22 inches oImportant wildlife species oAnchors soil on steep hillsides City of Durango’s Twin Buttes Open Space oReadily reproduces by suckering (sprouts) from property. root system oMajor Insects: Gambel oak borer, gall forming insects, leafrollers oMajor Diseases: Anthracnose, leaf blister, root rot oFrost Damage: Often happens during cold snaps in spring after leaf emergence oDrought: Top kill
  5. 5. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Major Vegetative Types of Timberline View Estates: Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) oElevation range 5,800 to 9,800 feet (Foothills to Montane Life Zones) oAdapted to high temperatures and low moisture oHighly resistant to low-intensity fire oCommonly found on north and east aspects in its lower range, south and west aspects at higher elevations oShade intolerant, often occurring in even-aged stands oMany second growth (blackjack) stands in San Juan Basin area approximately 100 years old oSecond-growth stands are often overstocked oGamble oak is a common understory species in southwest Colorado oImportant timber species oMajor Insects: mountain and western pine beetles oMajor Diseases: dwarf mistletoe Mancos State Park north of Mancos in Montezuma County.
  6. 6. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH What is Forest Health? o There are many descriptions of forest health that vary depending upon perspective. o Often based on personal or group values and management objectives. o A perceived balance between natural ecological processes and human values. o Forest Health, like many modern issues, involves complex social, economic, and environmental interactions. Banded Peak Ranch SE of Pagosa Springs in Archuleta County.
  7. 7. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH What is Forest Health? (continued) o More recent definitions of forest health range between utilitarian (anthropocentric) and ecosystem (ecocentric) perspectives. o The utilitarian perspective emphasizes forest conditions which directly satisfy human needs, while the ecosystem perspective emphasizes the maintenance of sustainable ecosystems over the landscape. o “Consistency with objectives” is a theme common to both utilitarian and ecosystem definitions of forest health. Failure to meet objectives, stated by either human uses or ecological conditions, indicates an unhealthy forest. (From the paper: Forest Health from Different Perspectives; T.E. Kolb, M.R. Wagner, and W. W. Covington.)
  8. 8. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Benefits of a healthy forest include: o Clean Air and Water o Abundant Wildlife Habitat o Multitude of Forest Products o Variety of Outdoor Recreation Opportunities o Productive Range for Livestock o Pristine Wilderness Areas o Attractive Scenery o Resiliency and Less Susceptibility to Severe Wildfire, Forest Insects/Diseases San Juan National Forest northeast of Mancos in Montezuma County.
  9. 9. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Current Forest Conditions: o Aggressive fire suppression has interfered with fire’s natural role in the environment, particularly in fire-adapted forest ecosystems like the ponderosa pine type. o Build up of dead and live fuels due to years of fire suppression and lack of thinning/harvesting. o Stands frequently lack diversity and are largely homogeneous, comprised of trees of similar size and age classes. o Many stands are overstocked with tree tops in close proximity to each other, creating significant crown fire potential. o Stands are stressed by drought, longer and warmer summers (global warming?), and overcrowding. o Insect and disease problems are increasingly impacting overly crowded, aging stands. o Human development further taxes natural ecosystems and forest processes. o Higher likelihood of major, intense wildfires like the Missionary Ridge Fire of 2002 and the
  10. 10. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Human Activities that Impact Forest Health: o Population growth o Fragmentation of ecosystem o Construction damage o Pollution/toxins o Invasive species (plant and insect) o Improper forest management o Poor livestock grazing practices
  11. 11. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Consequences of Poor Forest Health: (continued) o Other public safety issues (floods, debris flows) and infrastructure. o Lower aesthetic values, quality of life. o Losses to economy, tourism industry. o Reduced property value and property tax revenue. o Poorer air and water quality. o Degraded wildlife habitat. damage to Ponderosa pine killed by western pine beetle east of Durango in La Plata County.
  12. 12. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Forest Management (Stewardship): o Forest management is the implementation of planned activities that improve and protect forest health, reduce wildfire danger, and protect other forest benefits. o Examples of forest management include: Commercial timber harvesting •Forest thinning (commercial and pre-commercial) •Prescribed fire (broadcast burns and pile burns) •Wildfire hazard mitigation/fuels treatments •Reforestation (natural, seeding, planting) o Other management activities, such as regulating development within fire-prone forest types may be equally effective in improving the condition of some forests. o Forest management is a tool to direct the forest toward a desired condition, and can be especially crucial within the wildland urban interface (WUI). Thinned ponderosa pine stand on private property on Haycamp Mesa in Montezuma County. Prescribed burn on private property on Haycamp Mesa east of Dolores.
  13. 13. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Recommendations: o Strive to address the causes and not the symptoms of forest health problems. Utilize available technical expertise. o Consider the potential impacts of decisions upon forest health, possible public safety consequences, and options for mitigation. o Adopt sound land use planning requirements for defensible space, wildfire hazard mitigation, and emergency access. o Avoid ordinances or regulations that prohibit or limit forest management options. o Support collaborative programs and initiatives that promote forest health, wildfire prevention, and hazard mitigation (i.e., FireWise Council of Southwest Colorado, FireWise Neighborhood Ambassadors, San Juan Tree Farmers, Forest Agriculture Property Tax Classification, and San Juan Public Lands and CSFS projects). o Promote implementation of defensible space and the use of firewise construction design and building materials, and CWPP’s, especially in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
  14. 14. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Recommendations: (continued) o Make information about forest health and wildfire hazard mitigation readily available to new and existing landowners and encourage application. o Support local forest industry and forestry service contracting businesses (i.e., wildfire mitigation companies).
  15. 15. Desired Future Conditions and Values at Risk: FOREST HEALTH Some Closing Thoughts: o A forest is dynamic, ever changing. Sometimes this change and imperceptible, and at other times very rapid o You can’t take a snapshot of a forest and expect it to remain over time. o If we don’t manage the forest then nature will do it for us, in a manner we would prefer. o A hands off, leave it to nature approach does not ensure array of ecosystem services upon which the depends. o If a wildfire impacting a subdivision can be limited to a less intense surface fire, many of the trees should survive and the area will still be an attractive place to reside. is very slow and cataclysmic. the same and perhaps not the broad public’s welfare McPhee Park on the San Juan National Forest northeast of Dolores in Montezuma County.
  16. 16. Contact Information: Kent Grant District Forester Colorado State Forest Service FLC 7233 1000 Rim Drive Fort Lewis College Campus Durango, CO 81301-3908 PH: 970-247-5250 FAX: 970-247-5252 E-Mail: kent.grant@colostate.edu http://www.csfs.colostate.edu
  17. 17. Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities Fireweed along Forest Road 611 on the San Juan National Forest in Dolores County.
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