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Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
Army Sustainability
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Army Sustainability

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  • Briefer: Irene A. Cruz
  • Briefer: Installations will never have nor desire housing for all Soldier Families. This can result in long commutes or reduced quality of life for Soldiers and Families. Our traditional solution is to let the private sector address our needs – which is the American way – but can result in other problems moving forward – we developed installations in once remote locations specifically to avoid impacts on communities (Cows don’t really care if we blow stuff up). However, the economic drivers associated with operating a military base create incentives for people to develop residential communities around our installations. We want this – as long as development does not impact mission activities. However, without communication and partnership, we are likely to experience encroachment that will restrict or prohibit training --- we’ve already experienced this in many locations like Fort Bragg.
  • Briefer: S. So why is aggressive development a problem people have homes, right? But what about space to do training?We’ve probably all seen this before – this is an aerial photo of the St. Mere Eglise drop zone at Fort Bragg, NC. For safety reasons, certain types of training are no longer possible at this, one of three major drop zones at Fort Bragg. In this case, our traditional solution (let chips fall where they may approach) has resulted in decreased training capacity.
  • Briefer: So how does this translate to real examples - The traditional problem-solving approach is not necessarily bad or wrong but may lead to unintended consequences that require additional solutions or work arounds. The real issue arises when we keep fixing the same problem because we are unable to fix the cause of the problem. Or, we may be required to address an issue but responsibility for the issue really lies with another organization. For example – DPW energy directed to address energy consumption – costs are too high and growing. However, the cause of rising energy bills is directly linked to building design, technologies, and usage patterns by people at the installation. While the energy manager may be able to raise awareness and promote replacement of inefficient technologies, they really can’t do much about building designs and usage (especially where users are not held accountable for their consumption patterns (they don’t pay the bills)).
  • Briefer: So how does this translate to real examples - The traditional problem-solving approach is not necessarily bad or wrong but may lead to unintended consequences that require additional solutions or work arounds. The real issue arises when we keep fixing the same problem because we are unable to fix the cause of the problem. Or, we may be required to address an issue but responsibility for the issue really lies with another organization. For example – DPW energy directed to address energy consumption – costs are too high and growing. However, the cause of rising energy bills is directly linked to building design, technologies, and usage patterns by people at the installation. While the energy manager may be able to raise awareness and promote replacement of inefficient technologies, they really can’t do much about building designs and usage (especially where users are not held accountable for their consumption patterns (they don’t pay the bills)).
  • Briefer: The Army is a stove piped organization (like many businesses). While this organizational structure can lead to efficiencies, it complicates problems that are cross-functional in nature. It further complicates strategic planning because each stove pipe tends to plan around its short-term needs.
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Size of the WORKFORCE box (or number of employees) is determined by requirements and funding.Slide is intended to present an example of the variables that impact workforce size, composition, and capability. It just isn’t about advertising positions and hiring new staff. Factors like the education of the candidate pool (how well to colleges prepare young engineers to work for the Army?), quality of the surrounding community (do candidates want to live where we have installations?), and the economic strength of the surrounding community (does the economy offer ample positions for family members?) all play roles beyond various DoD and Army policies and procedures for hiring.How do we get the right person in the right position at the right time given these constraints?
  • Briefer: To comply with the Commander’s intent (IMCP V3) – we must begin to not only understand systems thinking but actually practice it. How often do we get stuck in “bailing mode” and neglect the larger problem? How often do we watch as a coworker or another organization struggles with an issue that we contribute to – and don’t help? Can you think of an example where a problem has had a serious impact on the mission and you thought it was too bad but not your issue? If someone provides an example – you’ll need to explore the problem – ask who had proponency? Explore the variable that contribute to the problem – did the y really only involve the proponent organization?If no one provides an example – provide one – energy usage is an easy one, endangered species is another one where we tend to think about DPW-ENV but should get them to the point where they understand habitat destruction outside the installation is what pushes species into undeveloped installation training space. Once DPTM and DPW EN work together – the headache of endangered species is not as great. If we go beyond just fixing stuff inside our fence line – we’ll see even greater results – talk about the Fort Huachuca ACUB program and how it is helping protect habitat and preserving training land buffers…
  • Briefer: Communication is critical -
  • Briefer:
  • Briefer: Do a short exercise by asking who works in their capacity at IMCOM with training ranges?
  • Briefer:
  • Briefer:
  • Briefer:
  • Briefer: The ISSP has been deployed at over 40 installations, State National Guards, and Military communities. The process has evolved over time to meet changing requirements and installation-specific considerations.
  • Briefer: During the goal-setting session of the ISSP process the regional government sent their expert on sustainable development (who was initiating their effort) to participate in the Garrison-wide Strategic Planning effort (long-term goal-setting activity). The community partnership group (one of the goals set is about partnerships with host nation stakeholders) expanded and developed ideas during the subsequent action planning effort. This regional partnership evolved from the initial strategic planning (ISSP) process.As part of their ISSP preparation activities, USAG Hohenfels identified a developing sustainability program hosted by the Host Nation regional government. The partnership seeks to promote sustainable development and economic well-being in the region among community, business, academic, and governmental stakeholders – now including USAG Hohenfels. The installation invited community leaders to participate in portions of the installation goal-setting session.
  • Briefer: The Sustainability Covenant’s Goal is to present opportunities for cooperation in economic, cultural, and other areas between the Hohenfels Military Community and the County of Neumarkt and surrounding communities. The Participants pledged to work together in the areas of renewable energy, housing, environmental protection, quality of life, and economic development.“The Covenant is designed to focus on … what all of us need to do today to become more sustainable in how we operate, work, and live,” JMRC Commander Col. John M. Spiszer “This is necessary for all of us economically, as good neighbors, and as good stewards of this earth and its resources.”
  • Briefer: The Sustainability Covenant’s Goal is to present opportunities for cooperation in economic, cultural, and other areas between the Hohenfels Military Community and the County of Neumarkt and surrounding communities. The Participants pledged to work together in the areas of renewable energy, housing, environmental protection, quality of life, and economic development.“The Covenant is designed to focus on … what all of us need to do today to become more sustainable in how we operate, work, and live,” JMRC Commander Col. John M. Spiszer “This is necessary for all of us economically, as good neighbors, and as good stewards of this earth and its resources.”
  • Briefer: The Sustainability Covenant’s Goal is to present opportunities for cooperation in economic, cultural, and other areas between the Hohenfels Military Community and the County of Neumarkt and surrounding communities. The Participants pledged to work together in the areas of renewable energy, housing, environmental protection, quality of life, and economic development.“The Covenant is designed to focus on … what all of us need to do today to become more sustainable in how we operate, work, and live,” JMRC Commander Col. John M. Spiszer “This is necessary for all of us economically, as good neighbors, and as good stewards of this earth and its resources.”
  • Briefer: The Sustainability Covenant’s Goal is to present opportunities for cooperation in economic, cultural, and other areas between the Hohenfels Military Community and the County of Neumarkt and surrounding communities. The Participants pledged to work together in the areas of renewable energy, housing, environmental protection, quality of life, and economic development.“The Covenant is designed to focus on … what all of us need to do today to become more sustainable in how we operate, work, and live,” JMRC Commander Col. John M. Spiszer “This is necessary for all of us economically, as good neighbors, and as good stewards of this earth and its resources.”
  • Briefer: The Sustainability Covenant’s Goal is to present opportunities for cooperation in economic, cultural, and other areas between the Hohenfels Military Community and the County of Neumarkt and surrounding communities. The Participants pledged to work together in the areas of renewable energy, housing, environmental protection, quality of life, and economic development.“The Covenant is designed to focus on … what all of us need to do today to become more sustainable in how we operate, work, and live,” JMRC Commander Col. John M. Spiszer “This is necessary for all of us economically, as good neighbors, and as good stewards of this earth and its resources.”
  • Briefer: Our traditional approach would be to contact the Corps who could develop a price based upon the requirements, access standard designs, develop the contract (write, bid, award) and oversee execution. We would pick a site and everything would move forward. This approach, however, presented additional challenges:Conventional cost was prohibitiveTime to bid and build could not meet need in the desired timeframeNo appropriate standard design available
  • Briefer: Fort Bragg Iraqi Village “Freedom City” Situation:The crowded schedule at Fort Bragg’s two other MOUT training villages threatened to hold back the deployment of units during March 2004. Over one third of 48,000 soldiers training on the installation were being deployed to Iraq at any given time, in addition to thousands of reserve and NG soldiers mobilized for the then termed Global War on Terror. In addition, the existing urban training sites were built to simulate more traditional towns, not realistic Iraqi villages. Fort Bragg needed another training facility and they needed it fast! First thoughts conjure up traditional a vision of funding and build out taking several months…if not longer….to construct at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars that was not allocated in the budget. This left Range Officer (Mr. Bill Edwards) thinking ‘out-of-the-box’. He and the Director of Plans, Training and Mobilization decided to put their sustainability hats on and build a facility completely using in-house labor and available materials already on the installation, including material located in the installation landfill. The results are impressive… Fort Bragg’s range control staff built the entire village in 3 months, working with only photographs of buildings located in Iraq (no blueprints). Fifty salvaged steel transport containers became the buildings enhanced by plywood to round the corners of arches and domes. The structure was painted using one hundred gallons of paint that came from the recycling center. The roads, like most dirt tracks on Fort Bragg, are surfaced with tons of ground concrete from the foundations of deconstructed buildings. Principles of Sustainability applied:Mission Excellence: Soldiers are provided realistic training prior to deployment in theater.Community Collaboration: Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg staff to coordinate the reuse of salvaged materials from the installation’s landfill and reuse center.Environmental Stewardship: Materials were diverted from traditional disposal the installation landfill thus lessening solid and hazardous waste (paint) generation and eliminating the burden on natural resources (materials, water, energy)that would have resulted in the traditional use new virgin materials.Economic Benefit: Project financial cost were roughly $4,500 and cost avoidance included more than$420,000 of new building material (standard construction cost).Systems Thinking: Even today this project supports LOE 1 Soldier, Family & Civilian Readiness, LOE 3 Leader and Workforce Development, and LOE 4 Installation Readiness. Personnel innovativeness in this project brings home an understanding of the human capital (level of knowledge and willingness to apply that knowledge in non-traditional ways) contribution towards a sustainable installation.
  • Briefer: Fort Bragg Iraqi Village “Freedom City” Situation:The crowded schedule at Fort Bragg’s two other MOUT training villages threatened to hold back the deployment of units during March 2004. Over one third of 48,000 soldiers training on the installation were being deployed to Iraq at any given time, in addition to thousands of reserve and NG soldiers mobilized for the then termed Global War on Terror. In addition, the existing urban training sites were built to simulate more traditional towns, not realistic Iraqi villages. Fort Bragg needed another training facility and they needed it fast! First thoughts conjure up traditional a vision of funding and build out taking several months…if not longer….to construct at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars that was not allocated in the budget. This left Range Officer (Mr. Bill Edwards) thinking ‘out-of-the-box’. He and the Director of Plans, Training and Mobilization decided to put their sustainability hats on and build a facility completely using in-house labor and available materials already on the installation, including material located in the installation landfill. The results are impressive… Fort Bragg’s range control staff built the entire village in 3 months, working with only photographs of buildings located in Iraq (no blueprints). Fifty salvaged steel transport containers became the buildings enhanced by plywood to round the corners of arches and domes. The structure was painted using one hundred gallons of paint that came from the recycling center. The roads, like most dirt tracks on Fort Bragg, are surfaced with tons of ground concrete from the foundations of deconstructed buildings. Principles of Sustainability applied:Mission Excellence: Soldiers are provided realistic training prior to deployment in theater.Community Collaboration: Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg staff to coordinate the reuse of salvaged materials from the installation’s landfill and reuse center.Environmental Stewardship: Materials were diverted from traditional disposal the installation landfill thus lessening solid and hazardous waste (paint) generation and eliminating the burden on natural resources (materials, water, energy)that would have resulted in the traditional use new virgin materials.Economic Benefit: Project financial cost were roughly $4,500 and cost avoidance included more than$420,000 of new building material (standard construction cost).Systems Thinking: Even today this project supports LOE 1 Soldier, Family & Civilian Readiness, LOE 3 Leader and Workforce Development, and LOE 4 Installation Readiness. Personnel innovativeness in this project brings home an understanding of the human capital (level of knowledge and willingness to apply that knowledge in non-traditional ways) contribution towards a sustainable installation.
  • Briefer: Fort Bragg Iraqi Village “Freedom City” Situation:The crowded schedule at Fort Bragg’s two other MOUT training villages threatened to hold back the deployment of units during March 2004. Over one third of 48,000 soldiers training on the installation were being deployed to Iraq at any given time, in addition to thousands of reserve and NG soldiers mobilized for the then termed Global War on Terror. In addition, the existing urban training sites were built to simulate more traditional towns, not realistic Iraqi villages. Fort Bragg needed another training facility and they needed it fast! First thoughts conjure up traditional a vision of funding and build out taking several months…if not longer….to construct at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars that was not allocated in the budget. This left Range Officer (Mr. Bill Edwards) thinking ‘out-of-the-box’. He and the Director of Plans, Training and Mobilization decided to put their sustainability hats on and build a facility completely using in-house labor and available materials already on the installation, including material located in the installation landfill. The results are impressive… Fort Bragg’s range control staff built the entire village in 3 months, working with only photographs of buildings located in Iraq (no blueprints). Fifty salvaged steel transport containers became the buildings enhanced by plywood to round the corners of arches and domes. The structure was painted using one hundred gallons of paint that came from the recycling center. The roads, like most dirt tracks on Fort Bragg, are surfaced with tons of ground concrete from the foundations of deconstructed buildings. Principles of Sustainability applied:Mission Excellence: Soldiers are provided realistic training prior to deployment in theater.Community Collaboration: Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg staff to coordinate the reuse of salvaged materials from the installation’s landfill and reuse center.Environmental Stewardship: Materials were diverted from traditional disposal the installation landfill thus lessening solid and hazardous waste (paint) generation and eliminating the burden on natural resources (materials, water, energy)that would have resulted in the traditional use new virgin materials.Economic Benefit: Project financial cost were roughly $4,500 and cost avoidance included more than$420,000 of new building material (standard construction cost).Systems Thinking: Even today this project supports LOE 1 Soldier, Family & Civilian Readiness, LOE 3 Leader and Workforce Development, and LOE 4 Installation Readiness. Personnel innovativeness in this project brings home an understanding of the human capital (level of knowledge and willingness to apply that knowledge in non-traditional ways) contribution towards a sustainable installation.
  • Briefer: Fort Bragg Iraqi Village “Freedom City” Situation:The crowded schedule at Fort Bragg’s two other MOUT training villages threatened to hold back the deployment of units during March 2004. Over one third of 48,000 soldiers training on the installation were being deployed to Iraq at any given time, in addition to thousands of reserve and NG soldiers mobilized for the then termed Global War on Terror. In addition, the existing urban training sites were built to simulate more traditional towns, not realistic Iraqi villages. Fort Bragg needed another training facility and they needed it fast! First thoughts conjure up traditional a vision of funding and build out taking several months…if not longer….to construct at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars that was not allocated in the budget. This left Range Officer (Mr. Bill Edwards) thinking ‘out-of-the-box’. He and the Director of Plans, Training and Mobilization decided to put their sustainability hats on and build a facility completely using in-house labor and available materials already on the installation, including material located in the installation landfill. The results are impressive… Fort Bragg’s range control staff built the entire village in 3 months, working with only photographs of buildings located in Iraq (no blueprints). Fifty salvaged steel transport containers became the buildings enhanced by plywood to round the corners of arches and domes. The structure was painted using one hundred gallons of paint that came from the recycling center. The roads, like most dirt tracks on Fort Bragg, are surfaced with tons of ground concrete from the foundations of deconstructed buildings. Principles of Sustainability applied:Mission Excellence: Soldiers are provided realistic training prior to deployment in theater.Community Collaboration: Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg staff to coordinate the reuse of salvaged materials from the installation’s landfill and reuse center.Environmental Stewardship: Materials were diverted from traditional disposal the installation landfill thus lessening solid and hazardous waste (paint) generation and eliminating the burden on natural resources (materials, water, energy)that would have resulted in the traditional use new virgin materials.Economic Benefit: Project financial cost were roughly $4,500 and cost avoidance included more than$420,000 of new building material (standard construction cost).Systems Thinking: Even today this project supports LOE 1 Soldier, Family & Civilian Readiness, LOE 3 Leader and Workforce Development, and LOE 4 Installation Readiness. Personnel innovativeness in this project brings home an understanding of the human capital (level of knowledge and willingness to apply that knowledge in non-traditional ways) contribution towards a sustainable installation.
  • Briefer: The impact of family housing can be substantial in terms of the operational costs to families – energy bills continue to rise. For some military Families this represents a growing financial concern. Further, houses represent, nationally, a significant consumer of resources – power and water.
  • Centralized campus that provides support to all within the community who need it. Provides various types of support to include recreational, fitness, spiritual, cultural, and counseling. Comprehensive services within one area.
  • One of the largest and most extensive solar air heating projects in the world has now been completed for the United States Military base at Fort Drum, in upstate New York. The project is extremely significant in terms of the sheer magnitude of energy and CO2 savings, and it shows the tremendous potential for solar thermal when it is deployed on alarge scale.In the fall of 2005, the Army Corp of Engineers at the base commissioned a multimillion dollar retrofit program to upgrade 27 of their vehicle maintenance buildings. Conserval Engineering and Conserval Systems worked closely with the militarybase over the two year duration of the contract in the design and installation of the SolarWall transpired collector systems. SolarWall systems had previously been installed at six other U.S. military bases. This project was one of the reasons why the U.S. Corp of Engineers, in 2006, identified the transpired collector as one of two cost effectivetechnologies ideally suited for military buildings, such as vehicle maintenance garages.Types of Buildings Selected for SolarWall® SystemsTypical military buildings, such as vehicle maintenance garages, hangars, and warehouses are ideal for solar air heating. They have a high ventilation load which represents an enormous energy expenditure given the tremendous volume of air that has to be continuously brought in and then heated over the entire heating season. As well, these buildings have large wall surfaces available, which makes it easy to integrate a SolarWall system into the exterior façade.The SolarWall panels were mounted 6 to 10 inches from the exterior wall to create an air cavity. The heated boundary layer is drawn off the panels and through the perforations into the air cavity behind. From there, it is either directed into the HVAC units or into the building through a fan and ducting system.Conserval Engineering customized the interior heat distribution for optimal performance in each building. In total, 99 fans are being used to deliver 300,000 cfm of air. As well, new air makeup fans and distribution ducting were installed to improve the ventilation air in some of the older facilities. In some cases the air was brought in through wall fans, in other cases through roof mounted fans or HVAC units. The issue of destratification was present in many of the buildings; the temperature at the ceiling of tall hangars was as much as 20 F (12 C) hotter than floor temperature prior to theinstallations. The SolarWall ducting systems were designed to minimize the stratified ceiling heat, resulting in additional energy savings.The $3 million that was allocated to the turnkey SolarWall project will allow the base to generate a minimum of 4MW of thermal energy. It will displace 2,000 tons of CO2 annually by reducing 44,000 million BTU/h (46,000 GJ) of natural gas each year. From a cost and energy production perspective, these values illustrate the financial attractiveness of the SolarWall solar air heating system. The SolarWall project at Fort Drum also created ten man years’ worth of work, whichhighlights the local job creation benefits of solar
  • Ft. CarsonECIP: • 2 MW, 12-acre facility on former landfill, the largest solar array built at a U.S. Army facility at the time of construction. • Through a power purchase agreement with Fort Carson, Colorado Springs Utilities builds and maintains the solar PV facility and provides the Fort with lower-cost electricity in return for leasing the site. • Solar array will generate enough electricity annually to power 540 homes, or 2.3% of the Fort’s energy consumption. • Project expected to save Fort Carson $500,000 in energy costs over the life of its 20-year contract with the utility.  In 2008, a 2-megawatt (MW), ground-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) array was designed and constructed at Fort Carson, CO. The landmark PV project produces enough power for approximately 540 homes and covers nearly 15 acres. At the time of development, it was the largest onsite solar plant in Colorado and the largest solar array at a U.S. Army facility.The farm resides on a closed landfill, containing mostly C&D debris and regulated as a solid waste management unit. Fort Carson is purchasing electricity produced from the array at a fixed rate of 5.5 cents per kilowatt hour for the duration of a 17-year contract. An estimated savings of $500,000 in electricity costs is expected during the life of the contract.Generating 3,200 megawatt-hours (MWh) of solar power annually, the ground-mounted solar array consists of flat-plate, thin-film solar technology which is warranted for 25 years, and the plant can be expected to produce energy efficiently for up to 40 years. Special engineering/design was required for the solar array construction in order to accommodate the waste that still exists 2'-8' below the surface. The landfill cover remedy was prioritized and funded by the Army Environmental Command.The project represents the collaboration of numerous additional players including energy companies, an investment firm, utilities, a federal power marketing administration, U.S. Army Environmental Center, Fort Carson Army Installation and the state of Colorado. The private companies developed, engineered, installed and financed the project. Denver-based Xcel Energy will purchase the renewable energy certificates for 20 years under its Solar*Rewards Program. Colorado Springs Utilities provides services to Fort Carson and will host the system on its grid. Under its power marketing authority, Western Area Power Administration's Rocky Mountain Region will procure the power from the system for Fort Carson. The project supports a long-term energy goal for Fort Carson to sustain all facility mobility systems from renewable sources by 2027. Fort Carson won the Governor's Renewable Energy Award for 2007 for its efforts in the solar array project. Extra Info:The solar farm is not located on just any old 15 acre lot, but was constructed on a closed landfill with limited reuse potential; a good fit for low-impact solar PVs. Closed in 1973, the landfill contains mostly construction and demolition debris and is regulated as a solid waste management unit with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. Continued coordination with the State of Colorado was essential to making this project a success.Reflecting the U.S. Army's strong commitment to clean and renewable energy, the solar farm uses Colorado’s abundant sunshine and available federal land to realize Fort Carson’s energy future. This project also represents the first major customer-sited project to emerge from Colorado’s voter-led initiative to make the state a leading user of renewable energy. This project should inspire others of its kind increasing solar energy generation across the country and world. The Fort Carson effort was managed by Stephanie Carter and Vince Guthrie. Carter's role as the Directorate of Public Works utilities program manager was to prepare the landfill for construction. Guthrie, an industrial engineer with the DPW operations and maintenance division, coordinated the efforts of all the organizations involved.
  • Briefer: But what does sustainable really mean?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Welcome<br />1<br />
    • 2. Army Sustainability Concepts, Principles and PracticesInstallation Management Command(IMCOM)<br />2<br />
    • 3. Internal &amp; External Pressures on the Mission<br />NATIVE AMERICAN<br />AND ARCHEOLOGICAL<br />RESOURCES<br />CLEAN AIR<br />AND WATER<br />HISTORIC<br />PRESERVATION<br />SAFE DRINKING<br />WATER<br />HAZARDOUS<br />WASTE<br />Infrastructure, Procurement, Transportation, Training Lands, Ranges, Regional Development, Managed Growth, Education, Workforce, Economic Impact<br />NOISE<br />ENDANGERED <br />SPECIES AND<br />CRITICAL HABITAT<br />MUNITIONS REGULATION<br />AIRSPACE<br />URBANIZATION AND<br />OTHER LAND USE<br />ENCROACHMENT<br />FREQUENCY ALLOCATION<br />… AND DEMAND IS INCREASING<br />3<br />
    • 4. 4<br />4<br />
    • 5. St. Mere Eglise Drop Zone at Fort Bragg, NC<br />5<br />
    • 6. Traditional Problem Solving<br />Stove piped<br />Decisions based upon limited variables (cost, time to execute)<br />Formulaic based upon previous solutions– “we’ve always done it that way”<br />Standardized<br />6<br />
    • 7. Traditional Problem Solving<br />Stove piped<br />Decisions based upon limited variables (cost, time to execute)<br />Formulaic based upon previous solutions– “we’ve always done it that way”<br />Standardized<br />Analytical Thinking<br />7<br />
    • 8. The Problem is…<br />The causes of these pressures are not created by those assigned to manage them, the solutions don’t necessarily fit into the stove pipes we have used in the past to plan for and manage installations…<br />8<br />
    • 9. Example: Workforce<br />Workforce<br />9<br />
    • 10. Example: Workforce<br />Workforce<br />US DAC<br />US non-DAC<br />US Military<br />Employee Pools<br />Military retirees<br />Local workforce<br />Family members<br />= Rules controlling flow (i.e., how quickly or slowly; hiring freeze; downsizing)<br />10<br />
    • 11. Example: Workforce<br />Workforce<br />US DAC<br />Retirees<br />US non-DAC<br />5-yr Rule<br />US Military<br />Deploy<br />Employee Pools<br />Employee Losses<br />Military retirees<br />Terminated<br />Local workforce<br />Disability<br />Family members<br />Quit<br />= Rules controlling flow (i.e., how quickly or slowly; hiring freeze; downsizing)<br />11<br />
    • 12. Example: Workforce<br />Changing Mission<br />Workforce<br />US DAC<br />Retirees<br />US non-DAC<br />5-yr Rule<br />US Military<br />Deploy<br />Employee Pools<br />Employee Losses<br />Military retirees<br />Terminated<br />Local workforce<br />Disability<br />Family members<br />Quit<br />= Rules controlling flow (i.e., how quickly or slowly; hiring freeze; downsizing)<br />12<br />
    • 13. Example: Workforce<br />Education Level/ Salary Competitiveness<br />Changing Mission<br />Workforce<br />US DAC<br />Retirees<br />US non-DAC<br />5-yr Rule<br />US Military<br />Deploy<br />Employee Pools<br />Employee Losses<br />Military retirees<br />Terminated<br />Local workforce<br />Disability<br />Family members<br />Quit<br />= Rules controlling flow (i.e., how quickly or slowly; hiring freeze; downsizing)<br />13<br />
    • 14. Example: Workforce<br />Education Level/ Salary Competitiveness<br />Amenities of the host Community<br />Changing Mission<br />Workforce<br />US DAC<br />Retirees<br />US non-DAC<br />5-yr Rule<br />US Military<br />Deploy<br />Employee Pools<br />Employee Losses<br />Military retirees<br />Terminated<br />Local workforce<br />Disability<br />Family members<br />Quit<br />= Rules controlling flow (i.e., how quickly or slowly; hiring freeze; downsizing)<br />14<br />
    • 15. Army Sustainability<br />“Is not an individual program; rather, it is an organizing paradigm that improves our ability to organize, equip, train and deploy our Soldiers as part of the Joint Force today and into the future. Army Sustainability objectives are to meet current and future mission requirements worldwide, safeguard human health, improve quality of life, and enhance the natural environment.”<br />—2011 Army Posture Statement<br />15<br />15<br />
    • 16. “We must strive to become<br />systems thinkers…”<br />16<br />
    • 17. Consider this Description of A System<br />“It is large, rough, wide, and broad like a rug”<br />“It is a straight, hollow pipe – awful, destructive”<br />“It is mighty and firm, like a pillar”<br />17<br />
    • 18. We each have a unique perspective…<br />An elephant is like a wire brush<br />An elephant can move air<br />An elephant is made of a valuable material<br />An elephant is like a tree trunk<br />An elephant is like a rope<br />An elephant is like a hydraulic press<br />An elephant is soft &amp; mushy<br />An elephant is like a snake<br />An elephant has a suction valve<br />18<br />
    • 19. 19<br />9/14/2011<br />It starts with understanding your system…<br />19<br />
    • 20. Or your system of systems …<br />20<br />20<br />9/14/2011<br />20<br />
    • 21. Purpose of the Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning Process<br /><ul><li>Engage community stakeholders (inside and outside the fence-line) throughout the process to provide an open forum to convey and better understand mutual needs
    • 22. Strengthen existing and establish new relationships with our community partners
    • 23. Create ownership of an installation-wide strategic plan, goals, and action plans amongst a broader group of the installation’s stakeholders (garrison, tenants, surrounding community, et al) </li></ul>21<br />
    • 24. Purpose of the Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning Process<br /><ul><li>Enable an integrated and collaborative cycle of planning and execution that allows IMCOM personnel to keep their eye on the goal, even when bogged down with daily operations
    • 25. Develop 25-year goals that will instill a vision of an enduring installation that adds value to the Army now and in the future
    • 26. Communicate the IMCOM principles of sustainability and build a transcending roadmap that establishes an enduring installation ethos </li></ul>22<br />
    • 27. IMCOM Sustainability Principles<br />Mission Excellence<br />23<br />
    • 28. IMCOM Sustainability Principles<br />Mission Excellence<br />Environmental Stewardship<br />24<br />
    • 29. IMCOM Sustainability Principles<br />Mission Excellence<br />Environmental Stewardship<br />Community Collaboration<br />25<br />
    • 30. IMCOM Sustainability Principles<br />Mission Excellence<br />Environmental Stewardship<br />Community Collaboration<br />Economic Benefit<br />26<br />
    • 31. IMCOM Sustainability Principles<br />Mission Excellence<br />Environmental Stewardship<br />Systems<br />Thinking<br />Community Collaboration<br />Economic Benefit<br />27<br />
    • 32. Key<br />ISSP* Deployment <br />(as of May 2011)<br />IMCOM Installations<br />Other Army/Joint Bases<br />JB Lewis/McCord <br />and Yakima TC**<br />State ARNG<br />IMCOM/Community<br />MN ARNG<br />Ft Drum<br />PA ARNG<br />Letterkenny AD<br />CA ARNG<br />OH ARNG<br />NV ARNG<br />CO ARNG<br />JB Langley-Eustis, <br />Ft Detrick, Ft Monroe<br />Ft Leonard Wood**<br />Ft Carson<br />Ft Riley**<br />Ft AP Hill<br />Ft Lee<br />Southern Colorado <br />Sustainability<br />Ft Campbell<br />Mohave Military<br />Ft Bragg**<br />AZ ARNG<br />Sandhills<br />Ft Sill***<br />Ft Jackson<br />Ft Benning<br />Pacific<br />Ft Huachuca<br />Ft McPherson<br />USAG Japan***<br />Anniston AD<br />Ft Stewart<br />Ft Hood<br />Ft Rucker**<br />Central TX<br />Ft Polk<br />USAG Hawaii<br />Ft Greely<br />Europe<br />Ft Wainwright<br />USAGs Baumholder**, Grafenwohr, Hohenfels, Kaiserslautern**, Vicenza, and Wiesbaden<br />*Integrated Strategic and Sustainability Planning<br />**Sustainability incorporated into Installation Strategic Plan<br />***No known plans to move forward with ISSP process<br />HI Services Working Group <br />28<br />
    • 33. US Army Garrison Hohenfels<br />Sustainability Covenant<br />Stronger cooperation between the Army and surrounding communities:<br />Economic development<br />Renewable energy<br />Environmental protection<br />Housing<br />29<br />
    • 34. Sustainable Communities Partnership<br />Joint Multination Readiness Center (USAG Hohenfels), Neumarkt County, Hohenfels, Lupburg, Parsberg, Velburg<br />30<br />
    • 35. Sustainable Communities Partnership<br />Soldier/<br />Family <br />Housing<br />Joint Multination Readiness Center (USAG Hohenfels), Neumarkt County, Hohenfels, Lupburg, Parsberg, Velburg<br />31<br />
    • 36. Sustainable Communities Partnership<br />Soldier/<br />Family <br />Housing<br />Sustainable<br />communities initiative<br />Joint Multination Readiness Center (USAG Hohenfels), Neumarkt County, Hohenfels, Lupburg, Parsberg, Velburg<br />32<br />
    • 37. Sustainable Communities Partnership<br />Soldier/<br />Family <br />Housing<br />Sustainable<br />communities initiative<br />Economic <br />and cultural<br />cooperation<br />Joint Multination Readiness Center (USAG Hohenfels), Neumarkt County, Hohenfels, Lupburg, Parsberg, Velburg<br />33<br />
    • 38. Sustainable Communities Partnership<br />Soldier/<br />Family <br />Housing<br />Renewable energy and environmental protection<br />Sustainable<br />communities initiative<br />Economic <br />and cultural<br />cooperation<br />Joint Multination Readiness Center (USAG Hohenfels), Neumarkt County, Hohenfels, Lupburg, Parsberg, Velburg<br />34<br />
    • 39. Ft Bragg<br />Energy Efficiency and Security Wood Waste to Liquid Fuel<br />Problem<br />Ft Bragg landfills 9000 tons of wood per year, cost over $700k<br />DoD landfills 1.1 Millions tons of wood per year at a cost of $90M<br />Value of wood as an energy source is being tossed away<br />Solution<br />Pyrolyze wood into BioOil to fuel boilers and fixed engines<br />Potential energy value at Bragg $1.2 M per year; DoD $142 M per year<br />DoD funds granted to install unit on Bragg and validate performance ($1.1M)<br />Solution<br />Renewable Oil International® LLC <br />5 dry ton per day plant<br />
    • 40. Urgent Training Need<br />Systems thinking in action…<br />36<br />
    • 41. Soldier Readiness Fort Bragg – Freedom CityUrban Training Facility<br />Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg Staff<br />37<br />
    • 42. Soldier Readiness Fort Bragg – Freedom CityUrban Training Facility<br />Materials diverted from landfill; HazMat reuse<br />Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg Staff<br />38<br />
    • 43. Soldier Readiness Fort Bragg – Freedom CityUrban Training Facility<br />Urgent and <br />realistic<br />training <br />provided in<br />3 months<br />Materials diverted from landfill; HM reuse<br />Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg Staff<br />39<br />
    • 44. Soldier Readiness Fort Bragg – Freedom CityUrban Training Facility<br />Urgent and <br />realistic<br />training <br />provided in<br />3 months<br />Materials diverted from landfill; HM reuse<br />Teamwork amongst the Fort Bragg Staff<br />Projected <br />Cost: $420K<br />Actual Cost: <br />$4.5K<br />40<br />
    • 45. Fort Campbell Sustainability Goals: “Expand Use of Renewable Energy” and “Sustainable Technology Demonstration Projects”<br />New, Efficient Housing<br />41<br />
    • 46. Fort Campbell… partnering to advance <br />net-zero energy technology <br />Zero Energy Homes<br />Baseline Homes<br /><ul><li>IN ADDITION:
    • 47. Compare to national standards and comparable duplexes at Fort Campbell
    • 48. Monthly feedback and discussion with families
    • 49. Spring and fall surveys of families re comfort and satisfaction</li></ul>42<br />
    • 50. Fort Campbell… partnering to advance <br />net-zero energy technology <br />Baseline Homes<br />ZEHs<br /><ul><li>IN ADDITION:
    • 51. Compare to national standards and comparable duplexes at Fort Campbell
    • 52. Monthly feedback and discussion with families
    • 53. Spring and fall surveys of families re comfort and satisfaction</li></ul>Strategic partnerships established<br />43<br />
    • 54. Fort Campbell… partnering to advance <br />net-zero energy technology <br />Baseline Homes<br />ZEHs<br />Soldier/<br />Family<br />educated on <br />energy and <br />water <br />usage<br /><ul><li>IN ADDITION:
    • 55. Compare to national standards and comparable duplexes at Fort Campbell
    • 56. Monthly feedback and discussion with families
    • 57. Spring and fall surveys of families re comfort and satisfaction</li></ul>Strategic partnerships established<br />44<br />
    • 58. Fort Campbell… partnering to advance <br />net-zero energy technology <br />Baseline Homes<br />ZEHs<br />Soldier/<br />Family<br />educated on <br />energy and <br />water <br />usage<br /><ul><li>IN ADDITION:
    • 59. Compare to national standards and comparable duplexes at Fort Campbell
    • 60. Monthly feedback and discussion with families
    • 61. Spring and fall surveys of families re comfort and satisfaction</li></ul>Uses 54% <br />less energy (16 tons CO2) and 27% less water<br />Strategic partnerships established<br />45<br />
    • 62. Fort Campbell… partnering to advance <br />net-zero energy technology <br />Baseline Homes<br />ZEHs<br />Soldier/<br />Family<br />educated on <br />energy and <br />water <br />usage<br /><ul><li>IN ADDITION:
    • 63. Compare to national standards and comparable duplexes at Fort Campbell
    • 64. Monthly feedback and discussion with families
    • 65. Spring and fall surveys of families re comfort and satisfaction</li></ul>Uses 54% <br />less energy (16 tons CO2) and 27% less water<br />Strategic partnerships established<br />Partner <br />funded<br />enhancements; <br />$854K<br />46<br />
    • 66. MattressLife-Cycles<br />Solutions<br />Ft Bragg refurbishes, saving 50%<br />Ft Jackson buys 100% foam units; maker takes back and recycles<br />Ft Gordon donates, buys foam<br />Redstone Arsenal recycles coil units for credit toward new foam<br />Problem<br />Landfills starting to ban mattresses (not profitable: high volume/low weight) <br />Recycling options very limited<br />Procurement alternatives few<br />Solution<br />
    • 67. Fort Hood Resiliency Campus<br />Building 12019 <br />Wellness Center and Performance Lab<br />Building 12007<br />Culinary Arts Center<br />Building 12020<br />Army Center for Enhanced Performance, <br />Personal Financial Assistance Center, <br />Military and Family Life Consultant Center<br />Building 12018<br />Functional Fitness Center<br />Playground<br />Building 12025<br />Kids on Site (KOS)<br />Building 12012 <br />Spiritual Fitness Center<br />Par Course &amp;<br />Putting Green<br />Reflection Pond<br />Building 12022<br /> Headquarters<br />
    • 68. Fort Drum, NY - Solar Walls Energy Efficiency and Security <br /><ul><li>50 SolarWall® heating systems installed on 27 utility &amp; maintenance buildings
    • 69. 110,000 square feet (10,220 m2) of solar panels
    • 70. 300,000 cfm of air heated with 99 fans
    • 71. Projected fuels savings of 44 billion BTU/h per year
    • 72. 4 MW of thermal energy capacity
    • 73. 2,000 tons of CO2 displacement per year</li></ul>Solar wall on aircraft hanger<br />One of the world’s largest arrays of solar air heated buildings<br />
    • 74. Fort Carson<br />Energy Efficiency and Security <br />• 2 MW, 12-acre facility on former landfill, the largest solar array built at a U.S. Army facility at the time of construction. <br />• Through a power purchase agreement with Fort Carson, Colorado Springs Utilities builds and maintains the solar PV facility and provides the Fort with lower-cost electricity in return for leasing the site. <br />
    • 75. Sustainability is…<br />About changing the way everyone addresses problems<br />A framework for transitioning to systems-based solutions<br />An approach for creating truly enduring installations that are adaptable and efficient<br />About providing the best location for its mission and Military community<br />
    • 76. Doing Sustainability seems easy, right?<br /><ul><li>What does it mean to have a sustainable installation?
    • 77. What does that look like?
    • 78. How much has changed at your garrison since you conducted your sustainability planning efforts?
    • 79. What is a sustainable mission?
    • 80. Community Services?
    • 81. Workforce?
    • 82. Infrastructure?</li></ul>52<br />
    • 83. For information on sustainability at <br />Joint Base Lewis-McChord: <br />https://sustainablefortlewis.army.mil<br />or contact <br />lewisdpwedpr@us.army.mil<br />

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