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Oer11 starsand fastcars_symposium
 

Oer11 starsand fastcars_symposium

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This is the set of presentations given at OER11, May 2011, Manchester Conference Centre in a symposium entitled 'Stars and Fast Cars: walking the red carpet of good practice'

This is the set of presentations given at OER11, May 2011, Manchester Conference Centre in a symposium entitled 'Stars and Fast Cars: walking the red carpet of good practice'

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  • Lindsay Wood, Project Officer HEFCE, JISC and HEA
  • These are only a few of the many recommendations, but they are the ones which we want to highlight to you . We really need institutions to use CC licences on their works, to clarify exactly who owns what and how it may be used. Institutions frightened of giving away the ‘crown jewels’ may be perfectly happy with releasing up to 75% of a module or programme (which may still be useful to others). To protect ourselves and our colleagues into the future we need sophisticated searching (reputation based materials) and take down policies. We would like to know that staff can be rewarded for getting involved in this, as contributors and users of other people’s resources. We also had many recommendations for JorumOpen (the national repository) who we were working with to implement as many as we can.
  • Authentication, data security, interoperability, quality assurance
  • What are the barriers to OER adoption What are the solutions - now and in the future how might we customise and promote these processes
  • On the website you can find reports, the toolkit – version 3 will be significantly better in terms of the single interface, and available in November 2010. You can find information about OER2, PORSCHE and ACTOR projects, and find an increasing number of case studies – about 10 so far, though we have done about 60. Do get in touch with us and follow us on Twitter…..
  • We all know the benefits of OER, how sharing is good for economic reasons, transparency, legal reasons, accessibility… What we wanted to do within *this* project, is to get the message out there to the community…
  • Wenger defines communities of practice as such. Building on the use and re-use of OERs we are concentrating on creating a community of practice which will extend beyond the original partners.
  • So – who are these people? Well. Some of these courses are acredited against the UKPSF - The UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) for teaching and supporting learning, a framework which uses a descriptor-based approach to professional standards. It aligns them to descriptors such as professional activity, core knowledge and professional values. If anyone would like any information about the While they are in competition for students, each PGCertClinEd is run by a small number of dedicated staff committed to diversifying their provision, and there are tens of thousands of potential applicants as NHS leaders required educational supervisors to be ‘trained’.
  • So – what will they do? Well, looking through the material they already have available, they can identify resources that can be made OPEN – and they’ll do this using the MEDEV toolkit. (as the PORSCHE project explained, this risk assessment toolkit looks at copyright clearance, patient consent, accessibility and quality assurance – it then allows you to print a record of each resource you’ve taken through this process – for audit purposes). They are investigating current institutional policy (where it exists) around opening up educational resources. This way we can document the processes necessary to enable learning resources from the sector to be made ‘open’ .
  • Policies and practice: This way we can document the processes necessary to enable learning resources from the sector to be made ‘open’ . How do the policies their institutions have in place relate to IPR and consent?
  • Applying CC licences What happens if they move to a new institution and inherit a previous course director’s materials. Can they use it? If an academic gets another job in a different institution – can they take their old material (that they designed) with them? These are all issues we are addressing with the ACTOR community Up to 30 credits worth of clinical education materials into Jorum to share.
  • Clinical diaries can be a nightmare for one-2-one meetings, let alone a meeting for all partners (and others) to attend. The project is due to finish (officially) on 31 st August 2011. Thereafter…well, it’ s a matter of sustainability
  • Motivation so far has been good. Obviously this is a small project and therefore a small amount of funding just covers expenses. With this in mind we considered the following Face-to-face meetings to begin with. Each site visit to partners consisted of a meeting (approx. half a day) to go through the project plans and discuss potential issues or threats to competition of the project. Then a more blended approach was necessary. The use of web 2.0 and social networking tools have been used a lot within this project. Most communication has been online in some format or other. For example….
  • PM s/w – basecamp. Proves useful for most of our MEDEV projects. Used as a central repository for and messages/notes/emails/files relating to the problem. Everyone has a login for it and is advised when any new relevant information appears. We purchased a copy of Elluminate for workshops with run within MEDEV. This has proved extremely useful for hosting online Exec Group/Partner meetings. Elluminate allows video conferencing, participation on screen whiteboards, voting/poll systems. No travel – meeting for up to 90 mins at desk – in this economic climate is a bonus. It also allows webcasting so we can demonstrate resources/toolkits and any new technologies. Skype: Face to face video or audio conference can be invaluable for a quick meeting – say 5mins – to report on any progress to date or to get together to decide on one issue, rather than 20 emails going back and forth. Blogs: MEDEV has an oer-phase-2-blog which takes feeds from individual staff blogs which are tagged with ‘oer-phase-2’ and the PORSCHE and ACTOR blogs. These combine into one big feed which can be syndicate and commented on. If you wish to view ACTOR separately – the URL is shown here.
  • Using Google ’ s advanced search helps them find openly licenced images Same with Flickr – using the advanced search Xpert is a search tool created at Nottingham university which allows you to search for openly licenced material (images, videos, etc.) which also searches Flickr. It then shows you an easy way to attribute resources and embed them into teaching materials. Xerte has online and desktop tools which allow creation of learning objects that can then be uploaded to blackboard or another VLE GLOmaker is similar in that it has tools to help you create ‘ shareable ’ content.
  • Nominal funding means that the partners engage voluntarily so there are challenges to the virtual community [For the money we had we could ’ ve paid one person to create all of these materials – but would they be as good?] A site visit to one partner for 90 mins has proved more valuable than anything else they ’ ve done in the last year.
  • Our 5 main partners are on board – not only are they disseminating inforamtion about the ACTOR community at conferences much like this – but they are disseminating within their own institutions and this is havinga significant effect on their superiors, their colleagues and their students. Here ’ s a couple of example of the kind of resources….
  • Example OER resource (video) with example attribution – owner and source clearly identified. ‘ Aspects of Anatomy ’ (very West End title!) A professor of anatomy demonstrates various aspects with plastinated specimens
  • Another example from the RVC – an extremely well-behaved virtual dog. you can shine lights / out a finger in front of the eye / or poke it with a cotton bud to judge the reaction and make a diagnosis
  • This is the purpose of the ACTOR project.
  • Slides used at CETL4HealthNE workshop on Tuesday 29 March at Durham Conference Centre, and again at QUILT workshop on Friday 15 April 2011.
  • JW Then SH Here is the problem. OERs move across clinical and academic settings. The same person might be making and delivering materials. They may be, or the recordings used within them are collected by clinicians under rigorous guidance both at a national (GMC) level and a local trust of health authority level. When these materials are then delivered in an educational event in an academic setting things can go awry. This slide illustrates one of the things that is special to our project and other healthcare projects: Where we have clinicians who are paid by the NHS, who create materials in clinical settings, but deliver them in academic settings under an honorary contract with the university but who are not paid by that university Where then does risk and responsibility lie? Enlarging on this a bit further, what we have on the left is a very clear process for taking cosent for using recordings within a clinical setting for treatment, research and ‘ local ’ education. On the right however, we then wish to re-use images and incorporate them into VLEs, share materials, etc. But no evidence of consent, we don ’ t have access to the patient record. And so the location of risk is unclear. What we do know is that both the clinical organisation and the academic organisation both want to do what is right. It is not clear where the responsibilities of the clinical setting end – what happens once images left their patch? On the other side, universities are beginning to be aware of their responsibilities but have no mechanisms to handle them But all want to do the right thing. Mobilty of image around the world and the fact that resources are being shared whether they were intended to be shared or not Universties are not aware of their responsibilities in this setting Doctors want to do it properly Universities want to do it properly No mechanism is currently in place to support them doing that
  • JW The OOER project recommended just getting consent – and then we are clear. SH We feel this is something we should all be doing anyway – in the same way we collect and store consent for treatment and research. And in the same way as we reference in publications. It should be as easy and as embedded in practice as that. Its about good practice which is easy and practical to implement. It ’s about covering our backs and trying to think further down the line – making the consent status clear for other users who may use this recording in a different way. What a consent license could do is make the patients rights clear alongside the owner ’s rights.
  • Need to ba able to hallmark or give provenance to the fact that consent exists under what conditions the recording can be used.
  • In our field – healthcare education there is a third thing we should be thinking about. If there are people in our resources, if they contain any recordings – video, audio, photographs – we need to additionally think about consent. I am not going to focus on this today, but it is useful to know that there are another couple of pieces of work going on around consent and making this explicit too – email me if you want more details on this, or I can come back another time to talk to you specifically about that. I was at a meeting yesterday which is bringing together experts to put together a set of principles and a code of practice around consent, and in our OER2 project, PORSCHE, we are working with CC UK and others to put together some ideas around a Consent Commons to complement Creative Commons – making consent in resources.
  • While copyright is an automatic right, data protection is better described as a set of principles. Arising from the perspective of patient consent (patient data is classed as ‘sensitive’ under the DPAct1998) for patient materials used in teaching, we argue for additional tools to support consent from people. When creating open educational resources copyright doesn’t quite go far enough to recognise the rights of people who are represented to be respected (whether they have copyright or not). Representation could be a photograph, voice or video recording, data set or patient story. For example, if a person has agreed for their photograph to appear in your open educational resources (they are a student, a member of staff, an actor, etc.), and they pass away, what do you do if their family asks you to take down the OER? (What you are legally required to do may be different to what you would choose to do, in principle). Therefore you are essentially operating ‘policies’.
  • A human consent version of a Creative Commons licence would enable much more sophisticated recognition of the role and rights of people (whether they are the ‘creators’ or not) to be treated fairly and with respect. We need new technologies to support the implementation of Consent Commons – such as the ability to inform users that a resource has been updated or ‘taken down’.
  • SH We would like to propose a consent commons to work alongside or with creative commons as a way of demonstrating due diligence in dealing with issues of consent and using patient data sensitively in learning and teaching with specific reference to being able to share.
  • Clinical research data has a sell buy date after which it must be disposed of Do the same principles apply to learning and teaching?
  • On the website you can find reports, the toolkit – version 3 will be significantly better in terms of the single interface, and available in November 2010. You can find information about OER2, PORSCHE and ACTOR projects, and find an increasing number of case studies – about 10 so far, though we have done about 60. Do get in touch with us and follow us on Twitter…..
  • Thanks for listening….. NOTES Chair of TEL strategy development group at DH is Dr Stuart Charney – elearning simulation and other tel systems. National eLearning Portal Kate Lomax: www.elearning.nhs.uk Forthcoming workshops on copyright and elearning – nb contact kate and see if collaboration useful Is the search on the readiness toolkit available to build services on top of? E.g does it have RSS? Elearning developers network – consent commons? CoP. Resources loads of useful stuff there. NLMS Jo Sidebottom
  • Slides used at CETL4HealthNE workshop on Tuesday 29 March at Durham Conference Centre, and again at QUILT workshop on Friday 15 April 2011.
  • Just as we expect students and junior staff to model professional behaviours in real life, we need them to do the same in the digital environment.
  • Thanks for listening….. NOTES Chair of TEL strategy development group at DH is Dr Stuart Charney – elearning simulation and other tel systems. National eLearning Portal Kate Lomax: www.elearning.nhs.uk Forthcoming workshops on copyright and elearning – nb contact kate and see if collaboration useful Is the search on the readiness toolkit available to build services on top of? E.g does it have RSS? Elearning developers network – consent commons? CoP. Resources loads of useful stuff there. NLMS Jo Sidebottom

Oer11 starsand fastcars_symposium Oer11 starsand fastcars_symposium Presentation Transcript

  • Stars in fast cars: walking the red carpet of good practice with OERs in health and social care education Dr Megan Quentin-Baxter Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Medicine Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine [email_address] #ukoer #porsche #actor #medev www.medev.ac.uk/oer/ cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/ ©2005 indieridley.i.ph/blogs/indieridley/page/5/
  • UK policy context
    • HEFCE JISC/Academy OER programme
    • Projects in health and social care
    • Health and social care educational context
    • Educational context
    • Recommendations
    • Attribution and disclaimer
  • UK HEFCE JISC/Academy OER programme
    • Organising Open Educational Resources ( OOER)
    • [PHORUS – HSaP]
    • Phase 1 OER project
    • 250K - Apr 2009-Mar 2010
    • Investigated institutional practice, developed toolkits, disseminated widely
    • 15 UK partners
    • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/
    • PORSCHE & ACTOR
    • [SWAPBox – SWAP]
    • Phase 2 OER projects
    • £125K & £20K respectively
    • Linking NHS and academic networks
    • Disseminating through ‘clinical education’ programmes (training the trainers)
  • Educational context
    • Health and social care education
      • Professional programmes leading to registration with the professional bodies
      • Education is a shared responsibility between academia and the health/social care sectors (NHS)
      • Education takes place in practice
      • Responsibility educating the educators (PG Certificate in Clinical Education)
      • Teachers employed by different organisations
  • OOER institutional policy recommendations
    • That authors should ‘hallmark’ all their content with CC licences e.g. CC ‘ by ’ (attribution only)
    • Consent everything-even where ownership and patient/non-patient rights appear clear, and store consent with resource
    • Review institutional policies against good practice
    • Include attribution and disclaimers in resources, and use resources from elsewhere professionally
    • UK HE enters a dialogue with publishers to increase the potential for re-using upstream copyrights
    • Have sophisticated ‘take-down’policies
    www.medev.ac.uk
  • OER11 Symposium
    • PORSCHE – NHS context and sharing across sectors
    • ACTOR – disseminating good practice through UK Clinical Education programmes
    • Consent Commons – emerging need for tools and principles to support people appearing in clinical recordings in OER
    • Digital professionalism – mainstreaming professional attitudes and behaviours in UK UG curricula
  • Attribution and disclaimer
    • This file is made available under a Creative Commons attribution share alike licence
    • To attribute author/s please include the phrase “cc: by-sa Megan Quentin-Baxter, May 2011, http://www.ucel.ac.uk/oer11/ ”
    • Users are free to link to, reuse and remix this material under the terms of the licence which stipulates that any derivatives must bear the same terms. Anyone with any concerns about the way in which any material appearing here has been linked to, used or remixed from elsewhere, please contact the author who will make reasonable endeavour to take down the original files within 10 working days.
    www.medev.ac.uk
  • Pathways for Open Resource Sharing through Convergence in Healthcare Education (PORSCHE) Kate Lomax eLearning Repository, The London Deanery Lindsay Wood Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Medicine Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine, Newcastle University
    • Sharing resources and best practice across the NHS/HE divide
    contact: lindsay@medev.ac.uk www.medev.ac.uk/ourwork/oer/ #porscheoer #ukoer #medev cc: by Tony the Misfit http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonythemisfit/2580913560/
  • eLearning in the NHS
    • established, albeit limited use
    • access is complex - many different systems, security, ownership
    • local and national content, local and national infrastructure
    2
  • NHS infrastructure now and in the future
  • Lightweight technical solutions
  • Good practice in a complex world Sharing resources and best practice across HE/NHS divide
    • identify and overcome barriers to OER creation and use
    • promote sustainable best practices in a changing NHS
    • document issues and raise awareness of mutually useful resources and tools
    Some rights reserved by te.esce PORSCHE : Working in partnership to:
  • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/register/
  • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/register/
  • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/ [email_address] [email_address] twitter.com/hea_medev www.medev.ac.uk/blog/oer-phase-2-blog/ www.elearningrepository.nhs.uk/ [email_address] [email_address] twitter.com/nhselearning
  • OER11, Manchester 11 th May 2011 (Gillian Brown, Education Advisor) Accredited Clinical Teaching Open Resources (ACTOR) Contact: gillian@medev.ac.uk #ukoer #actor #medev www.medev.ac.uk/oer/ cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • Accredited Clinical Teaching Open Resources (ACTOR) Partners: University of Bristol University of Cambridge Hull York Medical School Newcastle University Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry Contact: gillian@medev.ac.uk #ukoer #actor #medev www.medev.ac.uk/oer/ cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • Sharing openly is good!
    • Use of public funds/money, cost savings, collaboration
    • Transparency and accountability
    • Legally defensible
    • Advantages for student recruitment, learning, satisfaction and retention
    • Equality of access, helping the developing world
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • The ACTOR Community of Practice "...groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly." (Wenger, 2000) cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
    • WHO is the community?
    • PG Cert Clin Ed Leads/Tutors
            • (accredited/ or not)
    • Their students
    • Clinicians in NHS settings
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
    • WHAT will they will do?
    • Identify and categorise potential resources
    • Document compliance with MEDEV toolkit
    • Analyse policies and document practice
    • Align resources to the UK Professional Standards Framework
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • WHY will they do it?
    • To analyse policies and practice
    • To share and gain access to resources
    • To reduce development work when creating resources from scratch
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • WHAT’s in it for them?
    • Enhancement of quality in learning and teaching resources
    • Institutional collaboration
    • Advantages for marketing and student retention
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • WHAT’s in it for them?
    • Learn how to licence materials
    • Knowing where they stand in regard to their own resources
    • >30 credits
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • WHEN will they do it?
    • Clinical diaries can be an issue
    • During the remaining months of the project
    • … and thereafter?
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • HOW do we sustain a sense of ‘community’ for people who only meet online?
    • F2F in beginning and wherever possible
    • Employ web 2.0 technologies/social networking for communication
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • Web 2.0 technologies and social networking
    • Tools we’ve used so far:
    • Project management software
    • Video conferencing (Elluminate / Adobe Connect)
    • Skype
    • Blogs: http ://www.medev.ac.uk/blog/oer-phase-2- blog , http ://www.medev.ac.uk/blog/actor /
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • What OER tools will facilitate production and sharing of resources?
    • Google
    • Flickr
    • Xpert
    • Xerte
    • GLOmaker
    • Etc…
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • You don ’ t know what you don ’ t know … especially when there is no time or resource to find out! cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • So far…
    • We’re getting there!
    • Slow start – timing of site visits
    • Seeing the benefit of sharing resources within just one institution!
    • Cascade effect
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/ University of Warwick Anatomy collection as part of their iTunes U presence deimos3.apple.com/WebObjects/Core.woa/Browse/warwick.ac.uk.1885881473.01885881478.1882421734?i=2066269580
  • cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/ Royal Veterinary College ‘ ocular reflexes ’ interactive activity as part of their submission to the Jorum repository http://resources.jorum.ac.uk/xmlui/handle/123456789/14457
  • Summary
    • Creating a national community while facing a lack of time/resource (clinical diaries)
    • Drawing on the potential that current web 2.0 and social networking technologies can offer
    • A network/community centred around their professional activity – that they feel they’ve contributed to
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • You don ’ t know what you don ’ t know … especially when there is no time or resource to find out! cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • Questions … ? cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • References
    • Adobe Connect (2011) Web Conferencing | Adobe Connect , http://www.adobe.com/products/ adobeconnect.html
    • Elluminate (2011) eLearning & Collaboration Solutions :: Elluminate , http:// www.elluminate.com
    • UKPSF (2006) United Kingdom Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) – The Higher Education Academy , http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/ourwork/universitiesandcolleges/accreditation/ukpsf
    • Wenger, E. (2000) ‘ Communities of practice and learning systems ’ , Organization , Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.225–246.
    cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/
  • cc: by-nc By Maxi Walton http://www.flickr.com/photos/maxiwalton/898138774/ This file is made available under a Creative Commons attribution share alike licence . To attribute author/s please include the phrase “cc: by-sa Gillian Brown, May 2011” Users are free to link to, reuse and remix this material under the terms of the licence which stipulates that any derivatives must bear the same terms. Anyone with any concerns about the way in which any material appearing here has been linked to, used or remixed from elsewhere, please contact the author who will make reasonable endeavour to take down the original files within 10 working days.
  • Consent Commons: a proposed model for recognising the rights of people to refuse of withdraw from participation in open educational resources Suzanne Hardy Senior Advisor Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Medicine
  • Clinical setting Academic setting
    • Doctor collects consent
    • Recordings taken
    • Consent for recordings stored with patient record
    • Clear guidance available
    • Recordings incorporated into educational event
    • Uploaded to VLE
    • No evidence of consent
    • No access to patient record
    • Location of risk unclear
    We all want to do the right thing!
  • Consent everything-even where ownership and patient/non-patient rights appear clear, and store consent with resource
  •  
  •  
  • Consent as distinct from IPR
    • Defined by the principles in the Data Protection Act 1998 and Human Rights Act 1998
    • Recognises the need for more sophisticated management of consent for recordings of people (stills, videos, audios, etc.)
      • Teachers (academics, clinicians, practice/work based learning tutors, etc.)
      • Students and ‘ product placement ’ (branded items)
      • Role players/actors/performers/hired help (including recording crew)
      • Patients/patient families/care workers/support staff/members of public in healthcare settings ( sensitive personal data)
      • GMC review of the guidelines for consent/patient recordings
    www.medev.ac.uk
  • Consent as distinct from IPR
    • Proposing a “Consent Commons”
      • A human subject version of Creative Commons
      • Accepts a basic human right to refuse their image/voice appearing and, where they have previously consented, their right to withdraw their consent
      • Would work like Creative Commons in that you hallmark material with the consent status and when consent needs to be reviewed (if ever)
      • Has levels of release (e.g. Closed; ‘medic restrict’; review [date]; fully open)
      • Terms of the consent needs to be stored with/near the resource
    www.medev.ac.uk
  • consent commons Consent Commons ameliorates uncertainty about the status of educational resources depicting people, and protects institutions from legal risk by developing robust and sophisticated policies and promoting best practice in managing information.
  •  
  •  
  • Principles
    • 1. Acknowledge that patients’ interests and rights are paramount.
    • 2. Respect the rights to privacy and dignity of other people who are included in recordings, such as family members and health care workers.
    • 3. Respect the rights of those who own the recordings and the intellectual property of those recordings, and check and comply with the licences for use.
    • 4. Take professional responsibility for your making and use of recordings and alert colleagues to their legal and ethical responsibilities where appropriate.
  • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/register/
  •  
  • www.medev.ac.uk/oer/ [email_address] twitter.com/hea_medev www.medev.ac.uk/blog/oer-phase-2-blog/
  •  
  • Attribution and disclaimer
    • This ppt file is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike version 3.0 unported licence .
    • Please include the following phrase ‘Suzanne Hardy, OER11, 11 May 2011 http://www.ucel.ac.uk/oer11’
  • Moving towards a culture of digital professionalism to encourage involvement in open educational resources Helen Blanchett JISC Netskills Newcastle University
  • Digital professionalism
    • To be a digital professional every member of staff who contributes to curriculum delivery, in both NHS and academic settings should be able to identify, model and understand professional behaviour in the digital environment.
    CC-BY Official US Navy Imagery www.flickr.com/photos/usnavy/5509486066/
  • Digital professionalism in the curriculum?
    • Digital professionalism: how we present and manage presence in the digital environment and how that presence relates to professionalism in the curriculum
    • Professionalism in Tomorrow’ s Doctors: www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/professional_behaviour.asp
    • No reference to professionalism online: implicit? explicit in your curriculum?
    • Information/resources increasingly easy to find
    • Blurring of personal and professional identities online
    • Increasing need to manage issues of disclosure
    • Changing public expectations
    • Misunderstandings of digital spaces
    • Consequence
    • Permanence
    • Lack of understanding of copyright and licencing in online environments
  • Towards a digital professionalism: 7 principles
    • Rachel Ellaway (2010)
    • Principle #1: establish and sustain an on online professional presence that befits your responsibilities while representing your interests. Be selective in which channels and places you establish a profile.
    • Principle #2: use privacy controls to manage more personal parts of your online profile and do not make public anything that you would not be comfortable defending as professionally appropriate in a court of law
    • Principle #3: think carefully and critically about how what you say or do will be perceived by others and act with appropriate restraint
    • Principle #4: think carefully & critically about how what you say or do reflects on others (individuals & organisations) and act with appropriate restraint
    • Principle #5: think carefully and critically about how what you say or do will be perceived in years to come; consider every action online as permanent
    By Michael Deschenes (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
    • Principle #6: be aware of the potential for attack or impersonation, know how to protect your online reputation and what steps to take when it is under threat
    Ellaway, 2010
    • Principle #7: an online community is still a community and you are still a professional
  • DO WE THE HAVE SKILLS & ABILITIES NEEDED?
    • BUT
  • Information literacy
    • “ Information literacy is knowing when and why you need information, where to find it, and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner”
    • Chartered Institute of Library & Information Professionals (CILIP)
  • Digital literacy
    • “ digital literacy defines those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society”
  • “ learners' information literacies are relatively weak but learners have little awareness of the problem ” (Beetham et al 2009)
  • “ many medical students seem unaware of or unconcerned with the possible ramifications of sharing personal information in publicly available online profiles even though such information could affect their professional lives ” (Ferdig et al, 2008)
  • “ most learners are still strongly led by tutors and course practices: tutor skills and confidence with technology are therefore critical to learners' development ” (Beetham et al, 2009)
  • How does this relate to oer?
    • And finally….
  • Manage risk by adopting good practice
    • Know how to find appropriately licenced content
    • Use the most openly licenced content wherever possible
    • Attribute 3 rd party material
    • Explicitly attribute your own work with disclaimer and licence as openly as possible
    • Pass on good practice to peers and students
  • Make hidden curricula explicit
    • Digital professionalism
    • Academic practice
    • Information & digital literacies
    • Who takes responsibility?
  •  
  • References
    • Beetham, H., L. McGill, et al. (2009). Thriving in the 21st century: Learning Literacies for the Digital Age. Glasgow, Glasgow Caledonian University/JISC. Online at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/projects/llidareportjune2009.pdf
    • Chretien, K. C., S. R. Greysen, et al. (2009). "Online Posting of Unprofessional Content by Medical Students." JAMA 302(12): pp1309-1315.
    • Ellaway, R. (2010). "eMedical Teacher # 38: Digital Professionalism." Medical Teacher 32(8): pp705–707.
    • Farnan, J. M., J. A. M. Paro, et al. (2009). "The Relationship Status of Digital Media and Professionalism: It ’ s Complicated " Academic Medicine 84(11): pp1479-1481.
    • Ferdig, R. E., K. Dawson, et al. (2008). "Medical students ’ and residents ’ use of online social networking tools: Implications for teaching professionalism in medical education." First Monday 13(9). Online at http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2161/2026
    • Thompson, L. A., K. Dawson, et al. (2008). "The Intersection of Online Social Networking with Medical Professionalism." J Gen Intern Med 23(7): p954-957.
    • Mostaghimi,A., Crotty, B.H., “ Professionalism in the digital age ” Annals of Internal Medicine 19 Apr 2011;154(8):560-562.
  • Attribution and disclaimer
    • This ppt file is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike version 3.0 unported licence .
    • Please include the following phrase ‘ Helen Blanchett, OER11, ’ www.ucel.ac.uk/oer11/abstracts/1166.html