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ASLA NSW:   an enabling adult the role of the teacher-librarian in creating a reading environment
 

ASLA NSW: an enabling adult the role of the teacher-librarian in creating a reading environment

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Explores Phd research on how we create a reading environment or culture in a secondary school.

Explores Phd research on how we create a reading environment or culture in a secondary school.

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ASLA NSW:   an enabling adult the role of the teacher-librarian in creating a reading environment ASLA NSW: an enabling adult the role of the teacher-librarian in creating a reading environment Presentation Transcript

  • ASLA NSW State Library Day An Enabling Adult: The role of the Teacher-librarian in creating a Reading Environment Susan La Marca February 2004
  • Children learn about literaturefrom what the adults aroundthem do about it. (Zahnleiter, 1985, p. 187)
  • The SELECTION Aidan Chambers The Reading (Book stock, availability, Environment: How adults help childrenReading accessibility, presentation) enjoy books. PETA, Thimble Press, 1991Circle ENABLING ADULT READING RESPONSE (Time to read. (“I want to enjoy Hearing it done. it again” Doing it for Formal talk. yourself.) Book gossip.)
  • AttitudeI have a book that I write down everything I read in.The kids ask for it they seem to like it. Ive started upa stand of good books to read and they know thatthat is a constant reference point for them for booksthat I have liked. School One – Teacher-librarian
  • AttitudeI think we have a role to play in promoting it andpromoting the idea that reading is, is something thatis worthwhile and why don’t we listen to one another,why don’t we talk. School Six – Teacher-librarian
  • AttitudeI was told by the then Head of Library that the girlswere all really good readers and that English lookedafter sort of the reading scheme stuff, and that thelibrary really was just for recreation, and that youreally had to do nothing to promote reading becausethe girls read. School Six – Teacher-librarian
  • AttitudeWe have to move down that technology road hereand ultimately I think reading will suffer. School Two - Library Technician
  • AttitudeI think it really comes back to what you think thefunction of a school library actually is. I do notbelieve that it is a primary function of a school libraryto provide extensive pleasure reading for kids. I thinkthat actually that function is taken up quite well bycommunity libraries. School Two – Vice Principal
  • AttitudeFrankly they didn’t read before and they don’t now.Well they do a bit. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • AttitudeWhat I am doing is what I am trying to do most of thetime. Information literacy is what I am on about.Promoting reading is for me a secondary thing. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • Relationships Teacher-librarians must work on building relationships as consciously as they work on building collections. (Hartzell, 1999).
  • Relationships - TeachersWell the relationships you have with teachers is verycrucial to whatever you do. So if I had to give priorityto any one thing that I do it would have to be mysupport for teachers and what they do. It could beliterature it could be research but I will work withthem. So that’s where my priority is because I findthat in the long run that pays the greatest dividend. School Six – Teacher-librarian
  • Relationships - TeachersI trust or know that she [the Teacher-librarian] hasgot training that I haven’t got – I respect and trustthat and I want her to be able to express that. ….I’mhappy to come with questions and bounce ideas offher. School One – Teacher
  • Relationships - Teachers…it (the library) can do its best to promote readingbut if the English department isn’t there then it’s alesser program, and it works the other way, I’m notsaying there wouldn’t be something but without theother but it would be a lesser program. School Six – Teacher
  • Relationships - StudentsGive the kids confidence, help them, talk to them andhelp. Shes really kind. Shell talk to you and ask youwhat you like. Thats important. School One - Student
  • Relationships - StudentsWe don’t really see the library staff much, we justpick up the book and they stamp it out. Maybe inyear seven you might see them more. School Six - Student
  • Access There is a great deal of evidence showing that children with more access to books read more. (Krashen, 2002, p 2)
  • AccessWe have a problem that things will get pinched orbits ripped out. If we’ve got the stuff that’s hotenough to read we have to lock it away and handle itcarefully. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • AccessWhat I am doing is what I am trying to do most of thetime. Information literacy is what I am on about.Promoting reading is for me a secondary thing. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • Advisory role of the TL The teacher-librarian has the specialised knowledge of reading material which classroom teachers may lack and can offer the guidance that teachers often do not. (Moloney, 2000, p. 102)
  • Advisory role of the TLShe can aim books at different students and tends toinformally discuss books with students. I think thatthat is important for another reason as well - itcreates that atmosphere, its got to be a comfortableplace. School One - Teacher
  • Advisory role of the TLWe don’t have a regular program of talking to theclasses, we don’t unless we are asked. Perhaps it’ssomething we should do, but perhaps with timeconstraints we would be biting off more than wecould chew. …We do wander over and talk to thekids when the classes are here.‘Do you talk to classes?’I don’t want to be seen as the one responsible. School Four – Teacher-librarian
  • Advisory role of the TLMatching the kid with the book. I would see that asthe best promotional thing that you can do. School Five – Teacher-librarian
  • Knowledge base of the TL Readers are made by readers. (Chambers, 1991, p. 87)
  • Knowledge base of the TLWhat Bernadette has been providing though, theboys are reading - because boys are asking her forbooks and she gets them in for them. She seems toknow what the boys like. School One - Library Assistant
  • Knowledge base of the TLShe (the teacher-librarian) knows more about thebooks than anyone else. I think the boys look up toher to give them advice. School One – Library Assistant
  • PolicyUm, you need vision, goals, long-term action plan, tounderstand responsibilities. In order to make anyprogram work. We have a problem here inthinking - throwing money is enough. School Three - Teacher
  • Collection management Adolescents, like the rest of us, read what is available. (Carter, 1987, p 187)
  • Content management.. in the past there has been a little bit of tensionbetween myself and the teacher-librarian about whatsort of texts should go on the shelves. School Five - Teacher
  • Library Reading Programs Books + teachers/teacher-librarian intervention = reading achievement. (Haycock, 2001)
  • Library Reading ProgramsReading classes are seen as the domain of theEnglish teacher working with a whole class forreading is not really seen as part of their role. Thereare introductory lectures about the use of technologybut that’s it. Guidance should come from theteachers, as teachers themselves are supposed to bethe readers. School Two - Teacher
  • Library Reading ProgramsThere is no structure, not all of the teachers use that(timetabled English period) some of them come anduse it for other things. I’m free as a staff member togo over and help them and recommend books, it isn’tpart of my job though as there is no time allocationso I don’t always do it. There is no time to develop aplan or strategy… School Two - Library Technician
  • Library Reading ProgramsClasses come regularly but we don’t do anything. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • Library Reading ProgramsReading classes are seen as the domain of theEnglish teacher working with a whole class forreading is not really seen as part of their role. Thereare introductory lectures about the use of technologybut that’s it. Guidance should come from theteachers, as teachers themselves are supposed to bethe readers. School Two - Teacher
  • Ambience Reading is not a duty, and has consequently no business to be made disagreeable. Augustine Birrell
  • Ambience ‘Provide the ambience and they will do it’ I don’tthink it would work here. I think. I haven’t tried. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • AmbienceSometimes I think a lot of librarians, it’s the oldfashioned thing, you know like Sir Humphrey - thebest libraries don’t have any students in them. School Six - Teacher
  • Ambience….it’s got to be an environment that’s exciting,interesting and challenging…So if she can breakdown the barriers, which she has done, I think it thenopens up so many more avenues for the students. School One – Vice Principal
  • Layout There is then some evidence to indicate that children also seek to define and defend a territory for themselves. (Doll, 1992, p 226)
  • Layout..there aren’t any areas for casual reading and that iswhat I don’t like, but we are required by the behaviorof the students to have the tables set up that way(evenly spaced rows), that is the only way. We havegot to have places where some boys can beseparated. School One – Teacher-librarian
  • LayoutThey have the reading area but that is too small,cramped, noisy. School Two - Teacher
  • LayoutWe don’t have that nice little lounge room bit – wecan’t put it in and the bit we have is disappearing aswe put more computers. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • DisplayI was told by previous staff that doing display waswasting my time. School One – Teacher-librarian
  • DisplayIt’s good to see your stuff on display. School Three - Student
  • DisplayWe are limited by time and uh, I suppose it comesfairly low on my priorities. I know that it would begood but some things you are not good at and wheretime is short you put the time where you think youwill get more of a result. School Three – Teacher-librarian
  • LayoutThey have the reading area but that is too small,cramped, noisy. School Two - Teacher
  • External Factors Schools are bureaucracies – and no one in a bureaucracy can be successful alone. (Hartzell, 1999)
  • External FactorsThe identified external factors are: Budget Staffing Support from School Administration Curriculum needs and demands Architectural Limitations
  • Professional Context/Debate There is no properly functioning individual whose mode of existence is not moderated or mediated (if not determined) by the social. (Misson, 1997, p 5)
  • Professional Context/DebateThe problem with library roles, as I see it. is that weare not really dropping any roles we are just addingto it. School Two – Teacher-librarian
  • Professional Context/DebateWell, um, I think we are torn between the two areasof information literacy and literacy or literature andits difficult to do as much as you would like in bothareas at the same time. School Four – Teacher-librarian
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