NY EDEN as a Resource to Communities -helping them to be prepared for extremeweather eventsRod HoweCornell Cooperative Ext...
NY-EDEN: The BasicsEDEN is New York State’s premier programfocused upon linking extensioneducators, emergency managers, an...
www.EDEN.lsu.edu
National EDEN - History 1993 Midwest floods – lessons learned CSREES grant to Iowa, Illinois & Missouri North Central R...
NY-EDEN websitehttp://eden.cce.cornell.edu
Partnerships are KeyOur educational approach, for both preparation andrecovery, rely on the connection between research an...
Cornell Cooperative ExtensionAssociations as Partners• Trained staff• Communication skills & resources• Media connections•...
Extension Disaster Education and Climate Change:Cornell’s Nature and Human Security Applied Research andExtension Programf...
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CSCR Government #3: Preparing for Extreme Weather Events. Rod Howe, CARDI

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Climate Smart & Climate Ready Conference Government Track #3 on April 20, 2013 at Cinemapolis Theater in Ithaca, NY. Rod Howe, Community and REgional Development Institute, Cornell University. Climate Ready: Preparing for Extreme Weather Events.

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  • Rod can introduce and act as general host
  • We know that most communities will likely be impacted by several types of hazards during a lifetime. People are also traveling more than ever before to areas impacted by hazards they may not be at risk of near their homes. And the increasing frequency of hazards was mentioned previously. Knowing what to do before, during and after an emergency is a critical part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count. My applied extension work and research has shown repeatedly the difference preparedness makes in these contexts. Often, it is the difference between recovery and being written off, between a salvageable home or farm and a total loss, between life and death. People’s actions during and after extreme events directly affect outcomes across scales.So how do we ensure that peoples’ actions reflect the highest levels of preparedness, and manifest a culture of readiness and resilience? The answer is simply increased education and training, in all arenas (formal, informal, vocational, etc.). Before a disaster, people of all ages, incomes, and ethnicities need to learn how to know there is an impending hazardous event. They need to familiarize themselves with the signs of events that come without warning and know the local advance alerts and warnings and how they will receive them. Knowing about local emergency plans for shelter and evacuation and local emergency contacts will help them develop household plans and will also aid them during a crisis. Learning what to do in different situations and developing and customizing their plans for their local hazards, the locations frequented by members of their household and the specific needs of household members including animals will help them reduce the impact of disasters and may save lives and prevent injuries and property damage. People’s readiness and recovery capacity are a function of education and training. An the education and training we are talking about is available through NY EDEN. But before we get into that in further detail, I have a couple of questions for you--
  • The conception, development, and growth of the National Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN) were a direct result of the lessons learned by the land-grant system responding to the catastrophic Mississippi and Missouri river floods of 1993. The major lessons learned were:Long-term community recovery efforts would rest with three key groups/agencies - local government, the faith community and Extension. These three were in those communities long after the water receded andthe disaster was no longer national news.Citizens looked to Extension for resources and expertise related to disaster recovery, mitigation and preparedness, but the individual states lacked the capacity, research-based information or expertise toaddress the multitude of issues/needs resulting from a major disaster such as this.The emergency management community discovered that the Land-Grant system could be a tremendous asset.Extension had a role related to emergency management, but the faculty was not technically prepared to play that role.There was a need for more coordination and standardization of recovery recommendations by the various emergency response agencies - Departments of Health, Extension, Red Cross, Salvation Army, FEMA, etc.The impacted states lacked the capacity and resources to effectively deal with the magnitude of requests for information, expertise, recommendations, technical assistance, community planning, recovery issues, etc.Based on these lessons learned, it was obvious that the Land-Grant system would have an ongoing expectation to be involved locally and nationally in the emergency management arena.EDEN’s growth can especially be related to three events:When Extension staff from outside the North Central Region took part in the 1997 annual meeting in New Orleans in conjunction with the National Housing Conference, EDEN started becoming a national rather than regional network. By 2005, all 50 states and three territories had institutions as EDEN members.From July 2002 to June 2004, CSREES special needs funds provided grants to 17 member states to provide disaster education/emergency management training for their Extension educators.For a number of years NIFA (formerly CSREES) has provided EDEN with funding to support EDEN coordination and communications, Web development and maintenance, curriculum development, training, and resources development.
  • Here you can see a screen shot of the New York EDEN website. NY’s Extension Disaster Education program can be thought of as a “network within a network.” CCE NY EDEN is getting more and more “networked” with local, regional, and state institutions charged with disaster readiness, recovery, and resilience. And with offices in every county and the 5 boroughs of New York City, Cornell Cooperative Extension has the potential to provide to these institutions 56 portals across the state to NY EDEN and the larger national EDEN network. This where you come in of course. I’ll hand it back to Rod now to discuss Campus-county partnerships.
  • Rod set the stageThese partnerships provide us with a base to reach out to numerous partners: NYSDAM, SEMO, FEMA, etc.
  • Andy set the stage and then turn over to AnitaOkay. What is the context for copying equipment???Each county has an emergency plan for its office. Should include a piece on how will work with the County and FSA Should assign responsibilities and a back up person
  • CSCR Government #3: Preparing for Extreme Weather Events. Rod Howe, CARDI

    1. 1. NY EDEN as a Resource to Communities -helping them to be prepared for extremeweather eventsRod HoweCornell Cooperative Extension & NY-EDEN
    2. 2. NY-EDEN: The BasicsEDEN is New York State’s premier programfocused upon linking extensioneducators, emergency managers, andcommunity officials to enhance resilience andreduce the impact of disasters in New Yorkcommunities.
    3. 3. www.EDEN.lsu.edu
    4. 4. National EDEN - History 1993 Midwest floods – lessons learned CSREES grant to Iowa, Illinois & Missouri North Central Region committee 1997 – started becoming national 2002 CSREES training grant 2005 – all 50 states and three territoriesmembers
    5. 5. NY-EDEN websitehttp://eden.cce.cornell.edu
    6. 6. Partnerships are KeyOur educational approach, for both preparation andrecovery, rely on the connection between research andeffective outreach.CCE AssociationsCornell Colleges and DepartmentsMunicipalitiesLocal and Regional partnersState Agencies & OrganizationsBeneficiaries – families, businesses & communities
    7. 7. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionAssociations as Partners• Trained staff• Communication skills & resources• Media connections• Educational outreach• Community connections
    8. 8. Extension Disaster Education and Climate Change:Cornell’s Nature and Human Security Applied Research andExtension Programfacebook.com/CceEdendisaster@cornell.edueden.cce.cornell.eduState Program Leader – Keith TidballNY EDEN Adv. Council Chair – Rod HoweIsabelFrancesTammyIreneSandy… ?

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