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Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
Presentation Makeover Design Document
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Presentation Makeover Design Document

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  • 1. Suzie Rose IT 6710 Design Document Revision March 28, 2010 Multiple Intelligences Design Documentation Overview This presentation strives to help educators, trainers, and instructional designers deliver and create content that appeals to a variety of intelligences as outlined by Howard Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences. The presentation outlines the specifics of the theory and details each intelligence. The information is discussed from a specific perspective to help keep its goal in mind: Dr. Gardner’s theory guides us to alternatives in teaching. My goal is to inform a large audience, so the presentation is developed with the Ballroom style in mind, as outlined by Andrew Abela in Advanced Presentations by Design (2008, pp. 92). It contains colorful, vibrant, and attention-grabbing visuals, and aims to impart knowledge to the viewer without a presenter (Abela, 2008, pp.92). This presentation can stand alone or be integrated into a series of other presentations that are similar in topic. The original presentation that I’ve “made over” contains a strong definition of multiple intelligences. It includes definitions of each intelligence type and lists learning activities that will challenge and improve learning for each type. At the conclusion of each definition, it lists possible career interests for the respective intelligence type. Some existing issues that I plan to improve include the following: • There are no images, only bulleted text and a few charts, throughout the entire presentation. • The slides have too much information on each of them. • The color scheme is distracting from the content. • The presentation does not explain why multiple intelligences matter or how we can use them to improve the quality of learning; it’s an information dump. • It has a poor and inconsistent use of mechanics (to the extent of distraction). http://www.slideboom.com/presentations/132547/Multiple-Intelligence
  • 2. Audience My primary audience includes from educators, trainers, and instructional designers. My secondary audience is any individual of any age who has an interest in the topic. Therefore, the communication preferences of these individuals span all audience personality implications. (See Appendix A, Worksheet A.1a) Personality Type Typical Need How to meet typical needs Examples from the Presentation Introvert Time to reflect on information Provide information in advance Distribution techniques may vary depending on to whom I provide access, but I hope this is done as much as possible. Extrovert Interactive discussion Plan for lots of discussion / Q&A Discussion techniques may vary depending on to whom I provide access, but I hope this is done as much as possible. Sensor The facts and all the details Include all relevant facts and details I’ve woven a story-telling technique throughout facts and definitions throughout the presentation. Some examples of facts and details can be found: Slide 19 describes the point of Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences (to look at intelligence in different ways and areas). Slide 37 lists the different intelligences. Slide 39 breaks the different intelligences into every day terms. Slides 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, 54, and 56 lists facts about what certain types of learners are good at or what they need to excel. Slides 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, and 57 tell stories about students (of certain intelligence types) who thrive given the tools they need to succeed. Intuitor The big picture Provide an overview up-front The big picture is that we want to find what motivates students so they want to learn; this is written on slide 4. Thinker Principles involved, costs, benefits Identify principles, costs, and benefits The costs are implicitly peppered throughout the presentation. Statements such as, “A learner who excels in an area is not more intelligent overall than one who struggles.” (Slide 19) combined with, “Our culture focuses most of its attention on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence.” (Slide 25) and, “Dr. Gardner suggests we place equal attention on other types of intelligences …” (Slide 26) help audiences see that the cost is abandoning a system that we’re used to and comfortable with. The benefits presented in this presentation are best explained on slide 80, “It gives educators, trainers, and instructional designers more opportunities to make a topic intriguing.”
  • 3. Feeler To whom it is valuable State implication for the audience The implication for the audience is that focusing on all intelligences gives the world musicians, architects, naturalists, artists, etc. (Slides 26-34). Slide 84 is likely to appeal to Feelers the most, “Instead of one way to teach, think, dream, and live…we now have at least EIGHT!” Judger Conclusions Present conclusions up-front The conclusion is that we need to find students’ intelligence type. This is stated on slide 6. The rest of the presentation walks through the steps on how to get to that conclusion. Perceiver Alternatives List all alternatives considered A combination of the statements on both slides 25 and 81 best exemplify alternatives. Slide 25: “Our culture focuses most of its attention on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence.” Slide 81: “Traditional curriculum with a single form of assessment does not accommodate exploration and creativity.” Learning Objectives • Appeal to multiple intelligences as defined by Howard Gardner to better serve students, appeal to more diverse audiences, and keep learners with varying strengths engaged. • Deliver content in a creative and unrestricted manner to appeal to a variety of intelligences as outlined by Howard Gardner (audience: educators and trainers). • Design and create creative training materials that appeal to a variety of intelligences as outlined by Howard Gardner (audience: instructional designers). o Match multiple intelligences as defined by Howard Gardner to effective teaching methods. o Provide instruction that benefits more diverse audiences. o Engage learners with varying skills and strength by using teaching methods that are effective for varying multiple intelligences. Problem Our culture focuses most of its attention on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence. Traditional educational methods restrict creativity and don’t reach all learners. Reaching learners is the central core of education. By focusing on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence, educators impart meaning to a small group of students. This is valuable for the small group, but many other learners are excluded. These learners may not grasp the content well and may fall behind in their studies. In the case of corporate education, learners will be unable to perform the tasks required of them, which results in poor performance and increases the likelihood being released from their position. Not using the theory of Multiple Intelligences alienates a large number of learners.
  • 4. Solution As John Medina points out in his book Brain Rules, “…the more meaning something has, the more memorable it becomes (2009, pp. 111). To increase the memorable qualities of content, instructional designers and educators must expand their horizons and concentrate on methods that will help them reach a larger number of learners (Slides 6, 23-24, 41-57, 75-80, 84). Using the theory of Multiple Intelligences to find alternative methods to approaching traditional educational situations helps instructional designers and educators fulfill this goal. Ultimately, they need to find what motivates learners so they want to learn (Slide 4). Evidence To help my audience design, create, and deliver content that appeals to a variety of intelligences as outlined by Howard Gardner, I must define multiple intelligences. I accomplish this on slides 6, 37, 39, 58. I adapted this information from Gardner’s Frames of Mind. To help my audience appeal to multiple intelligences as defined by Howard Gardner, I must present the benefits of doing so; I must motivate them. My best examples of this are on slides 77- 84 where my choice of words is meant to impart a sense of immediacy, energy, and desire. Examples include: • “…live life well.” Slide 77 • “…learn well.” Slide 78 • “…more opportunities.” Slide 79 • “…make a topic intriguing.” Slide 80 I provide concise anecdotes to provide ideas and spark new ideas (Slides 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, and 57). I adapted this information from Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. These achieve the following goals: • To help my audience better serve their students • To help them appeal to more diverse audiences • To help them keep learners of varying strengths engaged Anecdotes I used interesting stories about both Derek Paravicini and Alonzo Clemons to illustrate that some individuals show explicit evidence of lacking intelligence in some areas, but showing extreme talent and intelligence in other areas. This provides evidence that there is not an overall intelligence as Gardner’s indicates, but multiple intelligences that we each possess to varying degrees. This served as a way to reform my evidence and involve my audience (Abela, 2008, pp. 65). These anecdotes exemplify the “rebirth” story plot as identified by Abela (2008, pp. 70) and is the most impacting of all the anecdotes I use. I also used short fictional anecdotes for an example showing how to implement each type of intelligence.
  • 5. Sequencing I found that the S.Co.R.E. method (Abela, 2008, pp. 75-87) lent itself to my topic well and strengthened organizational structure. I begin with a question that is relevant to my audience, “How can I make learners learn?” on slide 2 of my presentation. This outlines the situation aspect of the S.Co.R.E. method. I state the over-arching solution on slide 4, “It’s about finding what motivates [learners] so they want to learn.” This is intended to help audience personality types that want an overview up-front (Abela, 2008, pp.21). Slide 25 describes the main complication, “Our culture focuses most of its attention on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence.” This is the central complication of the entire presentation (Abela, 2008, pp. 75). I made the design decision to outline this concept only once as to avoid unnecessary repetition and to help audience personality types that want an overview up-front (Abela, 2008, pp.21). Each resolution and example ties directly into this complication. On slides 6 and 17, I present a diagram outlining an overview of Howard Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences. I chose a “radiate” type of diagram with a core to help explain how parts of a whole interact with one another (Duarte, 2008, pp. 44). The core represents the central element of the multiple intelligences. The outer elements connect with it to represent a parent-child relationship (Duarte, 2008, pp. 52). Graphics Decision #1 – Unity Each image in the presentation is relevant and supports and illustrates the content and concept (Abela, 2008, pp. 97). I’ve avoided all visual distractions and decorations. When selecting my images, I took care to ensure they all hold a common thread and look like a cohesive family unit when compared to one another (Duarte, 2008, pp. 160). Each is a photograph of similar quality as most are from the same source. I also repeat a few images to create a sense of unity between messages presented far apart from one another (slides 4 and 71). Decision #2 – Placement of objects on slide I placed objects on the slide (graphics and text) to create an ease of movement for the eye. It matches the natural flow of our eye so the audience knows in which order to process the information (Duarte, 2008, pp. 92). An example is slide 63; my audience will naturally view the image before reading the text on the slide. The image is important on this slide because it reinforces the message and represents a typical test currently used in our educational system. I placed each object to help guide a viewer’s eye across the slide; this helps roadmap their experience (Abela, 2008, pp. 134). For example, the images on slides 2-4 are on the right side of each slide. When I switch to a new idea on slide 5, I place the image on the left side. This is an unspoken signal to the audience that something has changed. I chose the left because we typically read left to right, so it also signifies a new start.
  • 6. Decision #3 – Reinforce the main message of each slide I chose a stark white background to juxtapose the large vivid pictures and provide the audience with visual breathing room (Duarte, 2008, pp. 106). This contrast helps give the images more impact and places them at center stage so the audience can identify the main points quickly (Duarte, 2008, pp. 94). I also chose the large sizes of images to both represent the ballroom style of presentation, and to ensure that my page layout reinforces the main message of the slide (Abela, 2008, pp. 108). For example, when I introduce Howard Gardner, the main focal point of the slide is his image. There is a small sentence above his image explaining its context (slide 16). Text Decision #1 – Conversational tone After considering the type of relationship I want my presentation to have with my audience (Duarte, 2008, pp. 14) I decided I want my audience to interact with my presentation as if they were interacting with a friend: in a conversation. It helps me involve people in my presentation (Abela, 2008, pp. 64). For example, I ask the audience questions (Slides 5, 7, 8, 9, 40, 59, etc.). Decision #2 – Minimal text I used text minimally except when using anecdotes (Abela, 2008, pp. 112). I used this technique to produce a visually rich and professional presentation. As Duarte points out presentations are a “glance media.” Therefore I used minimal text to help impart my message in approximately 3 seconds (Duarte, 2008, pp. 140). Slides 27-34 are my strongest examples. Decision #3 – Empowering language To communicate effectively and engage my audience’s emotions (Abela, 2008, pp. 63), I chose language that imparts a sense of empowerment and motivation. The sense of importance this language implies helps show how the content will make their lives better (Duarte, 2008, pp. 15). My best examples of this are on slides 77-84 where my choice of words is meant to impart a sense of immediacy, energy, and desire. Examples include: • “…live life well.” Slide 77 • “…learn well.” Slide 78 • “…more opportunities.” Slide 79 • “…make a topic intriguing.” Slide 80 Layout Decision #1 – Consistency I took into account placement and consistency issues into all decisions as I created slides that reinforce the main message of each slide (Abela, 2008, pp. 137). I chose large and impacting images (Slides 16, 25-33, 70, 76, 84) to remain in alignment with the Ballroom style presentation style as defined by Abela (2008, pp.112-113). Decision #2 – Simplicity of design Where relevant, each slide exemplifies contrast (Slides 1, 9, 22, 40-42), flow (Slides 51, 64, 69), hierarchy, unity, proximity (Slides 20, 65, 69-70, 73), and white space (Slides 37-42) as defined by Duarte (2008, pp. 92). Each slide also exemplifies simplicity of design and complexity of detail (Slides 3-5, 7-9, 20, 61-62) (Abela, 2008, pp. 138).
  • 7. Decision #3 – Visual flow I placed objects on the slide (graphics and text) to create an ease of movement for the eye (Slides 20, 65, 69-70, 73). It matches the natural flow of our eye so the audience knows in which order to process the information (Duarte, 2008, pp. 92). I paid special attention to the images of people to ensure they are always facing the slide/text (Duarte, 2008, pp. 97). My strongest examples are on slides 5, 27, 30, 54, 69, and 74. Measurement It would be possible to assess a curriculum developed by an educator, trainer, or instructional designer before they view this presentation and after. I could then compare the techniques used from both sets of data and see if the participants have increased use of techniques that appeal to a more diverse group of intelligences. Peer Review Results 1. What are three things I could do to make the “story” aspect of my presentation stronger? a. I think that your content breaks are designed well; they are already strong and tell descriptive and supportive stories. What I would suggest you do to make some of your slides stronger is play with text emphasis, proportion, boldness, size, etc. You've already done a great job; just some minor tweaks to layout will really help emphasize your points. b. I really enjoyed the anecdotes on the two gentlemen in the beginning. Einstein actually has a similar story from early in his school career - I think it was his middle school teacher that basically told him he was bad at school and would never amount to anything. He hated school so much that he quit! Maybe you could incorporate his story into the beginning, as well. I think that strengthening the "non-research-based" aspect of the multiple intelligences theory could actually strengthen the presentation if you elucidate Gardner's basis of his intuitions. Where did he get these ideas? You mention the quote from Gardner in the end - did studying his children motivate his development of this theory, similar to Piaget? Who's ideas did he build upon? Changes Made: • I added a number of slides that had text only to increase impact. I followed the advise of my first peer and played with the size, proportion, size, etc. – mostly with the text. • I liked the suggestions of adding Einstein’s story but did not add to it. Although he had trouble in school, he is not an example of a savant and does not reinforce my main message. I would categorize that type of information as “nice to know” rather than “need to know.” • I also liked the idea of finding out Gardner’s motivation behind creating his theory, but felt it was outside the scope of this presentation and chose to exclude it.
  • 8. 2. What aspects of the presentations seem weak? How would you improve them? Please list at least two. a. It's lacking in design of your text slides. They are simple (which is good) but look as though you didn't think about positioning, size, or layout. This might not be necessary, but could you give concrete examples of how you could teach math concepts to the musical learner (or maybe link to an internet site that gives more detailed information) b. The graphics from the novamind website are my least favorite aspects of the presentation. The graphics are outdated and the text is too small to be useful. I would suggest creating your own visualizations for those two slides. Enhancing the Einstein connection is another aspect that could be strengthened. It would enhance the story- telling aspect and help people see themselves in a genius (i.e. even Einstein had trouble in school!). Changes Made: • I reformatted almost every slide with careful thought to positioning, size, and layout. At this point in my development, I had not delved into that aspect. • I also like the second suggestion by Peer #1, but unfortunately felt that it was outside the scope of this presentation. • I removed the image that Peer #2 disliked. • I did not enhance the Einstein connection, because although he had trouble in school, he is not an example of a savant and does not reinforce my main message. I would categorize that type of information as “nice to know” rather than “need to know.” But I found it very interesting that both peers mentioned that. 3. What aspects of the presentations seem strong? How would you enhance them? Please list at least two. a. Your text breaks are strong. Your questions to the audience are appropriately positioned. I like the simplicity to each slide and idea. b. I liked the visuals of the types of learners. Later, you mention that teaching to all learners would enhance their engagement. This could be a great opportunity to show what using those teaching methods in the classroom could look like by including photos of those methods in action. Another possibility could be listing some examples of intelligence-specific teaching methods like "cooperative learning" under interpersonal and "time for reflection" under intrapersonal. Changes Made: • I agree that photos of those methods in action is a great idea. However, I do not have the opportunity to take my own photos in a classroom setting. This is something I would like to explore in future versions of this presentation. • I used Peer #2’s second suggestion and added a slide for each intelligence type explores what they need to help them learn.
  • 9. 4. I have implemented minimal design at this point (hopefully you can tell which slides I’ve worked on), but mostly I tossed pictures on there with loose placement. Based on the topic ideas would you suggest? Are my images relevant? a. I made suggestions before reading this question, so please disregard any comment to your minimal design, as I now realize it is because it is your draft. My suggestions for text formatting would be to integrate some color, size contrast, boldness and positioning that will focus on key words and help emphasize your point for each slide. I am not opposed to a white background, but a black background (or dark color) with white and colored text could be very striking. b. See my comments on images above. :-) Changes made: • I followed all the advice from Peer #1 and integrated color, size contrast, boldness and positioning that will focus on key words. 5. Since the text aspect of the draft is complete, do you walk away with a sense of understanding for the subject? If not, how can I make that “sticky?” a. Very sticky. This was inspiring! I loved viewing it!! b. I definitely understand the concept from your presentation; but have to admit that I had significant prior knowledge about the topic already. No changes needed
  • 10. Bibliography Abela, A. (2008). Advanced Presentations by Design: Creating Great Presentations. San Francisco: Pffeiffer. Armstrong, T. (1994). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple Intelligences. Retrieved February 20, 2010 from Dr. Thomas Armstrong: http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.htm. Brualdi, A. C. (1996). Multiple Intelligences: Gardner's Theory. Retrieved February 20, 2010 from Eric Digests: http://www.ericdigests.org/1998-1/multiple.htm. Duarte, N. (2008). Slide:ology: The Art and Science of Creating Great Presentations. Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media, Inc. Gardner, H. (1993). Frames of Mind. [Electronic version]. New York: Basic. Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. [Electronic version]. New York: Basic. Medina, J. (2009). Brain Rules. Pear Press. Smith, M. K. (2008). Howard Gardner, Multiple Intelligences and Education. Retrieved February 20, 2010 from The Encyclopedia of Informal Education: http://www.infed.org/thinkers/ gardner.htm. Smith, Mark K. (2002, 2008) 'Howard Gardner and multiple intelligences', the encyclopedia of informal education, http://www.infed.org/thinkers/gardner.htm. SUMIT Compass Points Practices. (2000). Retrieved February 20, 2010 from Project SUMIT: http://pzweb.harvard.edu/research/sumit.htm. Medina, J. (2009). Brain Rules. Pear Press.
  • 11. Appendix A Abela Worksheets Worksheet A.1a. Audience Personality Type Audience Personality Type Instructional Designers who are relatively new to the field Unknown / Varies Instructional Designers who are unfamiliar with Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences Unknown / Varies Worksheet A.1b. Audience Personality Implications Instructional Presentation Implications • Provide all or part of the presentation in advance • Plan for lots of discussion and Q&A • Include all relevant facts and details in the presentation or appendix • Provide an overview up-front • Identify principles, costs, and benefits • State implication for the audience • Present Conclusions up-front • List all alternatives considered The field of instructional design attracts a variety of personality types. Many instructional designers were once trainers, technicians, engineers, writers, project managers, and more. These roles enable them to bring valuable experience and knowledge to the field, and also make statements about possible personality types. Whereas a trainer may be an extrovert, a writer is likely to be an introvert. Because instructional design attracts a wide range of personality types, all audience personality implications must be taken into account.
  • 12. Worksheet A.2. From-To Think-Do Matrix From To Think Providing instruction to visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners ensures all learners’ will remain engaged and all possible learning needs are met Appealing to the seven intelligences as defined by Howard Gardner will better serve students, appeal to larger audiences, and is more likely to keep learners engaged Do Strictly adhere to templates regardless of content or subject matter Design and create creative training materials that appeal to a variety (more than 4) of Gardner’s multiple intelligences Do Create training material with little to no interaction that largely appeals to auditory learners through the use of lecture Design and create creative training materials that appeal to a variety (more than 4) of Gardner’s multiple intelligences
  • 13. Worksheet A.3. Audience Problem Many business environments minimize the skills and knowledge instructional designers must have to succeed in their profession. Oftentimes employers do not have formal training in instructional design, nor do they have professional experience in the field. They also may not look for these qualities when hiring instructional designers. When an employer lacks the skills or knowledge they need to lead their staff, new designers may not receive the direction or professional development they need to perform their jobs successfully. Employees in turn struggle to complete tasks and fear that they are performing poorly. Their confidence and job satisfaction decrease. Their fear manifests itself in stress and anxiety, which can affect health, emotions, interpersonal relationships, and more. If these detrimental consequences continue for significant durations, employees are likely to either loose motivation to perform well, or separate from their job. Worksheet A.4. Spectrum of Solution Contributions This presentation will provide a foundation and framework for guiding new instructional designers. It will focus their attention to their audience, which will give them direction and a goal to accomplish. Although this only solves part of the problem, it will assist in providing direction to new instructional designers and provide a foundation for future development.
  • 14. Worksheet A.5. Solution Evaluation Evaluation Criteria Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Appeal to Gardner’s multiple intelligences Appeal to VARK (visual, auditory kinesthetic, and read/write) Appeal to auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles Evaluate Courses Participants Create By appealing to more learning styles, we’re able to engage more participants. This engagement will increase retention and therefore test scores. This option appeals to up to 7 learning styles. This option appeals to 4 learning styles. This option appeals to 3 learning styles. Analyze Training Material The training material should include techniques that appeal to more than 4 learning styles. The training material should include techniques that appeal to 4 learning styles. The training material should include techniques that appeal to 3 learning styles. Quality Assurance Scores As levels of retention increase, so do quality assurance scores. This option promises to be 3 times more effective than Option 2, and 4 times more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be only slightly more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be 3 times less effective than Option 2, and 4 times less effective than Option 3. Customer Service Complaints As levels of retention increase, customer service complaints decrease. This option promises to be 3 times more effective than Option 2, and 4 times more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be only slightly more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be 3 times less effective than Option 2, and 4 times less effective than Option 3. Employee Retention As levels of retention increase, so does job satisfaction and employee retention. This option promises to be 3 times more effective than Option 2, and 4 times more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be only slightly more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be 3 times less effective than Option 2, and 4 times less effective than Option 3. Customer Retention As levels of retention increase, so does customer service and retention. This option promises to be 3 times more effective than Option 2, and 4 times more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be only slightly more effective than Option 3. This option promises to be 3 times less effective than Option 2, and 4 times less effective than Option 3. Revenue The compilation of these evaluation criteria results in increased revenue.
  • 15. Worksheet A.6. List of Evidence • Gardner’s Theory Multiple Intelligences o http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences o http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.htm o Armstrong, Thomas. 7 Kinds of Smart: Identifying and Developing Your Many Intelligences, New York: Plume, 1993. o Gardner, Howard. Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences. New York: Basic,1983. o http://www.businessballs.com/howardgardnermultipleintelligences.htm • Case Studies o Gardner, Howard. Multiple Intelligences: The Theory in Practice. New York: Basic, 1993. o Gardner, Howard. Responsibility at Work. New York: Jossey-Bass, 2007. o http://escholarship.bc.edu/dissertations/AAI3103223/ o http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Theory_of_multiple_intelligences http://www.sonustech.com/paravicini/index.html http://artsales.com/ARTists/Alonzo_Clemons/Prodigious_Savant_Syndr ome.htm • Classroom examples that use Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences successfully o http://www.context.org/ICLIB/IC27/Campbell.htm o http://www.edutopia.org/multiple-intelligences-immersion-enota-how-to o Armstrong, Thomas. Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 1994. • Commentary from Instructional Design Scholars o Schaler, Jeffrey A. Ph.D. Howard Gardner Under Fire. New York: Open Court, 2006. o http://www.scribd.com/doc/10055903/Theory-of-Multiple-Intelligences
  • 16. Worksheet A.7 Stakeholder Analysis Who will be impacted by the success or failure of this instructional product? Group A Instructional Designers (My Audience) Group B Trainers Group C Participants (My Audience’s Audience) What is their role in the success or failure of this instructional product? Implement Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences in training material Deliver the training material created by Group A Receive training material from Group B How will they be impacted if the instructional product is a success (i.e., learners achieve learning objectives)? The following will increase: • Performance • Job satisfaction • Self confidence Their roles will be easier because they will be supported by stronger training material Their training experience will be more interesting and engaging. They will retain more information which makes their interactions with customers smooth and easy How will they be impacted if the instructional product is a failure (i.e., learners do not achieve learning objectives)? They will remain in a state of fear, uncertainty, and job dissatisfaction No change (no improvement) They will not be fully engaged in the training, they will be bored and retain less information. With less knowledge, their interactions with customers will be more difficult

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