21 Steps to 21st Century Learning
Strategic Planning for Technology-rich Learning
Durant Online Institute-Week Four
Bruce ...
..a critical conversation..
Imagine the your Experience as a teacher at in
the Technology-rich learning environment that w...
Student Laptop Initiative
Expectations-Students
Knowledge
- Solve problems in their world and with others outside their wo...
Innovative,
creative
Knowledge
workers
Future
 Collaborative
Leaners
 Self-directed
 Supports mobile
lifestyle
 Data-d...
www.shoutlearning.org
Shout Project Methodology
Step 1:
Project
Definition
Students choose a
global problem
Step 3:
Collaborating on
Solutions
S...
Step 4: Launch Local Action
• Additional details and examples can be found at
http://collab.tiged.org/deforestaction.
The Deforestaction Global Project
Flowchart
• Purpose:
To demonstrate an effective
model for halting the destruction
of im...
Step 6: External Contribution
To achieve a successful outcome, students, teachers and facilitators have been forming partn...
Setting the Guidelines: Policy
Development
1313
Building a Policy Framework for Success..
• Policies for effective implementation
• Taking care of the detail to deve...
Setting the Guidelines: Policy
Development…
 Devices left at home – spare devices, penalties
 Backup / Data storage – di...
Setting the Guidelines: Policy
Development…
 Insurance - Mandatory v optional / School v home
 Parental training? Mandat...
Setting the Guidelines: Policy
Development…
 Battery charging student / parent responsibility, swap
out batteries, penalt...
FAQ: Understanding the Issues and
Listening
Questions you should have answers to…
• What about handwriting? Won’t my child’s handwriting suffer
from using a keyboard ...
Questions you should have answers to…
• Will this laptop be able to play movies when we’re on holidays?
Is it OK if we tak...
Issues around Notebook Use in Class
Handwriting and Exams
“If my son is taught keyboarding, his
handwriting will deteriora...
Spelling
“Of course spellcheckers
allow my son to cheat”
“My son has become a lazy
speller because of his spell-
check”
“S...
“My goal in life is to find ways in which children can
use technology as a constructive medium to do
things that they coul...
Discussion: How can rethink the classroom
experience for our students so they can share
and build knowledge together?
10 Things they don’t tell you about
1 to 1!
1. Despite all protestations, most people still focus on the
technology, because it’s the easiest thing to focus on.
2. 1 ...
54
www.aalf.org
bdixon@aalf.org
Aalf 21 steps week four durant
Aalf 21 steps week four durant
Aalf 21 steps week four durant
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AALF's 21 Steps to 21st Century Learning Institute's Session 4, specially designed for Durant ISD, OK.

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Aalf 21 steps week four durant

  1. 1. 21 Steps to 21st Century Learning Strategic Planning for Technology-rich Learning Durant Online Institute-Week Four Bruce Dixon Co-founder, Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation Director, ideasLAB
  2. 2. ..a critical conversation.. Imagine the your Experience as a teacher at in the Technology-rich learning environment that will be your school, THREE years from now. What skills will you require to provide the best for your students? …Which of those do you think should be the focus of your Professional Learning over the next 12 months? bdixon@aalf.org
  3. 3. Student Laptop Initiative Expectations-Students Knowledge - Solve problems in their world and with others outside their world - Identify the problem, find the information,synthesize it, and solve it - Articulate this learning - Create new knowledge Skills - Solve problems in daily work and activities - Possess the basic skills of information literacy - Transfer learning to new technologies - Communicate using technology Aspirations - Understand the relevancy of high school to future success - Develop higher aspirations than when they started their schooling - Possess a “can do” attitude - Establish his/her own vision for a productive future Behavior - Participate in learning activities to apply knowledge and skills - Participate in project or problem-based learningexperiences as a requirement for graduation
  4. 4. Innovative, creative Knowledge workers Future  Collaborative Leaners  Self-directed  Supports mobile lifestyle  Data-driven decision making  Highly personalised Long-term Economic Growth and Prosperity Increasing Digital Literacy Improving Teacher Digital Competencies Core  Empowering teachers and learners  Personalisation  Universal Access Addressing Fundamental Issues of Equity Realigning Educational Outcomes to meet needs of 21st century Emerging  Collective Knowledge Constructors  Innovative thinkers, active problems solvers  Increased pedagogical capacity  Collaborative, self- directed learners Improved, relevant Educational Outcomes TransfornationtoContemporaryEducationSystem Empoweringleanersandteachers The real story behind Universal Access…. …it’s every child’s right.
  5. 5. www.shoutlearning.org
  6. 6. Shout Project Methodology Step 1: Project Definition Students choose a global problem Step 3: Collaborating on Solutions Students collaborate on solutions and agree on a global action based project Step 2: Online Workspaces Student spaces / communities are established. Teacher resources and guides are created and posted Step 4: Agree on Local Actions Students propose and agree on local actions which will support the global project. Step 5: Launch Global Project The global project is launched. Students collaborate using all appropriate channels to recruit new students Step 6: External Contribution Students seek the support of industry experts, interested parties, sponsors etc. to assist. Step 7: Create Lasting Change With the support of teachers, partners and others, students achieve their objective and create lasting positive change. Figure 1: The Shout Project Process
  7. 7. Step 4: Launch Local Action • Additional details and examples can be found at http://collab.tiged.org/deforestaction.
  8. 8. The Deforestaction Global Project Flowchart • Purpose: To demonstrate an effective model for halting the destruction of important rainforests, commencing in Borneo. To create the world’s largest Orang- utan sanctuary. To raise awareness of the need for cessation of deforestation in general. Figure 2: DeforestAction Global Project School-based initiatives School based projects will include either a fund-raising or awareness raising component. Curriculum resources, lesson ideas etc, will be shared through the Partners in Learning Network Viral Initiatives Students and partners will promote the global project using social networking and other web 2.0 tools Partners Partners will provide students with support, advice, new channels and endorsements. Partners may also provide curriculum content / resources where appropriate. Other Channels Other channels will drive traffic to the DeforestAction website (including The Burning Season movie) and other partner initiatives students can create. All traffic to the DeforestAction website will be directed to the Tree-safe call to action first. Funds Management Students researched a number of Non- Government Organizations to select the most suitable partner to achieve the goal. Rainforest Rescue (charity) will be the recipients of raised funds. Rainforest Preservation Funds will be exchanged for land in a designated area in Borneo. Land will be zoned ‘Conservation’ and all forested land will be assigned a carbon value. This value will be sold by Carbon Conservation as carbon off-set credits to big polluters. Funds raised will be used to employ locals as ‘guardians of the forests’. Documentation The global project will be documented in 3D and become part of a major motion picture. See Appendix 2.
  9. 9. Step 6: External Contribution To achieve a successful outcome, students, teachers and facilitators have been forming partnerships with external entities. These include Virgo Productions, Smithsonian Institute, Cool Earth, Rainforest Rescue, Carbon Conservation and many others. Selection of partners has been overseen by TakingITGLobal to ensure partners meet the highest levels of integrity. Example 1: The Burning Season is a multi-award winning motion picture narrated by Hugh Jackman. This movie opens in cinemas later in 2010 in the US. The call to action URL at the end of this movie www.tenthingsyoucando.com will direct viewers to the DeforestAction website, driving potentially millions of new partners to the project. A range of curriculum materials, learning resources etc, will be provided for use by DeforestAction schools (hosted in PILN). It has been proposed the movie be re- cut to 30 minutes to create a student version. There is also a proposal to produce a big budget Hollywood motion picture in 3D documenting the DeforestAction project. This will be directed by Cathy Henkel.. The script is currently being written with idea input from the DeforestAction team.
  10. 10. Setting the Guidelines: Policy Development
  11. 11. 1313 Building a Policy Framework for Success.. • Policies for effective implementation • Taking care of the detail to develop fidelity of implementation • Ensuring all parties are kept informed • Addressing change management issues • Policies that ensure equity and scalability • Build digital and learning equity • Allowing all students to participate • Policies that build sustainability across all dimensions • Focus on addressing effective classroom practice • What really matters, and what’s worth doingGuiding Principles to ensure success.
  12. 12. Setting the Guidelines: Policy Development…  Devices left at home – spare devices, penalties  Backup / Data storage – division of responsibility, home v school, (CD, DVD, Server, other)  Virus protection / removal (cost of re-imaging)  Storage – mandatory v optional secure storage  Allocation of storage to students v grade level / subject selection  School based service / support (cost, level of support, supplier agreements)  Transport – responsibility between home & school  Printing credits - school supplied v student purchase  Device model flexibility – single unit v limited range options  Service / Support policies, pricing, guidelines  School bags – mandatory v optional (durable hard case alternatives)
  13. 13. Setting the Guidelines: Policy Development…  Insurance - Mandatory v optional / School v home  Parental training? Mandatory v optional  Internet / network policy (in line with existing EQ policy) Home v School  Data limit for downloading v purchasing more credit  Email (MIS v Yahoo v Hotmail etc)  Reporting lost / stolen laptops  Chat & Web 2.0 – allowed v restricted v banned  Electronic Games/Mp3 music files  Personal software policy  Devices left at home – spare devices, penalties
  14. 14. Setting the Guidelines: Policy Development…  Battery charging student / parent responsibility, swap out batteries, penalties  Backup / Data storage – division of responsibility, home v school, (CD, DVD, Server, other)  Virus protection / removal (cost of re-imaging)  Storage – mandatory v optional secure storage  Allocation of storage to students v grade level / subject selection  School based service / support (cost, level of support, supplier agreements)  Transport – responsibility between home & school  Printing credits - school supplied v student purchase  Device model flexibility – single unit v limited range options  Service / Support policies, pricing, guidelines  School bags – mandatory v optional
  15. 15. FAQ: Understanding the Issues and Listening
  16. 16. Questions you should have answers to… • What about handwriting? Won’t my child’s handwriting suffer from using a keyboard all day long? • Will my child be safe carrying an expensive laptop to school? • Aside from word processing and accessing data, what advantage is there in using computers for other areas of curriculum, such as mathematical analysis, science and history? • Won’t the students be able to cheat by using spell checker? What effect will that have on their spelling skills? • Don’t computers isolate kids? • Allocation of storage to students v grade level / subject selection • School based service / support (cost, level of support, supplier agreements) • What happens if I want my child to learn in the way I was taught? • Why did you choose PCs instead of Apple?
  17. 17. Questions you should have answers to… • Will this laptop be able to play movies when we’re on holidays? Is it OK if we take it with us to Fiji? • I would like my child to be involved in the program, but I can’t afford to make the monthly payments. Is there any support for parents in my position? • Can we personalize the computer? What about engraving my child’s name on it? • I just purchased a computer for home. Why should I buy another one now? • Aren’t there serious health risks with kids using computers? I heard wireless networks cause cancer..? • Will my child have to take the computer to school each day? My child already has a lot to carry for sport, music and other activities. • I was going to purchase a laptop for my child as a Christmas present. Can you give us the device before Christmas so my child can use it over the holiday period?
  18. 18. Issues around Notebook Use in Class Handwriting and Exams “If my son is taught keyboarding, his handwriting will deteriorate”” “”If my son uses his notebook too much, his handwriting will deteriorate” “ My son has to handwrite his Year 12 exams so he needs keep handwriting regularly otherwise he will get out of practice” “Until our students are allowed to take notebooks into exams, we will need to ensure that students can handwrite quickly and legibly”
  19. 19. Spelling “Of course spellcheckers allow my son to cheat” “My son has become a lazy speller because of his spell- check” “Spellcheckers harm my son’s spelling ability” Issues around Notebook Use in Class
  20. 20. “My goal in life is to find ways in which children can use technology as a constructive medium to do things that they could not do before; to do things at a level of complexity that was not previously accessible to children” Prof. Seymour Papert 1998
  21. 21. Discussion: How can rethink the classroom experience for our students so they can share and build knowledge together?
  22. 22. 10 Things they don’t tell you about 1 to 1!
  23. 23. 1. Despite all protestations, most people still focus on the technology, because it’s the easiest thing to focus on. 2. 1 to 1 is NOT about digitizing traditional learning. 3. Successful initiatives require ongoing and consistent focus and attention. 4. There is no Next Big Thing! 5. 1 to 1 is not a panacea for solving all of your learning problems. 6. Infrastructure costs, including demands on bandwidth, increase. 7. Most schools do NOT set the bar high enough. 8. 1 to 1 is only one very small step towards ongoing school reform. 9. 1 to 1 can be just a lot of technology, or it can open the door to a lot of learning…its entirely up to you. 10.We do this, not because it is easy….but because it is hard. 10 Things they don’t tell you about 1 to 1initiatives !
  24. 24. 54 www.aalf.org bdixon@aalf.org
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