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Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation
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Task Force On Sustainable Lifestyles Presentation

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Lifestyles are part of our identity; people express their social position, political preferences and psychological aspirations to others through them. Lifestyles define and differentiate us. They are …

Lifestyles are part of our identity; people express their social position, political preferences and psychological aspirations to others through them. Lifestyles define and differentiate us. They are the way we live our lives.

Lifestyles are shaped by a whole host of factors. Their roots are in culture, politics, economics and social norms. For sustainable lifestyles to enter our cultures and societies, to become part of our everyday life, they must be developed at all levels. They need to be enabled and encouraged by the social and technical systems and institutions that surround us. People will only swap their car for public transport if there’s an efficient and cost-effective public transport system.

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  • The measure of GDP has been used as a measure for progress. Research now shows that increasing GDP does not deliver happier and more satisfied lifestyles.15 So surely it is not, in actual fact, progress. There is a positive correlation between wealth and happiness, but only up to a point. According to the New Economics Foundation’s 2009 Happy Planet Index, the UK ranks as only the 108th happiest country, Sweden the 119th and the US the 150th happiest. Unexpectedly perhaps, Costa Rica, Vietnam and the Philippines are amongst the 20 happiest countries in the world.
  • The international Task Force on Sustainable Lifestyles was led by Sweden between 2005 and 2009 with members from governments, NGO’s, business, universities and research institutes, from developed and developing countries
  • This Manifesto sets out the top-line recommendations from the Task Force to deliver more sustainable lifestyles. It is based on the lessons we’ve learned from our experience so far and demonstrates how we are looking forward to a better, more sustainable future. Enthuse and inspire. Convey what sustainable lifestyles are about and how great it is to live them. The changes don’t require drastic personal sacrifices or huge expense, nor do they hinder individual freedoms or compromise national development. They create healthier, better connected, more stable communities and environments. It has got to be a positive message. It has got to be about what we gain, not what we give up. Create support structures. Behavior change is only effective if people are provided with the means through which they can make sustainable choices. This could be in the form of innovative products and services or infrastructure improvements, such as cycle lanes, educating people on sustainability, or an online network to share experiences. Enabling change is just as important as encouraging it. Celebrate success. All over the world amazing work is happening to help us live more sustainable lives. So much is already happening and it deserves celebrating. Rejoicing in the successes will encourage other individuals and communities to get involved. There is still so much more that remains to be done by individuals, communities and business. Focus your efforts. The work done by the Task Force over the last four years has covered a wide range of areas. With a solid foundation of understanding, focused work is needed to create much needed lifestyle changes. Form partnerships. People are diverse and complicated, lifestyles even more so. It takes a lot of time and effort to build the required relationships and expertise to make sustainable lifestyles happen. Connecting people and organizations, each with different expertise, skills and relationships, can deliver results far above the sum of their parts.
  • Today we have a choice. To create places, policies and practices that improve the quality of life for all. To encourage interactions and conversations that educate and enrich lives. And we can do all this in a way that meets the global challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss, and the recent financial crisis, all of which increase social tensions and resource shortages. We can work towards encouraging and creating sustainable lifestyles. Or we can continue on with business as usual, and all that will bring. We only have one planet Earth. 6.5 billion people live on it. Every single one of them using the Earth’s resources. Our lifestyles have evolved over time to a point where, collectively, we are living beyond our means. We are using resources 30% faster than our one planet can cope with. If we carry on at this rate, by 2050, we will need two planets to maintain us. The problem is we don’t have two planets. We only have one. It is clear that all lifestyles are not equal. Some live luxurious, rich, plentiful lives. Others are struggling to provide the basic human needs of food, heat, shelter and safety for themselves and their families. Such inequality causes social problems, like conflict, crime, health, and unhappiness. It must therefore be recognized that it is not only finite resources that are a sustainability challenge, but social issues too. References, Clockwise from left: WBCSD (2008) Sustainable Consumption Facts and Trends: From a business perspective EEA (2005) Household consumption and the environment. Copenhagen, European Environmental Agency: 72. Stern N (2006) The Stern Review on The Economics of Climate Change Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat (2008) World Population Prospects. WWF (2006) Living Planet Report UN (2006) The 2nd UN World Water Development Report: ‘Water, a shared responsibility’. Paris, UNESCO: 601.
  • In 2002, participants at the World Summit on Sustainable Development called for the international community to accelerate the shift towards sustainable consumption and production (SCP). The Johannesburg Plan of Implementation that came out of the Summit encourages and promotes the development of a 10 Year Framework of Programmes (10YFP) to support regional and national initiatives to accelerate this shift. A range of stakeholders gathered in Marrakech in 2003 to generate support for SCP and the development of the 10YFP. They launched the Marrakech Process which set off a series of consultations, forums, dialogues, partnership projects and Task Forces. Since 2005, seven international Task Forces have been launched on specific SCP themes in order to encourage action, support SCP implementation and provide inputs into the 10YFP. One of these is the international Marrakech Task Force on Sustainable Lifestyles, led by the Swedish Ministry of the Environment.
  • The nine Marrakech Task Force projects cover activities in 43 countries across every region of the world. They have produced materials in 11 different languages, adapted to local cultures and conditions. Sustainable lifestyles cannot be achieved by shortterm and voluntary initiatives alone. Powerful policy tools are required. For governments to implement these, evidence is needed. The nine Task Force projects provide this evidence base. The projects have tested ideas and collected stories from across the world on sustainable living. From delivering training sessions in African universities to running youth engagement projects in the Philippines, all the projects have contributed to a greater understanding of what sustainable lifestyles are and how they can be created. The Task Force has asked, and tried to answer, some difficult questions: How can a social movement towards sustainable lifestyles be stimulated through top down and bottom up approaches? • How can awareness and social involvement be stimulated at local levels? • How can the media and ICT be useful tools? • How does recognizing a person’s many roles - parent, community member, consumer etc – help in achieving sustainability? • What is the best way to educate people about the impact of their lifestyle and to encourage more sustainable behaviors?
  • Lifestyles are part of our identity; people express their social position, political preferences and psychological aspirations to others through them. Lifestyles define and differentiate us. They are the way we live our lives. Lifestyles are shaped by a whole host of factors. Their roots are in culture, politics, economics and social norms. For sustainable lifestyles to enter our cultures and societies, to become part of our everyday life, they must be developed at all levels. They need to be enabled and encouraged by the social and technical systems and institutions that surround us. People will only swap their car for public transport if there’s an efficient and cost-effective public transport system. But, social interactions also encourage sustainable living. These interactions are called ‘social capital’ and have as much influence on a society’s productivity as ‘physical capital’ (the tools that help you do a job) and ‘human capital’ (a person’s skills and ability). For the Taskforce, sustainable lifestyles means rethinking our ways of living, how we buy and how we organize our everyday life. It is also about altering how we socialize, exchange, share, educate and build identities. It means transforming our societies and living in harmony with our natural environment.
  • As citizens, at home and at work, many of our choices – on energy use, transport, food, waste, communication and solidarity – contribute towards building sustainable lifestyles. Every sector of society has something to contribute. This definition of sustainable lifestyles is not fixed. The economic and environmental challenges facing the world lead to debate about the best way forward. Beyond environmental and development policy, adoption of sustainable approaches by business leaders and entrepreneurs constantly alters the way in which sustainable lifestyles are expressed. It is important that these changes are encouraged and listened to.
  • The impact of the goods we consume is best viewed through a lifecycle lens. Every stage of a product’s life has an environmental impact - from the extraction of raw materials to the manufacturing, transportation, eventual consumption and disposal. Sustainable production seeks to minimize the environmental impact at all times - from reducing the water use in production to designing a product for responsible disposal at the end of its life. Companies must analyze the lifecycle of each product. Governments can encourage them to do this through various policy instruments. The European Community’s Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive forces producers to consider disposal in the design and manufacture of their products. This policy has cut the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, and encouraged companies to offer services for the collection and disposal of their products. Lifecycle considerations also save businesses money. Those that consider every stage of the product’s lifecycle, from the beginning to end, can design their value chains with savings in mind: cutting waste, maximizing efficiency and capturing more value. Gains are being made in production. Goods are being produced more efficiently with less pollution.
  • The business sector possesses unique skill sets and resources to incentivize the move towards more sustainable lifestyles. But this needs to be driven further. Networks like the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, which includes the 200 largest companies in the world, are supporting this drive. However, more businesses need to be brought on board. The business case for sustainable lifestyles needs selling alongside the wider demonstration of best practice. The market for more sustainable products is growing. The number of people considering sustainability while shopping has been rising over the years. With markets in developed countries becoming increasingly competitive, there are also great opportunities for business engagement at the ‘bottom of the pyramid’. Companies with more inclusive business models are seizing these opportunities with locally developed and adapted products. There are many strategies businesses can adopt. The Task Force project Making the Business Case for Sustainable Lifestyles produced seven guidebooks for businesses’ response to the challenges of sustainable lifestyles. These booklets show how applying sustainable principles in the development and design of products and services can build successful innovation and a solid customer base. The booklets are available at: www.encourage-sustainable-lifestyles.net
  • Through the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles, the Task Force conducted one of the largest surveys ever run on people’s attitudes to sustainable lifestyles. The project tested a series of future scenarios to see what people found most attractive. The respondents also shared what they know about sustainability, design and their aspirations for the future. By understanding what people care about and consider important, policy makers and program managers will be able to design popular responses to the challenge of sustainability.
  • Social innovation is characterized by new strategies, concepts, projects and organizations that meet social needs in the context of sustainable development. The Task Force found great examples of community level innovation that improve people’s lifestyles. However, surprisingly few people know about them. The move towards sustainable lifestyles has been a quietly developing, but global movement that is slowly moving towards more mainstream channels. As a recently launched website, www.ideasforchange.tv, argues: “Many of us – from individuals to politicians, entrepreneurs and organizations – have ideas about what could be done; suggestions that could lead the way forward. But we don’t meet, we don’t interact, we don’t synergize.” A number of Task Force projects were successful in stimulating and connecting movements of people. Creating these connections allowed people to see others who were sharing similar experiences and had also decided to change their behavior. Creative Communities for Sustainable Lifestyles collected and shared promising cases of sustainable ways of living across the globe. See http://www.sustainable-everyday.net for inspiring scenarios. UNEP/UNESCO YouthXchange Program, uses and connects local NGOs in 22 countries, and nurtures a youth movement across regions, supported by the Task Force on Sustainable Lifestyles: www.youthxchange.net
  • To successfully engage people in sustainable lifestyles, you need to… Know what you want to achieve... Which of your sustainable lifestyle objectives are you aiming to meet? Understanding how you are going to create the desired change will make projects more effective. Build an exciting vision… People will be more inclined to work towards a sustainable lifestyle if they have an exciting and desirable image to aspire to. Understand who you are engaging… Understanding people is the first step to engaging them. It is vital that what you are offering is relevant to people’s needs and motivations. Know how to influence them… Once you know what you want to achieve, what success looks like, and who you are trying to reach, you then need to plan how to influence them. Know how to reach them… Identifying the best ways and places to engage people going about their busy lives is crucial. Getting people to change is complicated. Human behavior is extremely complicated. People are able to believe and value one thing, while behaving in a contradictory way. Consider the smoker who values being healthy, may eat well and exercise, but still smokes. This is called the value-action gap. Overcoming this gap needs more than information and raising awareness. People need to be engaged, enabled and encouraged to change their behavior through communications, education, capacity building and infrastructure development. A number of the Task Force projects aimed to remove barriers to action. The Toolkit for Advertizing and Marketing Courses, (http://www.unep.fr/shared/publications/cdrom/DTIx0886xPA/) recognized that lecturers, marketers and students lacked the resources and understanding to effectively engage with sustainable lifestyles. The toolkit enabled courses to provide this teaching. Creative Communities for Sustainable Lifestyles found that there are plenty of social resources and set out to show people that progress is happening everywhere. From The Playground Café in Paris to an Eco-Hamlet in Poland all the Creative Communities examples encouraged people to participate in more sustainable lifestyles.
  • The Task Force for Sustainable Lifestyles finished at the end of 2009. The results, findings, insights and learnings have been evaluated and are being communicated to key stakeholders in order to affect greater change. The findings, ongoing and off-shoot projects of the Task Force will be continued under the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL). PERL is a partnership of researchers, experts, educators and practitioners who will contribute to the Marrakech Process on Sustainable Consumption and Production, and the UN Decade for Education for Sustainable Development. Supported by the Swedish and Norwegian Governments, the European Union, UNEP and other donors, PERL will drive sustainable lifestyles forward through six working groups: • Reflection and implementation • Enabling sustainable lifestyles • Social innovation • Education for responsible living • International dialogue • Communications and media Governments will soon negotiate the 10-Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production. The Task Force has developed specific recommendations based on its experience and will seek to influence stakeholders within the Marrakech process. The recommendations are based on the Task Force’s projects and experience.
  • Transcript

    • 1. TASK FORCE ON SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES
    • 2. YURI MECHITOV / WORLD BANK MANIFESTO CHALLENGE THE MARRAKECH PROCESS TASK FORCE’S WORK IN BRIEF DEFINITION PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION BUSINESS CASE PEOPLE’S ATTITUDES SOCIAL INNOVATION ENGAGING PEOPLE TASKFORCE PROJECTS WHERE NEXT? 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 CONTENTS
    • 3. RAY WITLIN / WORLD BANK
    • 4. <ul><li>“ Sustainable lifestyles require a strong shift in behaviors and collaboration between individuals and communities. They also involve the development of alternative infrastructures, concrete workable solutions, respectful of socio-cultural realities, and efficient messages to support them. </li></ul><ul><li>While some work is underway, much more is needed. Networks between innovative groups of people in different places and countries must be encouraged. </li></ul><ul><li>More cooperation and action is needed to demonstrate the benefits of sustainable lifestyles, explore new perspectives and development paths, motivate policymakers, civil society organizations, scientists, the business sector and individuals to take part.” </li></ul><ul><li>Ms Elisabet Falemo </li></ul><ul><li>State Secretary, Swedish Ministry of the Environment </li></ul>
    • 5. Enthuse and inspire Give a positive message about what we gain not what we give up). It’s all about creating healthier, better connected and more stable communities and environments Create support structures Provide the products, means and the infrastructure to make sustainable choices Celebrate success So much is already happening. Rejoice in success to encourage the involvement of individuals and communities Focus your efforts Choose one specific area where lifestyle change is needed Form partnerships Connect people, build relationships and expertise to make sustainable lifestyles happen. JULIO PANTIOJA / WORLD BANK 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
    • 6. CHALLENGE The number of earths that would be required were everyone to adopt the consumption patterns and lifestyles of the average citizen in North America The potential cost of climate change if we don’t invest to tackle it OF GLOBAL GDP The reduction in the amount the average African household consumes over the last 25 years The proportion of the Earth’s ecosystems services that have been degraded in the past 50 years The global consumer class; nearly half come from developing economies BILLION The expected growth in the world’s population between now and 2050 NOW
    • 7. THE MARRAKECH PROCESS SCOTT WALLACE / WORLD BANK CO-OPERATION WITH AFRICA EDUCATION FOR SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION SUSTAINABLE TOURISM SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES SUSTAINABLE BUILDINGS & CONSTRUCTION SUSTAINABLE PUBLIC PROCUREMENT SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS SWEDISH MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT PROJECTS LITERATURE REVIEW GLOBAL SURVEY CREATIVE COMMUNITIES MAKING THE BUSINESS CASE AFRICAN UNIVERSITIES COMMUNICATING SUSTAINABILITY INTER CULTURAL SISTER CLASSROOMS YOUTHXCHANGE TOOLKIT FOR MARKETING & ADVERTISING TASK FORCES REGIONAL PROGRAMMES & STRATEGIES COOPERATIVE DIALOGUE NGO FORUM BUSINESS FORUM UN INTER-AGENCY NETWORK MARRAKECH PROCESS THE JOHANNESBURG PLAN OF IMPLEMENTATION ON SCP
    • 8. <ul><li>Global </li></ul><ul><li>9 projects, 43 countries across the globe, 11 languages </li></ul><ul><li>Tested ideas & collected stories </li></ul><ul><li>Provide policy makers, civil society, and business with powerful evidence base, tools and good examples </li></ul><ul><li>Connected people </li></ul><ul><li>Brought sustainable lifestyles practitioners together </li></ul>THE TASK FORCE’S WORK IN BRIEF GENNADIY RATASHUNKO / WORLD BANK
    • 9. <ul><li>Why focus on sustainable lifestyles? Our lifestyle choices play a key role in climate change, biodiversity loss and inequality. The costs of inaction are staggering. </li></ul><ul><li>What are sustainable lifestyles? Sustainable lifestyles means rethinking our ways of living, how we buy and how we organize our everyday life. It is also about altering how we socialize, exchange, share, educate and build identities. It means transforming our societies and living in harmony with our natural environment. </li></ul>SUSTAINABLE LIFESTYLES DEFINITION
    • 10. PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION <ul><li>Sustainable lifestyles are complex Lifestyles are shaped by a whole host of factors (culture, politics, economics, social norms). Sustainable lifestyles need to be enabled and encouraged by the social and technical systems and institutions that surround us. Every sector of society has something to contribute. </li></ul><ul><li>We need sustainable consumption as well as sustainable production Every stage of a product’s life has an environmental impact - from the extraction of raw materials to the manufacturing, transportation, final consumption and disposal . </li></ul>THOMAS SENNETT / WORLD BANK
    • 11. PRODUCT LIFECYCLE <ul><li>Companies should analyze their products’ lifecycles: </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce environmental impact </li></ul><ul><li>Increase efficiency and save money </li></ul><ul><li>Increase environmental credentials and brand value </li></ul>THOMAS SENNETT / WORLD BANK PARTS PRODUCTION CAR MANUFACTURE CAR USE CAR DISPOSAL RAW MATERIAL PRODUCTION
    • 12. <ul><li>OUR POLITICAL LEADERS AREN’T THE ONLY ONES WHO’VE BEEN HANDED A MANDATE FOR CHANGE. LEADERS OF BUSINESSES AND INSTITUTIONS EVERYWHERE CONFRONT A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO TRANSFORM THE WAY THE WORLD WORKS </li></ul><ul><li>SAMUEL J. PALMISANO, </li></ul><ul><li>PRESIDENT & CEO OF IBM CORPORATION </li></ul>BUSINESS CANNOT SUCCEED IN A SOCIETY THAT FAILS BJ Ӧ RN STIGSON, WBCSD PRESIDENT BUSINESS CASE Primary sustainable consumption opportunities for businesses (Source: CSCP) Opportunities for producers and retailers What we sell What we communicate How we take care What I buy How I use How I discard Consumers’ choice Better quality choices & high value products Raise awareness on low carbon & resource efficient product use After sales and end-of-life services
    • 13. <ul><li>UNDERSTANDING (MAINSTREAM) CONSUMER BEHAVIOR </li></ul><ul><li>IS A PRE-REQUISITE FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW TO MOTIVATE </li></ul><ul><li>OR ENCOURAGE PRO-ENVIRONMENTAL BEHAVIOR TIM JACKSON, 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>The Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles found that in the countries surveyed: </li></ul><ul><li>Young people are most concerned about poverty and the environment </li></ul><ul><li>Young people value quality of life and empowerment </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure changes are needed </li></ul><ul><li>There is a desire for sustainable development. We have the opportunity to harness it. </li></ul>PEOPLE’S ATTITUDES
    • 14. <ul><li>MANY OF US – FROM INDIVIDUALS </li></ul><ul><li>TO POLITICIANS, ENTREPRENEURS </li></ul><ul><li>AND ORGANIZATIONS – HAVE IDEAS ABOUT WHAT COULD BE DONE; SUGGESTIONS THAT COULD LEAD </li></ul><ul><li>THE WAY FORWARD. BUT WE DON’T MEET, WE DON’T INTERACT, WE DON’T SYNERGIZE </li></ul><ul><li>WWW.IDEASFORCHANGE.TV </li></ul>SOCIAL INNOVATION
    • 15. <ul><li>Know what you want to achieve… </li></ul><ul><li>Build an exciting vision… </li></ul><ul><li>Understand who you’re engaging… </li></ul><ul><li>Know how to influence them… </li></ul><ul><li>Know how to reach them… </li></ul>ENGAGING PEOPLE ARBRON / FLICKR ENGAGE Reach out and connect with people to encourage sustainable lifestyles ENCOURAGE Celebrate the success of those leading the way with projects and products ENCOURAGE Encourage through positive approaches, legislation and behavior change ENABLE Provide necessary education, skills, policies and infrastructure
    • 16. <ul><li>Literature Review on Sustainable Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>Intercultural Sister Classrooms </li></ul><ul><li>YouthXchange </li></ul><ul><li>Toolkit for Advertizing and Marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Communicating Sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Making the Business Case for Sustainable Lifestyles </li></ul><ul><li>Introducing Sustainable Lifestyles into African Universities and Colleges </li></ul>
    • 17. Literature Review on Sustainable Lifestyles <ul><li>The project pulls together evidence surrounding sustainable lifestyles, including the tools and methods available to tackle the issue, understanding why we behave the way we do. </li></ul><ul><li>It intends to give a concise insight into the research </li></ul><ul><li>and to identify key evidence gaps and recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>for future research. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Policy makers, experts and NGOs </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of accounting methods </li></ul><ul><li>Standard of living definition </li></ul><ul><li>Attitudes and behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Action for behavior change </li></ul><ul><li>Role of production for sustainable lifestyles </li></ul>DOMINIC SANSONI / WORLD BANK
    • 18. Intercultural Sister Classrooms <ul><li>The project is an educational pilot project which raises awareness of lifecycle analysis, engaging teachers and students across America in new ways of learning and acting. Lifecycle analysis </li></ul><ul><li>in purchasing and production decisions is an important skill </li></ul><ul><li>for current and future generations of school leavers. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Ministries of Education and educators </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>Pilot project of a new international participatory education process (USA, Brazil, Costa Rica and Mexico) </li></ul><ul><li>Materials available in English, Spanish and Portuguese </li></ul><ul><li>Government support, new projects and partnerships </li></ul>
    • 19. UNEP/UNESCO YouthXchange program <ul><li>Using a combination of printed guidebooks, media </li></ul><ul><li>and educational outreach, the YouthXchange program engages young people on issues of sustainable consumption. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Civil society working with youth, Ministries of Education and Environment and educators </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>Implemented in Latin America, Caribbean, West Asia, United Arab Emirates, Philippines and northern African territories </li></ul><ul><li>Innovative channels and networks </li></ul><ul><li>Further partnerships on the way </li></ul>
    • 20. Toolkit for Advertizing and Marketing Courses <ul><li>The Toolkit is a flexible and interactive resource for the educators training future marketing, advertizing and communications professionals to engage them with sustainable issues in a business context. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Business teachers and students </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: The toolkit has four modules – </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Development: ethics and social practices </li></ul><ul><li>The economic and social context for sustainability communications </li></ul><ul><li>The practice of sustainability communications: from innovation to risk </li></ul><ul><li>Practices and exercises in marketing and communications </li></ul>SHINYTHINGS / FLICKR
    • 21. Communicating Sustainability <ul><li>By identifying principles and best practice for running effective public campaigns on sustainability, this project developed a foundation for outreach across a wide range </li></ul><ul><li>of audiences. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Anyone communicating sustainability issues </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>Step-by-step guide and organization of highly interactive training sessions </li></ul><ul><li>Material translated into French and Spanish and downloaded over 700,000 times </li></ul>
    • 22. Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles <ul><li>The Global Survey asks young adults (18-35 years old) from 20 countries, living in urban areas, to examine their current lifestyles. It provides feedback on perceptions and reactions to visions of sustainable lifestyles. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Experts, policy makers, NGOs, business, researchers and communicators </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>Survey findings highlighting: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>concerns on poverty and the environment, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>desire for quality of life, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>need for infrastructure changes, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>significant demand for sustainable lifestyles </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Questionnaire translated into 10 languages </li></ul>
    • 23. Creative Communities Creative Communities is an ongoing research project that identifies best practice and makes policy recommendations on grass root social innovations for sustainable urban living and on how to make your daily life more sustainable. It focuses on rapidly developing countries, particularly Brazil, India, China, and Africa. Useful for: Community project leaders, designers and local government Outcomes: 8 common areas of community led projects:
    • 24. Making the Business Case for Sustainable Lifestyles A series of guidebooks addressing business on opportunities of sustainable production and consumption and on how to promote sustainable lifestyles. Useful for: Business audiences with an interest in sustainable lifestyles Outcomes: Seven guidebooks
    • 25. Introducing Sustainable Lifestyles into African Universities and Colleges <ul><li>Universities in Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique </li></ul><ul><li>and Mauritius are combining sustainable lifestyle education </li></ul><ul><li>with business development skills to promote successful, sustainable entrepreneurship. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful for: Educators, young entrepreneurs, government and environmentalists </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes: </li></ul><ul><li>10 universities in 5 African universities </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive toolkits, presentations, imagery, audio visuals </li></ul>
    • 26. <ul><li>Findings, ongoing and off-shoot projects of the Task Force will continue under the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL) </li></ul><ul><li>Development of recommendations for the10 Year Framework Programme on SCP focusing on 5 specific areas: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Governance and enabling framework </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing oriented actions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Education/training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Everyday enabling actions </li></ul></ul></ul>WHERE NEXT? ERIC MILLER / WORLD BANK
    • 27. THANK YOU For more information see: www.unep.fr/scp/marrakech/taskforces/lifestyles.htm

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