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Renewable energy & its furure prospects in india

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  • 1. RENEWABLE ENERGY & ITS FURURE PROSPECTS IN INDIA SUBMITTED TO ARCHANA SHARMA SUBMITTED BY SURABHI PAL
  • 2. RENEWABLE ENERGY Energy that comes from the sources which are continous replenished such as sunlight , wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal energy.  About 16% of global energy comes from renewable resources.  10% of all energy from traditional biomass  3.4% - hydroelectricity  3% - new renewables 
  • 3. ENERGY DEMAND PROJECTION IN INDIA 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2020-21 2009-10 1991-92 1991-92 2009-10 2020-21
  • 4. Renewable energy replaces four distinct areasElectricity generation  Hot water/space heating  Motor fuels  Rural energy services 
  • 5. HISTORY OF RENEWABLE ENERGY Prior to the development of coal in the mid 19th century nearly all energy was renewable.  By 1873, concerns of running out of coal promoted experiments using Solar energy.  Development of Solar engines continued untill the outbreak of World War 1st.  In the 1970’s enviromentalist promoted the development of renewable energy for replacement of oil and decreasing dependence on oil leading to the first electricity generating Wind Turbine. 
  • 6. HISTORY OF RENEWABLE ENERGY IN INDIA 1970’s energy crisis led to the establishment of the COMISSION FOR ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF ENERGY(CASE) in the Department of Science and Technology in Mach 1981.  In 1982, a new department was created in the Ministry of Energy i.e. Department of Non-conventional Energy Sources(DNES).  A decade later in 1992, DNES became Ministry of Non-conventional Energy Sources(MNES) and in October 2006 it gained its current name as Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. 
  • 7. MAINSTREAM RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES WIND ENERGY HYDROPOWER SOLAR ENERGY BIOMASS ENERGY GEOTHERMAL ENERGY WIND ENERGY      Air flow can be used to run turbines. Wind turbines range from 600kW to 5 MW. Turbines of 1.5-3MW are most common. Areas where winds are stronger are more constant. Long term technical potential of wind energy Is believed to be total 5 times current global energy production.
  • 8.  HYDROPOWER    Energy in water can be harnessed and used. Since water is 800 times denser than air even a slow flowing stream of water can yield considerable amount of energy. Micro – hydro systems produce 100kW of energy. Run of the river hydroelectricity systems derive kinetic from rivers and oceans without creation of a large reservoir.
  • 9. SOLAR ENERGY    Energy from the Sun in the form of Solar radiations for heat or to generate electricity. Solar powered electricity generation uses either photovolatics or heat engines. Other solar applications include space heating and cooling through solar architecture, day lighting, solar hot water, solar cooking and high temperature process
  • 10. BIOMASS ENERGY Through the process of photosynthesis plants capture the solar energy.  When the plants are burnt they release this energy. Thus biomass functions as a natural battery for storing solar energy.  The largest source of biomass is Peat which is classified as slow renewable fuel by IPCC. 
  • 11. GEOTHERMAL ENERGY    It is the energy generated and stored in the Earth. Thermal energy is the energy that determines the temperature of matter. Earth’s geothermal energy originates from the original formation of planet and from radioactive decay of minerals. From hot springs geothermal energy is used for electricity generation.
  • 12. CONTRIBUTION FROM VARIOUS ENERGY RESOURCES WIND SMALL HYDRO BIOMASS & WASTE SOLAR
  • 13. TOTAL RENEWABLE INSTALLED CAPACITY The renewable installed capacity of India stands at 28.686 GW as of 31st March 2013 CUMULATIVE DEPLOYMENT OF VARIOUS RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS AS ON 31/03/2013 RENEWABLE ENERGY TARGET FOR 2012-13 DEPLOYMENT CUMULATIVE ACHIEVEMENT WIND POWER 2500MW 1698.80MW 19051.45MW SMALL HYDRO 350MW 236.93MW 3632.25MW SOLAR POWER 800MW 254.14MW 16.44MW BIOMASS 105MW 114.70MW 1264.80MW BAGASSE 350MW 352.20MW 2337.43MW TOTAL 4125.00MW 3163.17MW 28068.45MW
  • 14. TOTAL RENEWABLE INSTALLED CAPACITY WIND SMALL HYDRO SOLAR PHOTOVOLATIC BIOMASS WASTE TO POWER
  • 15. INDIA’s RENEWABLE ENERGY FUTURE PROSPECTS India stands among top 5 countries in the world in terms of renewable energy.  The installed base is 9% of total power generation capacity & contributes 3% to the electricity mix.  The National Action Plan on Climate Change in June 2008 identified Solar energy development.  In Nov 2009 the GoI approved National Solar Mission which aims to enable 20,000 MW to be dployed in India by 2022.  India occupies 5th position in the World in Wind Energy, hydro projects upto 25 MW capacity 
  • 16. INDIA’s RENEWABLE ENERGY CHALLENGES       To reduce per unit cost of renewable energy. Increase efficiency. Harness lower wind speeds. Challenge the energy of tides and waves to produce energy. Use of larger grids with lower losses of electricity. Use of hydrogen as an energy storage or carrier.
  • 17. FUTURE PLANS OF ENERGY IN INDIA
  • 18. WIND ENERGY The Ministry of New and Renewable energy has fixed a target of 10500MW between 2007-12, but an additional generation capacity of only about 6000MW might be available for commercial use by 2013. MNRE has announced a revised estimation of the potential wind resource in India from 49130MW at 50m Hub height to 102788MW at 80m hub height.
  • 19. HYDRO-POWER The National Energy Policy aims at –  Per capital electricity availability of 1000units  Installed capacity over 200,000MW  Inter-regional transmission capacity of 37000MW  Spinning reserve of 5%  Quality and reliable power. 
  • 20. THERMAL ENERGY Improve performance of underpowering thermal power stations.  To add 78700MW during 11th & 94431MW during the 12th five year plan.  Improve the performance and efficiency of coal based thermal plants.  Save fuel and reduce enviromental impacts. 
  • 21. TIDAL ENERGY Gulf of Kutch Tidal power plant is strongly pushed for construction by the western Gujrat at the Gulf of cambay.  India has a good potential for tidal power generation in sundarbans,WB.  The country’s 1st tidal plant has been proposed to be set up in Durgaduani creek of Sundarbans. 
  • 22. CONCLUSION    There is an urgent need for transition from petrolium based energy system to one based on renewable resources to decrease reliance on depleting reserve e of fossil fuels and to mitigate climate change. It has potential to create employment opportunities especially at all levels especially at rural level. An emphasis on presenting the real picture of massive renewable energy potential, it would be possible to attract foreign investments to herald a Green Energy Revolution in India.