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Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund
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Grant Writing Tips from the Greenbelt Fund

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Presentation by Brendan Wylie-Toal, Grant Program Specialist with the Greenbelt Fund. Prepared for "What Makes A Good Funding Application?" members-only webinar hosted by Sustain Ontario and the …

Presentation by Brendan Wylie-Toal, Grant Program Specialist with the Greenbelt Fund. Prepared for "What Makes A Good Funding Application?" members-only webinar hosted by Sustain Ontario and the Golden Horseshoe Food and Farming Alliance on August 6th, 2014.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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  • Most people spend their time in stages 2 and 3, but the focus really needs to be on stage 1. It is in this stage that you will be able to add structure to project and determine if it is worth spending time writing a proposal. Spending time in stage 1 can save wasting time in subsequent stages.
  • Know your funder
    What are their priorities?
    What language do they use? If you’re applying to McConnell, for example, make sure you talk about tipping points, or theory of change.
    Make sure your application aligns with their mission and mandate
    Make sure the project fits the priorities of the granting program
    With some applications, it’s clear that project was developed before the application was submitted. This is fine, as long as the project fits the funding guidelines. However, in some cases there will be scope creep.
    Make sure the benefits of the project align with the desired outcomes for the grantor. It can’t all be about you.
    Call the funder to discuss your idea
    Funders want good ideas. Don’t be afraid to bounce ideas off them to see what might be the best fit.
  • Have a well scoped out/thought out work plan
    You should focus a lot of your time developing your work plan. You may have a great project concept, but if you can’t demonstrate how you will get from A to B, then it makes it difficult to assess the project.
    Understand how the grant will be assessed. If certain metrics will be used, make sure you have thought out how you will measure these outcomes.
    Make sure you have the requisite information needed to properly evaluate the grant.
    Difference between Activities, Goals, and Outcomes
  • Make sure you have the proper partners and/or letters of support
    Ex: an applicant wants to bring a new local food to market. In this example, an applicant that has partnered with retailers or distributors will be assessed more favourably than an applicant that is missing such support.
    Make sure your budget is detailed
    Any line items in the budget should be mentioned in the proposal.
    Ex: if you’re asking for a consultant or equipment, make sure the need for that item is described in the application.
  • Writing
    Make sure you cover the Why, How, and What.
    Use clear language.
    Especially with non-profits, there is a tendency to use vague language. This not only adds to the word count, it also makes it very difficult to determine what the project is about. Especially when it comes to describing activities, use clear language.
    Be concise
    Funders have to evaluate dozens of proposals, so try to be as concise as possible. I try to get everything written down, and then go through and remove unnecessary sentences and clarify pieces.
  • Properly assess the risks and shortcomings of your proposal. Be ready to answer follow-up questions.
    Every proposal will have it’s flaws. Try to look at your proposal from the Funder’s perspective to expose shortcomings or gaps. If you find some, try to address them before submitting. For gaps that can’t be addressed, be prepared to answer questions about them.
    What are your contingency plans is something goes awry.
    Review, review, review
    Have someone outside the project team read the proposal. If they can’t understand it, chances are the grantor will have trouble as well.
    Review for simple spelling and grammatical errors.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Grant Writing Tips Brendan Wylie-Toal Grant Officer, Greenbelt Fund (519) 722-5245 bwylie-toal@greenbeltfund.ca
    • 2. 2
    • 3. 3 • Stage 1: Scoping • Stage 2: Writing • Stage 3: Reviewing Three Stages of Grant Writing
    • 4. 4 • Know your funder – What are their priorities? – What language do they use? – Does your application align with their mission and mandate? • Make sure the project fits the priorities of the granting program • Call the funder to discuss your idea Stage 1: Scoping
    • 5. 5 • Have a well scoped out/thought out work plan – Demonstrate how you will get from A to B – Understand how the grant will be assessed. If certain metrics will be used, make sure you have thought out how you will measure these outcomes. – Understand difference between Goals, Activities, and Results/Outcomes Stage 1: Scoping
    • 6. Start Develop Green Retail Services Develop App Project End App Green Retail Services Develop Business Models App Factory 4 Retail locations Stakehold er feedback Green Mystery Shopping Retailer scorecard Training Services Piloting/r esearch Example
    • 7. 7 • Make sure you have the proper partners and/or letters of support • Make sure your budget is detailed – Any line items in the budget should be mentioned in the proposal. – Ex: if you’re asking for a consultant or equipment, make sure the need for that item is described in the application. Stage 1: Scoping
    • 8. 8 • Make sure you cover the Why, How, and What. – Applicants tend to be good at describing either the why, or the how and what of their projects. But the great applications do all three. • Use clear language. • Be concise Stage 2: Writing
    • 9. 9 • Try to assess the risks and shortcomings of your proposal. Be ready to answer follow-up questions. • Review, review, review Stage 3: Review

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