Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Emotions
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Emotions

  • 1,746 views
Published

Psychology Emotions

Psychology Emotions

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,746
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
97
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. EMOTIONS
  • 2. Definition of Emotion Came from the Latin word ''emovere'' which means ''to move out''.  Subjective reactions to experiences that are associated with physiological and behavioral changes(According to Woolfolk)  Feelings that generally have both physiological and cognitive elements and that influence behavior(Acc. to Feldman)  Considered as the building blocks of personality 
  • 3. Basic Emotions (Matlin,1992) Emotion Function FEAR PROTECTION ANGER DESTRUCTION JOY INCORPORATION DISGUST REJECTION ACCEPTANCE REPRODUCTION SADNESS REINTEGRATION SURPRISE ORIENTATION ANTICIPATION EXPLORATION
  • 4. ASPECTS OF EMOTIONS: Personal emotional experiences - characteristics of emotion which people consciously feel, know and describe verbally Physiological or bodily changes - occur during the emotion Behavior of the person - how one acts and what one does Motivational aspect 
  • 5. 3 Ways in Which Emotions Vary: 1.Intensity - shows through the distinction we make between grief and sadness, between fear or panic, or annoyance and fury 2.Similarity - emotions have tones; another is reflected in our acceptance of the fact that joy and disgust 3.Polarity - some emotions are opposite or polar to each other
  • 6. Functions of Emotions 3 MAJOR FUNCTIONS OF EMOTIONS ( BY FELDMAN ) 1.Preparation for action - we are able to respond to changes in our environment because our emotions enable us to prepare to respond to the stimulus in our surroundings 2.Shaping future behavior - one factor that shapes our future behavior is our emotion. - constant exposure to stimuli that stir our emotions enables us to learn, relearn and unlearn a certain behavior.
  • 7. 3.Helping us interact more effectively with others - we are interacting with one another almost every time. - understanding our emotions and emotions of others enables us to symphatize with others
  • 8. Physiological Components of Emotions 1.Dilation of the Pupils 5.Muscle Tremor and Tension 2.Breathing Pattern Changes 6.Salivary Secretion 3.Heart Rate Changes 7.Pilimotor Response (Goosebumps) 4.Blood Pressure Usually 8.Galvanic skin response Rises (Skin Conductance)
  • 9. Types of Emotional Reactions Anger- the primary occasion for anger is when a goal seeking activity is hindered. Depression or grief- situations which cause depressive or grief reactions are similar to those that produce anger. The major difference is that there is more of the element of finality in depressive states than in angry situations. Fear- one of the most troublesome emotional reactions. Love- mainly involves a focusing of strong positive feelings on a person. 
  • 10. JAMES-LANGE Theory of Emotion   The concept of William James and Carl Lange about emotion is that we are having emotional experiences as the result of the body's reaction to the environmental stimulation. We experience emotions as a result of our physiological changes that produce specific sensation. REACT  CRY  STRIKE INTERPRET  SAD  ANGRY
  • 11. Facial Feedback Theory of Emotion A major approach to the James-Lange Theory;  This emphasized on the facial expressions.  It is believed that the facial expressions hold the key in initiating the experience of emotions 
  • 12. Cannon-Bard Theory      Walter Cannon and Philip Bard proposed a different view on explaining the nature of human emotions. Walter and Philip believed that both physiological arousal and emotional experience are produced simultaneously by the same stimulus In perceiving certain stimulus which produces emotion, the thalamus initiates a response that signals the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) and a visceral response is produced. Also, the thalamus sends messages to the cerebral cortex for the understanding of the emotional experiences. The thalamus plays a major function in processing an emotional response or experience.
  • 13. THE CANNON-BARD THEORY STIMULUS Cerebral Cortex AWARENESS OF EMOTIONS THALAMUS Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) PHYSIOLOGIC AL REACTION
  • 14. SCHACHTER-SINGER THEORY   Formulated by Stanley Schachter and Jerome Singer, this theory emphasized that we express emotions through a combination of physiological arousal and environmental cues. We experience emotion based on the physiological arousal and our assessment on our current situation PHYSIOLOGICAL AROUSAL STIMULUS THALAMUS OBSERVATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CUES IDENTIFYING EMOTIONS
  • 15. LAZARUS Cognitive Meditational Theory  It is the stimulus that causes emotional reaction. However, this emotional reaction undergoes the process of cognitive appraisal mediatus or ''to come between'', which means that before the actual physical arousal and emotional experience the person first interprets the arousal before experiencing physiological and emotional experience. STIMULUS APPRAISAL (mediate) EMOTIONA L EXPERIENC E PHYSIOLOGICA L RESPONSE