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Southern SAWG - Producing Asian greens for market - Pam Dawling
 

Southern SAWG - Producing Asian greens for market - Pam Dawling

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Producing Asian Greens For Market — There are many varieties of tasty, nutritious greens that grow quickly and bring fast returns. Led by long-time producer and author of the new book, Sustainable ...

Producing Asian Greens For Market — There are many varieties of tasty, nutritious greens that grow quickly and bring fast returns. Led by long-time producer and author of the new book, Sustainable Market Farming, this session will cover production of Asian Greens outdoors and in the hoophouse, including tips on variety selection, timing of plantings, pest and disease management, fertility and weed management, and harvesting. Over twenty types of Asian Greens will be discussed. Pam Dawling, Twin Oaks Community (VA).

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  • We find that people are very ready for some fresh greens as the summer begins cooling down. Most of the crops I’m talking about Asian in origin, some developed in the US.
  • Less frilly than Tokyo Bekana
  • — I suppose enough salad dressing masks all flavors!
  • Golden Frills, etc. New varieties
  • Hon Tsai Tai, Brassica rapa, Mostly stem with small clusters of buds (which in our case, turned to flowers while we blinked). Mei Qing Choi, We don’t do well with miniature crops. I avoid varieties labeled “compact” in the catalogs.
  • Coming from the moist and verdant islands ofBritain,
  • Diseases are not much of a problem for us, though if they are for you, you may be justified infeeling grumpy with me after reading that!
  • This appears towards the end of the handout
  • For winter crops, there is no need to remove finished plants to the compost pile ifthey are not diseased. We simply leave them on the surface to dry up and disintegrate, improvingthe texture and nutrients in the surface layer of the soil. The higher temperatures and the lack ofrain ensure that crop residues will dry up rather than rot.
  • This is generally thought to be a health hazard (although recently this has beenquestioned). Boost CO2 by breathing.

Southern SAWG - Producing Asian greens for market - Pam Dawling Southern SAWG - Producing Asian greens for market - Pam Dawling Presentation Transcript