B.tech it _curriculum-_for_whole_4_yrs

  • 2,268 views
Uploaded on

 

More in: Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • i want answer this question plz ????

    develop a program illustrating the function of the banker's algorithm using any programming language tool
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,268
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
57
Comments
1
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Ref: VIT/SITE/FFCS/B.Tech(IT)/Curriculum/Ver. 1.0 Dt. 25-03-2010 School of Information Technology & Engineering BTech (Information Technology) I. University CoreCourse Course Title LTP C Prerequisite CodeENG101 English for Engineers – I (or) 300 3 ---ENG001 Effective EnglishENG101 English for Engineers – I (or) 300 3ENG102 English for Engineers – II ENG101 Ethics and Values 300 3 --- Comprehensive Examination 2 ---ENV101 Environmental Studies 003 3 ---MAT101 Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations 310 4 ---PHY101 Modern Physics 302 4 ---CHY101 Engineering Chemistry 212 4 ---CSE101 Problem Solving and Computer Programming 202 3 --- Foreign Language 200 2 --- Total Credits 31 II. University ElectiveCourse Course Title LTP C Prerequisite Code University Elective – I 300 3 University elective – II 300 3 Total Credits 06 III. Program Core Course Course Title LTP C Prerequisite CodeMEE101 Engineering Graphics 004 2MEE102 Workshop Practice 002 1MAT106 Differential and Difference Equations 310 4 MAT101ITM105 Discrete Mathematical Structures 310 4ITE102 Information Technology Fundamentals 300 3EEE101 Basic Electrical and Electronics Engineering 302 4ITE103 Data Structures and Algorithms 310 4 ITE101ITE104 Data Structures and Algorithms Lab 003 2 ITE103 (Co) Numerical Analysis 300 3 Linear Algebra 310 4EIT201 Digital Electronics and Microprocessors 300 3 EEE101EIT202 Digital Electronics and Microprocessors Lab 003 2 EIT201 (Co)ITE204 Computer Architecture and Organization 300 3 EIT201ITE203 Theory of Computation 310 4 ITM105ITE201 Object Oriented Programming Concepts 300 3 ITE101ITE202 Object Oriented Programming in C++ Lab 003 2 CSE201 (Co) Probability and Statistics 310 4ITE211 Programming in Java 302 4 ITE201ITE213 Operating Systems 302 4 ITE204ITE215 Human Computer Interaction 300 3 EEE101ITE314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design 300 3 ITE201
  • 2. ITE315 Database Systems 302 4 ---ITE317 Data Communication and Computer Networks 300 3 ITE213ITE318 Computer Networks Lab 003 2 ITE317 (Co)SWE307 Principles of Software Engineering 300 3 ITE201ITE311 Embedded Systems 302 4 ITE204ITE322 Artificial Intelligence 300 3 ITE203ITE328 Distributed Systems 300 3 ITE317ITE325 Web Technologies 300 3 ITE311ITE326 Web Technologies Lab 003 2 ITE325ITE323 Network Programming 302 4 ITE213ITE329 In-plant Training 1 ---ITE411 Computer Graphics and Multimedia 302 4 ITE327ITE417 E-Commerce 300 3 ITE325ITE413 Network Administration 302 4 ITE323ITE416 Data warehousing and Data Mining 300 3 ITE315ITE399 Mini Project 2ITE499 Final Project 20 IV. Program ElectiveITE341 Basic Bio-Informatics 300 3ITE342 Real-Time Systems 300 3ITE343 Open Source Programming 300 3ITE344 System Programming 300 3ITE346 Software Project Management 300 3ITE347 Graph Theory and Its Applications 300 3ITE441 Web Services and Service Oriented Architecture 300 3ITE442 Soft Computing 300 3ITE443 Mobile Computing 300 3ITE444 High-End Computing 300 3ITE445 Digital Image Processing 300 3ITE446 Advanced Database Management Systems 300 3ITE451 Software Agents 300 3ITE452 Natural Language Processing 300 3ITE453 Knowledge Management 300 3ITE454 Geographical Information Systems 300 3ITE455 Parallel Processing 300 3ITE456 Information and Storage Management 300 3 ITE456 Total Credits 09
  • 3. Credit SummaryMinimum Qualifying Credits 180Total Credits Offered(UC+UE+PC+PE)UC 31UE 06PC 134PE 09
  • 4. ENG001 Effective English L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite English at + 2 levelObjectives • To help the second language learners to acquire confidence in their basic writing and speaking. • To enable the students to acquire structure and written expressions required for their profession.Outcomes The learners will get the required training in LSRW through the given tasks. Speaking: Introduction and greetings - asking/offering information - requesting/inviting Writing: Making meaningful sentences from the jumbled words - development of basic writing skills applying studied grammatical structures - hints development Communication & Functional skills: Fundamentals of communication and barriers to effective communication. Corrective Grammar I - parts of speech Speaking: Integrated interrogative and discourse use with targeted vocabulary and functions; Communicative and decision making activities based on authentic reading materials; Authentic video materials to improve extraction of information from the given source. Writing: Rewriting the given texts following the prompts - instructional writing skills - illustrative and descriptive writing. Communication & Functional skills: Non-verbal communication Corrective Grammar II - concord Speaking: Role-plays in various life like situations - debating to express points of view - project development in groups and pair-work to increase communication practice. Writing: Critical appreciation of the given text - narrative written structures to express past events - written communication for task oriented goals. Communication & Functional skills: Listening and negotiating Corrective Grammar III - tenses & error detectionText Books 1. Sunitha Mishra and C. Muralikrishna, Communication Skills for Engineers, Pearson Education. 2. A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet, A Practical English Grammar,OUP, Delhi1.Michael McCarthy and Felicity (2003), English Vocabulary in Use - Advanced, CUP. 3. Andrea J. Rutherford, Basic Communication Skills for Technology, Pearson Education Asia. 4. Murphy, Murphy’s English Grammar with CD, Cambridge University Press. 5. English Skills for Technical Students, WBSCTE with British Council, Orient Longman. 6. Robert J. Dixson (2006), Everyday Dialogues in English, Prentice-Hall of India Ltd. 7. Bhaskaran and Horsburgh, Strengthen Your English,Oxford University Press. 8. M. Ashraf Rizvi, Effective Technical Communication,McGraw-Hill. Adrian Doff and Chris Jones (2006), Language in Use, CambridgeMoE Writing and speaking skills, tests, quizzes, assignments and seminars.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 5. ENG101 English for Engineers – I L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite English at + 2 levelObjectives • To help the second language learners to acquire fluency in spoken and written English. • To make students communicate with clarity and precision in the workplace. • To give the students a perspective to appreciate life in its variables by exposing them to comprehension texts to enrich their word power.Outcomes Enable students to acquire structure and written expression required for their profession. The students will get the required training in LSRW through the prescribed texts. Communication Skills Aspects of Communication and Body Language Textual Comprehension Text 1, 2 Structure and Word Magic Tenses, Concord, Tag Question; Word formation Stylistic Expression Paragraph Writing, Cloze test, Informal letter writing and email Communication Skills Listening and Interpersonal Communication Skills Textual Comprehension Text 3, 4 Structure and Word Magic Voice Conditionals, Transformation of sentences; Work and Study Stylistic Expression General Essay, Note making Communication Skills Speaking and Group discussion Textual Comprehension Text 5, 6 Structure and Word Magic Answer as Directed; Leisure and lifestyle Stylistic Expression Reading ComprehensionText Books 1. English for Professionals - Book 1, Faculty of English, SSH, VIT. 2. Sunita Mishra and C. Muralikrishna, Communication Skills for Engineers. 3. R. Srinivasan and M. Sahul Hameed (2008), Functional Grammar & Composition, VIT Workbook. 4. Michael McCarthy and Felicity (2003), English Vocabulary in Use - Advanced, Cambridge University Press. 5. Krishna Mohan and Meera B. Annerji (1997), Developing Communication Skills, Macmillan India Ltd. 6. Murphy (2006), Essential English Grammar, CUP. 7. Adrian Doff and Chris Jones (2006), Language in Use, Cambridge University Press. 8. Kris Cole (2005), Crystal Clear Communication, East West Book.MoE Writing and speaking skills, tests, quizzes, assignments and seminars.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 6. ENG102 English for Engineers – II L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite English at + 2 levelObjectives • To make the students communicate in English for academic and social purpose. • To develop the ability to write assignments in a style that is appropriate for university study or within a training context. • To develop the ability to understand spoken language in both lecture format, formal and informal conversational styles. • To develop the ability to speak on general and specific topics in real life situations.Outcomes The learners will get the required training in LSRW through the prescribed texts. They will also have a holistic outlook as they go into the world.Unit I Communication Skills 14 Team Talk, Negotiation and Emotional Intelligence Textual Comprehension Text 1, 2 Structure and Word Magic Error Detection (Errors in Formation of Sentences : Tenses, Passivity, Conditionals, Synthesis of Sentences, Direct & Indirect Speeches, Degrees of Comparison, Affirmative & Negative Sentences, Begin with the given word) (- based on workbook); Technology Stylistic Expression Lab Report; Polite Expression; Dialogue Writing; Case StudyUnit II Communication Skills 14 Creativity And Leadership skills Textual Comprehension Text 3, 4 Structure and Word Magic Error Detection (errors in use of words : Nouns, Pronouns, Verbs, Adjectives, Adverbs, Prepositions, Articles, Antonyms / Synonyms, Homonyms, Affixes (from General Study); Health and Travel Stylistic Expression Technical Reports, Transcoding, Business Letter Writing, Technical description.Unit III Communication Skills 14 Mind Mapping and Career Planning (Self-efficacy skills) Textual Comprehension Text 5, 6 Structure and Word Magic Error Detection – contd.; Idioms and Phrasal Verbs Stylistic Expression Tackling Situations / Argumentative EssaysText Books 1.English for Professionals, Book II Ed., Faculty, English – SSH, VIT. 2. Mishra, Sunita & C. Muralikrishna, Communication Skills for Engineers, Pearson Education, Delhi, 2004. 3. Functional Grammar & Composition: VIT Workbook, 2005. (for Semesters I & II) by R. Srinivasan, M.A. Sahul Hameed.Reference Books English Vocabulary in Use Advanced, Michael McCarthy and Felicity, Cambridge University Press, 2003. Developing Communication Skills, Krishna Mohan and Meera Bannerji, Macmillan India Ltd. 1990 Essential English Grammar, Raymond Murphy, Cambridge University Press, 2006. Language in Use, Adrian Doff and Chris Jones, Cambridge University Press, 2006. Corporate Soft skills,Sarvesh Gulati, 2006.
  • 7. Effective Communication, John Adair , Macmillan Ltd.1997.MoE Written Tests & Examinations, Quizzes, Assignments, Seminars. Speaking skills will be tested through assignments.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 8. ENV101 Environmental Studies L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite English at + 2 levelObjectives • Awareness of environmental factors affecting human populationOutcomes • Basic understanding of the major causes of environmental degradation. • Influence of ecological disturbances on human health. • Social and other related factors influencing the human population.Unit I Environment & Natural Resources Improvement Definition, scope, importance, need for public, Natural Resources – forest resources – use, exploitation, deforestation, construction of multipurpose dams – effect on forests, Water resources – use of surface and subsurface water; effect of floods, drought, water conflicts, food resources – food problems, advantage and disadvantage of fertilizers & pesticides, effect on environment, Energy resources – need to develop renewable energy.Unit II Ecology & Bio-diversity Concept of ecosystem, structure & function of an ecosystem, producers, consumers and decomposers, energy flow, ecological succession, food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids. Bio diversity: Definition, genetic, species and ecosystem diversity, bio- geographical classification of India, hotspots, threats related to habitat loss, poaching of wildlife, man-wildlife conflicts, Conservation of bio-diversity.Unit III Environmental Pollution Definition – Causes, pollution effects and control measures of air, water, soil, marine, noise, thermal, nuclear hazards. Solid waste management: causes, effects and control measures of urban and industrial wastes, pollution measures, case studies, Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and landslides.Unit IV Social Issues and the Environment Urban problems related to energy & sustainable development, water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed management, problems related to rehabilitation – case studies, Wasteland reclamation, Consumerism and waste products – Environment Protection Act, air, water, wildlife, Forest Conservation Act, Environmental legislation and public awarenessUnit V Human Population and the Environment Population growth, variation among nations, Population explosion – Family Welfare Programme, Environment and human health, Human Rights, Value Education, HIV/ AIDS, Women and Child Welfare, Role of Information Technology – Visit to local polluted site / Case Studies.Text Books 1. Kurian Joseph & R. Nagendran, “Essentials of Environmental Studies”, 1st Edition, Pearson Education, 2004. 2. Keerthinarayana & Daniel Yesudian,”Environmental Science and Engineering”, 1st Edition, Hi-Tech publications, 2004. 3. Erach Bharucha, “A Text Book for Environmental Studies”, Text Book of University Grants Commission, 2004. 4. Peavy, H.S., D.R. Rowe & T.George, “Environmental Engineering”, New York: Mc Graw Hill, 1987. 5. Metcalf & Eddy,”Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Reuse”, New Delhi, Tata Mc Graw Hill, 2003.MoE Continuous Assessment (Written Exam) and Assignment
  • 9. CSE101 Problem Solving and Computer L T P C Programming 2 0 2 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To provide an overview of computers and problem solving techniques using ‘C’ Language that serve as a foundation for the study of different programming languages.Outcomes By the end of the course, the students are expected to learn, • Various problems solving technique • Implementation of the problem solving techniques using ‘C’ language.Unit I INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS AND ALGORITHMS Parts of a computer – Overview of operating systems, compilers, interpreters and programming languages. Algorithms for exchanging the values of two variables, counting, summation of a set of numbers, factorial computation, sine function computation, generation of the Fibonacci sequence, reversing the digits of an integer, base conversion and character to number conversion.Unit II CONSTRUCTS OF C Lexical elements – Operators - data types – I/O statements – format specifications – control statements – decision making and looping.Unit III ARRAYS Array handling in C – declaration – single dimensional arrays, two – dimensional arrays, multi-dimensional arrays, sorting and searching on single and two dimensional arrays. Array order reversal, array counting or histogramming, finding the maximum number in a set, removal of duplicates from an ordered array, partition an array, finding the kth smallest element strings: Character array – string handling functions – manipulation on strings.Unit IV FUNCTIONS Prototype – declaration - arguments (formal and actual) – return types – types of functions difference between built-in and user-defined functions.Unit V STRUCTURES Declarations - nested structures- array of structures - structure to functions - unions- difference between structure and unionText Books 1.Alexis Leon and Mathews Leon (2001), Introduction to Information Technology, Tata McGraw-Hill. 2.R.G. Dromey (2001), How to Solve it by Computer, Prentice Hall of India. 3.Al Kelley and Ira Pohl (1998), A Book on C Programming in C, 4thEdition, Pearson Education.MoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 10. MGT301 Ethics and Values L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To understand the moral problems faced in the corporate setting and wider philosophical frameworks along with social importance and their intellectual challenges are given its due placement.Outcomes • The students will have hands-on experience with the day-to-day problems and their allied alternative decision making towards social and business environmentUnit I Scope and aims of Professional Ethics. – What is Ethics? - Why Study 15 Ethics? – Professions and Professionalism.-Ethical reasoning and theories – Professional ideals and virtues – Study of reasoning – Theories about right action – Self interest – Customs and religion.Unit II Social Experimentation and Environmental Ethics – Experiments and 15 responsible experimentation’s and moral autonomy and accountability - Code of Ethics and balanced outlook- Responsibility towards employersUnit III Safety and Risk Management – Safety – Risk – Assessment – Risk 15 reduction analysis –. Global Issues in Ethics – Loyalty – Authority - Collective bargaining – Conflicts of Interest – Occupational Crime.Text Books 1. L.H. Newton & Catherine K.D. – Classic cases in Environmental Ethics, Belmont: California Wadsworth, 2006.Reference Books 1. Mike W Martin & Ronald Schnizinger, Engineering Ethics, New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill,Latest Edition 2. OC Ferrell, John Paul Frederich,Linda Ferrell; Business Ethics – Ethical Decision making and Cases- 2007 Edition, Biz Tantra, New DelhiMoE CAT I/CAT II, End Term Tests, Assignments and any of these following components Mini projects/Seminars/ Quizzes /Case Discsussion/Term Ppaer/Class Participation/Assessment of class NotesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 11. MAT101 Multivariable Calculus and L T P C Differential Equations 3 1 0 4Prerequisite Mathematics at 10+2 level (or) Basic Mathematics (MAT001)Objectives • To provide the requisite and relevant background necessary to understand other important engineering mathematics courses offered for Engineers and Scientists. • To introduce three important topics of applied mathematics, viz., multiple integrals, Vector calculus and Laplace transforms.Outcomes • By the end of the course, the students are expected to learn • How to evaluate multiple integrals in Cartesian, Cylindrical and Spherical geometries. • Vector calculus with application in Fluid Dynamics and Electromagnetic fields. • To solve ordinary differential equations.Unit I MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS Functions of two variables - limits and continuity - partial derivatives – total differential – Taylor’s expansion for two variables – maxima and minima –constrained maxima and minima - Lagrange’s multiplier method - JacobiansUnit II MULTIPLE INTEGRALS Evaluation of double integrals – change of order of integration – change of variables between Cartesian and polar co-ordinates - evaluation of triple integrals - change of variables between Cartesian and cylindrical and spherical polar co-ordinates - beta and gamma functions – interrelation - evaluation of multiple integrals using gamma and beta functions - error function and its properties.Unit III VECTOR CALCULUS Scalar and vector valued functions – gradient – physical interpretation - total derivative – directional derivative -divergence and curl – physical interpretations - vector identities (without proof) - scalar and vector potentials -line, surface and volume integrals - Green’s, Stoke’s and Gauss divergence theorems (without proof) -verification and evaluation of vector integrals using them.Unit IV ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Linear higher order ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients – solutions of homogenous and non-homogenous ODEs - method of undetermined coefficients – method of variation of parameters – equations reducible to linear equations with constant coefficients.Unit V LAPLACE TRANSFORMS Definition: Laplace transforms of functions - properties of Laplace transforms - initial and final values theorems - inverse transforms - transforms of periodic functions - convolution theorems – step functions, impulse functions - concept of transfer functions – applications to the solution of differential equations.Text Books 1. G.B. Thomas and R.L. Finney (2002), Calculus and Analytical Geometry, 9 e, Pearson Education 2. Michale D. Greenberg (2002), Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 2nd Edition, Pearson Education. 3. Peter V.O’ Neil (2003), Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 5thEdition, Thomson Brook/Cole. 4. Erwin Kreyszig (2004), Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th Edition., John Wiley & Sons.
  • 12. 5. B.S. Grewal (2005), Higher Engineering Mathematics, 38thEdition, Khanna Publications.Reference BooksMoE Continuous Assessment Tests, assignments, tutorial sheets, class Tests, quizzesRecommended bythe Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 13. MAT 106 Differential and Difference L T P C Equations 3 1 0 4Prerequisite Multivariable Calculus and Differential Equations (MAT101)Objectives • This course is designed to give a comprehensive coverage at an introductory level to the subject of ordinary differential equations and difference equations. Matrix methods and eigen value problems are integrated in to the course. Sufficient emphasis is laid on mathematical modeling and analysis of simple engineering problems.Outcomes • By the end of the course, the students are expected to know how to model simple physical problems in the form of a differential and difference equations, analyze and interpret the solutions. Further the students are expected to acquire necessary background in matrix methods and Eigenvalue problems so as to appreciate their importance to engineering systems.Unit I Matrix methods to Linear Differential Equations 9+3 The eigen value problem- eigen values and eigen vectors - Cayley- Hamilton theorem and its applications- symmetric matrices- properties of eigen values and eigen vectors-similarity of matrices - diagonalisation of a real symmetric matrix-quadratic form. Solution of equations of type X11 + AX=0 - reduction of nth order system to a system of first order equations by diagonalization.Unit II Power Series Solutions 9+3 The Strum-Liouville Problem-orthogonality of eigen functions- Bessel’s and Legendre’s equations- power series solutions – method of Frobenius.Unit III Fourier Series 9+3 Fourier series -Euler’s formulae- Dirichlet’s conditions - change of interval- half range series – RMS value – Parseval’s identity – computation of harmonics.Unit IV Difference Equations and Z-transforms 9+3 Difference equation-first and second order difference equations with constant coefficients-Fibonacci sequence-solution of difference equations- complementary functions - particular integrals by the method of undetermined coefficients. Z-transform-relation to Laplace transforms - Z-transforms of standard functions-inverse Z-transforms by partial fraction method-by convolution- solution of simple difference equations using Z-transforms.Unit V Applications of Differential Equations 9+3 First order equations: Newton’s law of cooling – radioactive decay, L-R and C-R circuits-Equation of motion for a particle in gravitational field – Terminal velocity. Second order equations: Free undamped and damped vibrations, Forced oscillations-Resonance phenomenon, series LCR circuit - Model of a vibrating systems with two masses – Solutions by matrix methods.Text Books 1. Erwin Kreysizing, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, (Wiley student Edison)(2004). 2. B.S.Grewal, Higher Engineering Mathematics, 40th Edition. Khanna Publications(2007).Reference Books 1. W.E.Boyce and R.C. Diprima, Elementary differential equations, 7th Edition. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.(2002). 2. Michale D. Greenberg, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 2nd Edition, Pearson
  • 14. Education, First Indian reprint (2002). 3. Peter V. O’ Neil, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 5th Edition, Thomson, Book/Cole (2003). 4. C. Ray Wylie, Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 6th Edn, McGraw Hill (1995). 5. Gary L. Peterson, Linear Algebra and Differential Equations, Addison-Wesley (2002). James C. Robinson, “An introduction to ordinary differential equations”, Cambridge Univ. Press(2000).MoE Continuous Assessment Tests, Assignments, Tutorial sheets, Class Tests, Quizzes.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 15. MAT 104 Probability and Statistics L T P C 3 1 0 4Prerequisite MAT101 Multivariable calculus and Differential EquationsObjectives • To provide the mathematical support by way of probabilistic models and statistical methodology to tackle problems encountered in Science and Engineering applications.Outcomes • Understand basic notions of probability arising in a variety of uncertain situations which are nontraditional in areas of science and engineering. • Knowing the basic tools of statistical methods • Emphasize the study of data analysis leading to probabilistic modelsUnit I Random Variables 9+3 Random variables- distribution and density functions-random vectors-joint distribution and joint density functions- conditional distribution and density functions-co-variance-correlation - mathematical expectation - moment generating function – characteristic function.Unit II Distributions 9+3 Binomial and Poisson distributions – normal distribution – gamma and exponential distributions – Weilbull distribution - regression and correlation – partial and multiple correlation- multiple regression.Unit III Testing Hypothesis 9+3 Large sample tests- procedure of testing hypothesis- small sample tests- Student’s t-test - F-test- chi-square test- independence of attributes and goodness of fit.Unit IV ANOVA 9+3 Analysis of variance – one and two way classifications - CRD- RBD- LSD.Unit V Non Parametric Tests 9+3 Non-parametric tests-sign test-signed-rank test-rank-sum test- Kruskal-Wallis test-runs test- tolerance limits-rank correlation coefficient.Text Books R.E.Walpole, R.H.Mayers, S.L.Mayers and K.Ye, Probability and Statistics for engineers th and scientists, 7 Edition, Pearson Education (2003). thReference Books 1. J.L.Devore, Probability and Statistics, 5 Edition, Thomsun (2000). 2. R.A.Johnson, Miller & Freund’s Probability and Statistics for Engineers, seventh edition, Pearson Education, Delhi (2008).MoE Continuous Assessment Tests, Assignments, Tutorial sheets, Class Tests, Quizzes.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 16. MAT202 Linear Algebra L T P C 3 1 0 4Prerequisite MAT101 Multivariable Calculus and Differential EquationsObjectives • Linear algebra is one of the most important subjects in the study of engineering because of its widespread applications in electrical, communications and computer science. The objective of this course is to give a presentation of basic concepts of linear algebra to illustrate its power and utility through applications to computer science and engineering.Outcomes • By the end of the course the students are expected to learn the concepts of vector space, linear transformations, matrices and inner product space. Further the students are expected to solve problems in cryptography, computer graphics and some physicalUnit I Linear Equations and Matrices 10+3 System of linear equations- Gaussian elimination/Jordan – block matrices- elementary matrices- finding inverse of matrices-permutation matrix-- LDU factorization- applications to cryptography and electrical network.Unit II Vector space 10+3 Vector spaces- sub spaces – -bases-spanning space-dimensions-linear combination-linearly dependent-independent -finite dimensional-row and column spaces – Rank and nullity – invertibility- application to interpolation.Unit III Linear transformations 13+4 Linear transformations – invertible linear transformation- matrices of linear transformations – vector space of linear transformations – change of bases – similarity – application to computer graphics.Unit IV Inner product spaces 13+4 Inner products – the lengths and angles of vectors – matrix representations of inner products- Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization – projection-orthogonal projections – relations of fundamental subspaces – orthogonal matrices and isometrics – applications to least square solutions.Text Books Jin Ho Kwak and Sungpyo Hong, Linear Algebra, Second edition, Springer (2004). (Chapters 1,3,4 and 5).Reference Books 1. Stephen Andrilli and David Hecher, Elementary Linear Algebra, 3rd Edition, Academic Press(2006) 2. Charles W. Curtis, Linear Algebra, Springer (2004) 3. Howard Anton and Robert C Busby, Contemporary linear algebra, John Wiley (2003). 4. Gilbert Strang, Introduction to Linear Algebra, 4th Edition, Wellesley-Cambridge Press (2009).MoE Continuous assessment Examination, Assignments, Tutorial sheets, Class Test, Quiz.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 17. PHY101 Modern Physics L T P C 3 0 2 4Prerequisite Physics as one subject in 12thStandard or equivalent level.Objectives • To enable the students to understand the basics of the latest advancements in Physics, viz., Quantum Mechanics, Lasers, Fiber Optics, Ultrasonics, Microwaves and Nanotechnology.Outcomes • At the end of the course, students will acquire the necessary knowledge about modern physics and its applications in various engineering and technology disciplines.Unit I QUANTUM PHYSICS Dual nature of electron magnetic radiation - de Broglie waves – Compton Effect experimental verification -Heisenberg uncertainty principle – Schrodinger equation – application - particle in a box (ID) – Spectroscopy. Application of Quantum Mechanics - Scanning Tunneling Microscope - Atomic Force Microscope problems.Unit II LASER Laser characteristics - Einstein’s coefficients - its significance - population inversion - three level, four level laser – Schawlow and Townes condition – Nd. YAG, He-Ne-CO2laser – welding, drilling, cutting – optical disk systems – recording – data readout from optical disks – Holography – Recording and Reconstruction – Problems.Unit III FIBER OPTICS Light propagation through fibers – Acceptance angle - numerical aperture – types of fibers – step index, graded index – single mode, multimode – dispersion– intermodal, intramodal – application of fiber optics in communication – source LED – Laser diode – Detector – PIN photodiode – endoscope – problems.Unit IV ULTRASONIC AND MICROWAVES Properties – generation – Magnetostriction method – Piezo-electric method – detection of ultrasonic – applications- NDT Characteristic features of micro waves – TE and TM modes – Klystron – Gunn diode – applications of microwaves.Unit V NANOTECHNOLOGY Nanoscale – Nanomaterials – properties of Nanomaterials – Moore’s Law Semiconductor nanoparticles – Nanocomposites – Quantum well – Wire – Dots – Nanolithography – Applications of Nanotechnology – Aerospace components – sensors – Medicine.Text Books 1. B.B. Laud, Lasers and Non-Linear Optics, 2ndEdition, New Ages International. 2. Ghatak and K. Thyagarajan (2002), Introduction to Fiber Optics, Cambridge University Press. 3. William Silfvast (2002), Laser Fundamentals, Cambridge University Press. 4. Djafar K. Mynbaeu (2004), Fibre Optic Communication Technology, Pearson Education Asia. 5. Kittel (2001), Solid State Physics, 7thEdition, John Wiley & Sons. 6. K.C. Gupta (2002), Microwaves, New Age International. 7. Arthur Beiser (2003), Concepts of Modern Physics, 6thEdition, Tata-McGraw Hill. 8. Charles P. Poole, Jr. and Frank J. Owens (2003), Introduction to Nanotechnology, John Wiley & Sons 9. Edward L. Wolf (2006), Nano Physics and Nanotechnology – An introduction to Modern Concepts in Nanoscience, Wiley VCH verlagambh & Co., Weinheim.
  • 18. Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, surprise test, quizzes, assignments, seminar, group discussionRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 19. ITM105 Discrete Mathematical Structures L T P C 3 1 0 4Prerequisite EIT201Objectives • The aim of this course is to motivate the students to address the challenge of the relevance of inference theory, Algebraic structures and graph theory to computer science and engineering problems.Outcomes • By the end of the course, the students are expected to use inference theory in circuit models, and algebraic theory in computer science problems, graph theory in net work models and lattices & Boolean algebra in Boolean functionsUnit I SETS, RELATIONS AND FUNCTIONS 9 Sets (Venn diagrams, complements, Cartesian products, power sets); Pigeonhole principle; Cardinality and countability; Relations (reflexivity, symmetry, transitivity, equivalence relations); Functions (surjections, injections, inverses, composition).Unit II BASIC LOGIC 9 Propositional logic; Logical connectives; Truth tables; Normal forms (conjunctive and disjunctive); Validity; Predicate logic; Universal and existential quantification; Modus ponens and modus tollens; Limitations of predicate logic.Unit III PROOF TECHNIQUES 9 Notions of implication, converse, inverse, contrapositive, negation, and contradiction; The structure of formal proofs; Direct proofs; Proof by counterexample; Proof by contraposition; Proof by contradiction; Mathematical induction; Strong induction; Recursive mathematical definitions; Well orderings.Unit IV BASICS OF COUNTING 9 Counting arguments – Sum and product rule, Inclusion-exclusion principle, Arithmetic and geometric progressions, Fibonacci numbers; the pigeonhole principle; Permutations and combinations – Basic definitions, Pascal‟s identity, and the binomial theorem; solving recurrence relations – Common examples, The Master theoremUnit V GRAPHS AND TREES 9 Trees; Undirected graphs; Directed graphs; Spanning trees; Traversal strategies. DISCRETE PROBABILITY:Finite probability space, probability measure, events; Conditional probability, independence, Bayes‟ theorem; Integer random variables, expectation.Text Books 1.Kolman and Busby, Discrete Mathematical Structures for Computer ScienceReference Books 1. J.P. Trembley and R. Manohar, Discrete Mathematical Structures with Applications to Computer Science, Tata McGraw Hill – 13th reprint (2001). 2. Richard Johnsonbaugh, Discrete Mathematics, 5th Edition, Pearson Education (2001). 3. S. Lipschutz and M. Lipson, Discrete Mathematics, Tata McGraw Hill, 2nd Edition (2000). 4. B.Kolman, R.C.Busby and S.C.Ross, Discrete Mathematical structures, 4th Edition, PHI(2002). 5. C.L.Liu, Elements of Discrete Mathematics, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw Hill (2002).MoE Written examinations, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 20. ITE203 Theory of Computation L T P C 3 1 0 4Prerequisite Discrete Mathematical Structures, Algorithm Design and AnalysisObjectives • To provide an understanding of the basic concepts in theoretical computer science. • To comprehend complex concepts and formal proofs in theoretical computer science in order to improve reasoning and problem solving skills. • To prepare students for more advanced courses in automation theory, formal languages, algorithms & logicOutcomes At the end of the course students should able to • Understand the essence of computing through simple computational models; • Apply these models in practice to solving problems in diverse areas such as pattern matching, cryptography, and language design; • Understand the limitations of computing, the relative power of formal languages and the inherent complexity of many computational problems of practical importance;Unit I AUTOMATA Strings, Alphabet, Language, Operations, Finite State Machine, definitions, finite automation model, acceptance of strings and languages, on deterministic finite automation, deterministic finite automation, equivalence between NFA and DFA, Conversion of NFA into DFA, minimization of FSM ,equivalence between two FSMs, Moore and Malay machines.Unit II REGULAR EXPRESSIONS Regular sets, regular expressions, identity rules, manipulation of regular expressions, equivalence between RE and FA, inter conversion, Pumping lemma, Closure properties of regular sets(proofs not required),regular grammars, right linear and left linear grammars equivalence between regular linear grammar and FA, inter conversion between RE and RG.Unit III CONTEXT FREE GRAMMARS Context free Grammars, Derivation trees, Left Most Derivations, Right Most Derivations, Ambiguity in Context-Free Grammars, Specifications of Context Free Grammars, Normal Forms, Chomsky Normal Form (CNF), Greibach Normal Form (GNF)Unit IV TURING MACHINE Turing machine, definition, model, design of TM, Computable Functions, recursive enumerable language, Church’s Hypothesis, Counter machine, types of TMs(Proofs not required).Unit V CLASSES OF PROBLEMS Chomsky hierarchy of languages, linear bounded automats and context sensitive language, Introduction to DCFL and DPDA,LR(O) Grammar, decidability of problems, Universal Turing Machine, undecidability of post’s correspondence problem. Turing reducibility, definition of P and NP problems, NP complete and NP hard problemsText Books 1. J. E. Hopcroft, R. Motwani, and J. D. Ullman, Introduction to automata theory, languages, and computation, Addison- Wesley, 2006. 2. Krishna Murthy E.V. "introduction to theory of Computer Science", Afiiliate Easte West Press
  • 21. 3. Lewis H.P. & Papadimition C.H. "Elements of Theory of Computation", Prentice HallReference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 22. ITE327 Graph Theory and Its Applications L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE103 Theory of ComputationObjectives • This subject aims to cover basic concepts of Graph theoryOutcomes • The students would be able to understand and explain fundamentals of Graph Theory their applications.Unit I INTRODUCTION Definitions, importance, isomorphism, walk, paths, circuits, connected, disconnected graphs, operation on graphs operation on graphs, Euler and Hamiltonian graphs.Unit II TREES Properties, distance and centers, trees, spanning trees, fundamental circuits, minimal spanning tree, Cut sets Properties, fundamental circuits and cut sets, connectivity, separatability, network flows, 1-2 isomorphism ,Planar and dual graphs, Combinatorial representation, planar graphs, kuratowski’s graphs, detection of planarity, dual graphs.Unit III MATRIX REPRESENTATION OF GRAPHS Incidence matrix, circuit matrix, cut set matrix, fundamental matrices, relationships amongst matrices, path matrix, and adjacency matrix.Unit IV COLORING, COVERING AND PARTITIONING Chromatic number, chromatic partitioning, matching, covering, four color problemUnit V DIRECTED GRAPHS Different types, directed paths and connectedness, Euler digraphs, trees- matrix representation, tournament. Graph theoretic algorithms , Computer representation of graphs – input & output, algorithms for connectedness, spanning tree, fundamental circuits, cut vertices, directed circuits and shortest paths.Text Books 1. Narasing Deo, Graph Theory With Application To Engineering And Computer Science, Prentice Hall India, 1995. (Chapters 1 To 5,7 To 9,11.1 To11.5) 2. Tulasiraman And M.N.S. Swamy, Graph, Networks And Algorithms, John Wiley, 1981. 3. F.Harary, Graph Theory, Addison Wesley/ Narosa, 1998. 4. E.M.Reingold, J.Nievergelt, N.Deo, Combinatorial Algorithms: Theory and Practice, Prentice Hall, N.J.1977.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 23. Numerical Analysis L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite Differential and Difference EquationsObjectives • To provide concepts of numerical methods that can cab used in many engineering applications.Outcomes • On completion of this course student able to apply numerical algorithms concepts in engineering applicationsUnit I SOLUTION OF EQUATIONS AND EIGEN VALUE PROBLEMS Iterative method, Newton – Raphson method for single variable and for simultaneous equations with two variables. Solutions of a linear system by Gaussian, Gauss-Jordan, Jacobi and Gauss – Seidel methods. Inverse of a matrix by Gauss – Jordan method. Eigen value of a matrix by Power and Jacobi methods.Unit II INTERPOLATION Newton’s divided difference formulae, Lagrange’s and Hermite’s polynomials. Newton forward and backward difference formulae. Stirling’s and Bessel’s Central difference formulae.Unit III NUMERICAL DIFFERENTIATION AND INTEGRATION Numerical differentiation with interpolation polynomials, Numerical integration by Trapezoidal and Simpson’s (both 1/3rd and 3/8th) rules. Two and Three point Gaussian quadrature formula. Double integrals using Trapezoidal and Simpson’s rule.Unit IV INITIAL VALUE PROBLEMS FOR ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Single step Methods – Taylor Series, Euler and Modified Euler, Runge – Kutta method of order four for first and second order differential equations. Multistep Methods-Milne and Adam’s Bashforth predictor and corrector methods.Unit V BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS FOR ORDINARY AND PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS Finite difference solution for the second order ordinary differential equations. Finite difference solution for one dimensional heat equation (both implicit and explicit), One-dimensional wave equation and two- dimensional Laplace and Poisson equations.Text Books 1. Sastry, S.S., “Introductory Methods of Numerical Analysis (Third Edition)”, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 1998. 2. Kandasamy, P.,Thilakavthy, K. and Gunavathy, K. “Numerical Methods”, S.Chand and Co., New Delhi ,1999. 3. Grewal B.S., Grewal J.S., “Numerical Methods in Engineering and Science”, Khanna Publishers, New Delhi, 1999. 4. Jain M.K., Iyengar S.R.K and Jain R.K., “Numerical Methods for Engineering and Scientific Computation (Third Edition)”, New Age International (P) Ltd., New Delhi, 1995. 5. Gerald C.F., Wheatley P.O., Applied Numerical Analysis (Fifth Edition), Addison – Wesley, Singapore, 1998. 6. Narayanan S., Manickavachakam Pillai K. and Ramanaiah G., “Advanced Mathematics for Engineering Students-Vol.-III”, S.Viswanathan Pvt. Ltd., Chennai, 1993.MoE Written examinations, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 24. CHY101 Engineering Chemistry L T P C 2 1 2 4Prerequisite Basic Chemistry at 12thStandard or equivalent level.Objectives • To impart technological aspects of modern chemistry • To lay foundation for the application of chemistry in engineering and technology disciplines.Outcomes • At the end of the course, the students will be familiar with the fundamentals of water technology; corrosion and its control; applications of polymers in domestic and engineering areas; types of fuels and their applications; and recent trends in electrochemical energy storage devices.Unit I Water Technology 8 Hardness of water: Hard and soft water, Units of Hardness (numerical problems). Disadvantages of hard water: Scale and sludge, caustic embrittlement, priming and foaming, corrosion. Estimation of hardness: EDTA, alkali titration method (numerical problems). Softening methods: Lime soda (numerical problems), zeolite, ion exchange, mixed bed deionizer, treatment of municipal water. Desalination: Desalination of sea water, brakish water, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis.Unit II Corrosion & Corrosion Control 8 Corrosion: Types and causes of corrosion, factors influencing corrosion, corrosion inhibitors. Corrosion control: Protective coatings, electroplating, metal finishing, physical vapour deposition, chemical vapour deposition. High energy coating processes: Ion implantation.Unit III Polymers 8 Classification of polymers: Thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics - properties and industrial applications of important thermoplastic, thermosetting plastics. Moulding of plastics into articles: Compression, injection, transfer and extrusion methods. Conducting polymers: Properties and applications - biodegradable polymers.Unit IV Fuels and Combustion 8 Fuels: Classification of fuels, calorific value - LCV, HCV; measurement of calorific value using bomb calorimeter (numerical problems). Combustion: Calculation of air qualities (problems). Liquid Fuels: Knocking and anti- knocking for petrol and diesel (octane number and cetane number) - diesel index. Gaseous fuels: LPG, natural gas, CNG: Composition and applications. Biofuels: Biodiesel and Biogas -composition and applications.Unit V Electrochemical Energy systems 8 Electrochemical energy systems: Basic concepts of electrochmical energy systems. Conventional primary batteries: Dry cell. Advanced primary batteries: Lithium and alkaline primary batteries. Conventional secondary batteries: Lead-acid, nickel-cadmium secondary batteries. Advanced secondary batteries: Nickel-Metal hydride and lithium-ion secondary batteries. Fuel cells: Key issues – Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells - new generation fuel cells – electric vehicle application – solid oxide fuel cells.Text Books 1. P.C. Jain and M. Jain (2006), Engineering Chemistry, 15th Edition, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Co., New Delhi. 2. S.S. Dara (2006), A Text book of Engineering Chemistry, 11th Revised Edition, S. Chand & Co Ltd., New Delhi.Reference Books 1.B.R. Puri and L.R. Sharma (2004), Principles of Physical Chemistry, 27th Edition, Vishal Publishing Co.2.J.C. Kuriacose and J. Rajaram (1996), Chemistry in Engineering and Technology, Vol. 1, Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company, New Delhi. 3.David Linden (2002), Hand Book of Batteries, 3rdEdition, McGraw Hill Publishers.MoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzes.Recommended
  • 25. by the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil EEE101 Basic Electrical and Electronics L T P C Engineering 3 0 2 4Prerequisite Physics at +2 or equivalent level.Objectives • To provide overview of electrical and electronics engineering that serve the foundation for advanced studies in the area of electrical and electronics engineeringOutcomes • On completion of this course student able to understand the concepts of electrical and electronics engineeringUnit I Elementary Circuit Analysis Ohm’s law, KCL, KVL, node voltage analysis, mesh current, circuits with dependant and controlled sources, Thevenin’s & Norton’s equivalent, maximum power transfer and superposition theorem, VI characteristics for capacitors and inductors.Unit II Analysis of DC and AC Circuits Steady state DC analysis, RL and RC transients in circuits with DC source, analysis of a second order circuit with a DC source, RMS values, the use of phasors for constant frequency sinusoidal sources, steady state AC analysis of a series circuit, series and parallel combinations of complex impedances, AC power calculations.Unit III Digital Systems Basic logic circuit concepts, representation of numerical data in binary form - combinatorial logic circuits, synthesis of logic circuits, minimization of logic circuits - sequential logic circuits - computer organization, memory types, digital process control, computer based instrumentation systems, measurement concepts and sensors, signal conditioning, analog to digital conversion.Unit IV Semiconductor Devices Basic diode concepts, zener diode voltage regulator concepts, ideal diode model, rectifier and wave-shaping circuits, linear small signal equivalent circuits, basic amplifier concepts, cascaded amplifiers, ideal amplifiers, differential amplifiers, NMOS and PMOS transistors, bias circuits, small signal equivalent circuits, CMOS logic gates, bipolar junction transistors, current and voltage relationship, common emitter characteristics, large signal DC circuit models, small signal equivalent circuits, ideal operational amplifiers, inverting and non-inverting amplifiers, integrators & differentiators.Unit V Electromechanics Magnetic fields and circuits, self and mutual inductance, ideal and real transformers, principles of rotating DC machines, shunt, separately excited and series connected DC motors, speed control of DC motors, 3- phase induction motors, synchronous machines and single phase induction motors, stepper motors and brushless DC motors.Text Books 1. Allan R. Hambley (2008),Electrical Engineering-Principles and Applications, Pearson Education. 2. D.P. Kothari and I.J. Nagrath (2002), Basic Electrical Engineering, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw-Hill. 3. D.P. Kothari and I.J. Nagrath (1998), Theory and Problem of Basic Electrical
  • 26. Engineering, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi. 4. R.A. DeCarlo and Pen-Min Lin (2001), Linear Circuit Analysis, 2ndEdition, Oxford University Press, New Delhi. 5. W.H. Hayt, J.E. Kemmerly and S.M. Durbin (2002),Engineering Circuit Analysis, 6thEdition, Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi.Reference BooksMoE Assignments, seminars, written examinationsRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 27. ITE101 Information Technology L T P C Fundamentals 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The subject aims to introduce various IT related concepts of current Interest. The subject focuses on important application areas of computing and Information Technologies.Outcomes • The students will be able to understand the importance of IT in business environment and the technologies involved in knowledge engineering. The students will acquire basic knowledge about Internet, multimedia, virtual reality based concepts. The students will be exposed to the application areas of IT.Unit I IT IN THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT Introduction: Business and Information Technology, Information Technologies in the Modern Organization, Information Technology for Multimedia Communication, Principles of Visual Information Analysis.Unit II IT INFRASTRUCTURE Computer Hardware, Computer Software, Managing Organizational Data and Information, Telecommunications and Networks, The Internet, Intranets, and Extranets.Unit III APPLYING IT FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Functional, Enterprise, and Inter-organizational Systems, Electronic Commerce, Computer-Based Supply Chain Management and Information Systems Integration, Data, Knowledge, and Decision Support, Intelligent Systems in Business.Unit IV INFORMATIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS Strategic Information Systems and Reorganization, Information Systems Development, Implementing IT: Ethics, Impacts and Security.Unit V IMPORTANT APPLICATION AREAS Issues & Challenges, IT in Healthcare & Telemedicine, Remote Sensing and GIS Techniques, Cybermediary Concepts, Principles and Applications of Soft Computing, Industrial information Technology, IT in Mining and Electrical Load Forecasting, Information Processing from Document Images, IT for Rural Development.Text Books 1. Efraim Turban, R. Kelly Rainer, Richard E. Potter, "Introduction to Information Technology", John Wiley & Sons, 2002. 2. Ray Ajoy Kumar, Acharya Tinku, "Information Technology: Principles and Applications", Prentice Hall of India. Dennis P. Curtin, Kim Foley, Kunal Sen, Cathleen Morin, “Introduction to Information Technology – The breaking ware” – Tata McGraw hill.Reference BooksMoERecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 28. ITE201 Object Oriented Programming L T P C Concepts 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE101Objectives • To introduce the salient features of Object Oriented Programming, with focus on generic programming with templates and Exception Handling.Outcomes • Students will be able to know the fundamentals of object oriented programming and incorporate OOPs’ features such as inheritance, polymorphism and templates.Unit I Introduction to Fundamentals concepts Object oriented fundamentals- Structured versus object-oriented development, elements of object oriented programming, fundamentals of OO-class, object, and abstraction and its importance, encapsulation, polymorphism, benefits of OOP, structure of object oriented program..Unit II Classes and Objects Working with classes- Classes and Objects- Class specification, class objects, accessing class members, defining member functions, inline functions, accessing member functions within class, data hiding, class member accessibility, empty classes, constructors, parameterized constructors, constructor overloading, copy constructor, new, delete operators, “this” pointer, friend classes and friend functions.Unit III Overloading Overloading-Function overloading, operator overloading- overloadable operators, unary operator overloading, operator keyword, limitations of increment/decrement operators, binary operator overloading, arithmetic operators, concatenation of strings, comparison operators, Generic programming with templates-Function templates, class templates.Unit IV Inheritance Inheritance- Base class and derived class relationship, derived class declaration, Forms of inheritance, inheritance and member accessibility, constructors in derived class, destructors in derived class, constructor invocation and data member initialization, data conversion, abstract classes, virtual base classes, virtual functions.Unit V Exception handling and Files Files and Streams-Opening and Closing a file, file modes, file pointers and their manipulation, sequential access to a file, ASCII and binary files, random access to a file, error handling during file manipulations, Exception handling-exception handling model, exception handling constructs, lists of exceptions, catching exceptions, handling exceptions.Text Books 1. K.R.Venugopal, T.Ravishankar, and Rajkumar, "Mastering C++”, Tata McGraw Hill, 1997 2. Herbert Schildt “ Java: The complete reference J2SE 5 Edition” Tata McGraw- Hill , 2005 3. Bjarne stroustrup, “The C++ programming Language”, Addison Wesley, 3rd edition, 1988. 4. Cay S.Horstmann and Gray Carnell, “ Core Java Volume I –Fundamentals”, The sun Microsystems Press Jvava Series,2000.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 29. ITE202 Object Oriented Programming in L T P C C++ Lab 0 0 3 2Prerequisite ITE201Objectives • To make the students learn object oriented way of solving problems. • To teach the student to write programs in C++ to solve the problemsOutcomes At the end of the course students should able to • Improve their programming skill. • Apply the object oriented technology for application developmentExercises 1. Program illustrating function overloading feature. 2. Programs illustrating the overloading of various operators Ex : Binary operators, Unary operators, New and delete operators etc. 3. Programs illustrating the use of following functions : a) Friend functions b) Inline functions c) Static Member functions d) Functions with default arguments. 4. Programs illustrating the use of destructor and the various types of constructors (no arguments, constructor, constructor with arguments, copy constructor etc). 5. Programs illustrating the various forms of inheritance : Ex. Single, Multiple, multilevel, hierarchical inheritance etc. 6. Write a program having student as on abstract class and create many derived classes such as Engg. Science, Medical, etc. from students class. Create their objects and process them. 7. Write a program illustrating the use of virtual functions. 8. Write a program which illustrates the use of virtual base class. 9. Write programs to illustrating file handling operations: Ex. a) Copying a text files b) Displaying the contents of the file etc. 10. Write programs illustrating how exceptions are handled (ex: division-by-zero, overflow and underflow in stack etc)MoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 30. ITE204 Computer Architecture and L T P C Organization 3 0 0 3Prerequisite Digital Electronics and MicroprocessorsObjectives • To Gain an understanding of computer data representation and manipulation • To understand the basic organization for data storage and access across various media. • To provide knowledge of interfacing techniques and subsystem devices.Outcomes The students will be able to • Understand number systems, instruction sets, addressing modes, and data/instruction formats. • Write program using assembly language programming. • Understand memory control, direct memory access, interrupts, and memory organizationUnit I FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE Organization of the von Neumann machine; Instruction formats; The fetch/execute cycle, instruction decoding and execution; Registers and register files; Instruction types and addressing modes; Subroutine call and return mechanisms; Programming in assembly language; I/O techniques and interrupts; Other design issues.Unit II COMPUTER ARITHMETIC Data Representation, Hardware and software implementation of arithmetic unit for common arithmetic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division( Fixed point and floating point); Conversion between integer and real numbers; The generation of higher order functions from square roots to transcendental functions; Representation of non-numeric data (character codes, graphical data);Unit III MEMORY SYSTEM ORGANIZATION AND ARCHITECTURE Memory systems hierarchy; Coding, data compression, and data integrity; Electronic, magnetic and optical technologies; Main memory organization, Types of Main memories, and its characteristics and performance; Latency, cycle time, bandwidth, and interleaving; Cache memories (address mapping, line size, replacement and write-back policies); Virtual memory systems; Reliability of memory systems; error detecting and error correcting systems.Unit IV INTERFACING AND COMMUNICATION I/O fundamentals: handshaking, buffering; I/O techniques: programmed I/O, interrupt-driven I/O, DMA; Interrupt structures: vectored and prioritized, interrupt overhead, interrupts and reentrant code; Buses: bus protocols, local and geographic arbitration.Unit V DEVICE SUBSYSTEMS External storage systems; organization and structure of disk drives and optical memory; Basic I/O controllers such as a keyboard and a mouse; RAID architectures; Video control; I/O Performance; SMART technology and fault detection; Processor to network interfaces.Text Books 1. J. L. Hennessy & D.A. Patterson, Computer architecture: A quantitative approach, Fourth Edition, Morgan Kaufman, 2004. 2. W. Stallings, Computer organization and architecture, Prentice-Hall,2000 3. M. M. Mano, Computer System Architecture, Prentice-Hall 4. J. P. Hayes, Computer system architecture, McGraw HillMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 31. ITE213 Operating Systems L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE204 Computer Architecture and OrganizationObjectives • To provide a grand tour of the major operating system components. • To impart knowledge of process, memory and device management • To teach security issues related to OS.Outcomes The students will be able to • Understand how the operating system abstractions can be implemented • Understand the principles of concurrency and synchronization, and apply them to write correct concurrent programs/software. • Understand basic resource management techniques (scheduling or time management, space management) and how they can be implemented. • Use Linux system, windows 2000.Unit I FUNDAMENTALS Overview: Role and purpose of operating systems; history of operating system development; functionality of a typical operating system; design issues (efficiency, robustness, flexibility, portability, security, compatibility). Basic principles: Structuring methods; abstractions, processes, and resources; design of application programming interfaces (APIs); device organization; interrupts; user/system state transitions.Unit II PROCESS MANAGEMENT Scheduling: Preemptive and non-preemptive scheduling; scheduling policies; processes and threads; real-time issues; Concurrency: The idea of concurrent execution; states and state diagrams; implementation structures (ready lists, process control blocks, and so forth); dispatching and context switching; interrupt handling in a concurrent environment; Mutual exclusion: Definition of the “mutual exclusion” problem; deadlock detection and prevention; solution strategies; models and mechanisms (semaphores, monitors, condition variables, rendezvous); producer-consumer problems; synchronization; multiprocessor issues.Unit III MEMORY MANAGEMENT Review of physical memory and memory management hardware; overlays, swapping, and partitions; paging and segmentation; page placement and replacement policies; working sets and thrashing; caching.Unit IV SECONDARY STORAGE MANAGEMENT Device management: Characteristics of serial and parallel devices; abstracting device differences; buffering strategies; direct memory access; recovery from failures. File systems: Fundamental concepts (data, metadata, operations, organization, buffering, sequential vs. nonsequential files); content and structure of directories; file system techniques (partitioning, mounting and unmounting, virtual file systems); memory-mapped files; special-purpose file systems; naming, searching, and access; backup strategies.Text Books 1. A. Silberschatz, P.B. Galvin & G. Gagne, Operating system concepts, John Wiley,2005 2. W. Stallings, Operating systems, Prentice-Hall,2005Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 32. Operating Systems Lab L T P CITE214 0 0 3 2Prerequisite ITE213Objectives • To implement the basic resource management technique [Processor, Memory] • To design and implement synchronization, concurrency related problems.Outcomes The students will be able to • Simulate the principles of resource management [Processor, Memory] • Install and use operating systems [Windows, Linux etc.,]Exercises 1. Program to report the behavior of the OS to get the CPU type and model, kernal version. 2. Program to get the amount of memory configured into the computer, amount of memory currently available. 3. Implement the various process scheduling mechanisms such as FCFS, SJF, Priority, round – robin. 4. Implement the solution for reader – writer’s problem. 5. Implement the solution for dining philosopher’s problem. 6. Implement banker’s algorithm. 7. Implement the first fit; best fit and worst fit file allocation strategy. 8. Write a program to create processes and threads. 9. Write a program that uses a waitable timer to stop itself K. Sec. After it started where K is a command line parameter.MoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 33. ITE317 Data Communication and Computer L T P C Networks 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To study the foundational principles, architectures, and techniques employed in computer networks. • To study the concepts of communication networks, protocols and their performance.Outcomes Students shall be able to • Understand about working of Intranet, LAN, WAN, MAN setups, different topologies. • Gain familiarity with common networking protocols and algorithms • Implement network protocols and analyze its performance.Unit I INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NETWORKS Networking principles; switching - circuit switching, packet switching, frame relay, cell switching, multiple access.Unit II COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK PROTOCOLS Network protocol (syntax, semantics, and timing); Protocol suites (OSI and TCP/IP); Layered protocol software (stacks): Physical layer networking concepts; data link layer concepts; network layer concepts; transport and application layer concepts; Network Standards and standardization bodies.Unit III LOCAL AND WIDE AREA NETWORKS LAN topologies (bus, ring, star), LAN technologies (Ethernet, token Ring, Gigabit Ethernet), Error detection and correction, Carrier sense multiple access networks (CSMA), Large networks and wide areas, Protocols (addressing, congestion control, virtual circuits, quality of service). Internet - addressing, routing, end point control; Internet protocols - IP, TCP, UDP, ICMP, HTTP, CIDRUnit IV ROUTING AND CONGESTION CONTROL ALGORITHMS Flooding; Minimal spanning trees; Bellman Ford, Dijkstras, OSPF, BGP shortest path algorithms; The leaky bucket, floyd warshall and Random Early Detection congestion methods; Data security and integrity: Fundamentals of secure networks; cryptography; Encryption and privacy: Public key, private key, symmetric key; Authentication protocols; Packet filtering; Firewalls; Virtual private networks; Transport layer security.Unit V NETWORK MANAGEMENT AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NETWORKS Overview of the issues of network management; Domain names and name services; Issues for Internet service providers (ISPs); Quality of service issues: performance, failure recovery.Text Books 1. W. Stallings, Data & Computer Communications, Prentice-Hall, 2005. 2. A. S. Tanenbaum, Computer networks, Prentice-Hall,2005. 3. Behrouz A Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, Tata Mc-grawhill, 2007. 4. I. Mitrani, Modelling of Computer and Communication Systems, Cambridge, 1987. 5. J.Walrand and P.Varaiya, High Performance Communication Networks, Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufmann), 2000. 6. J.F.Kurose and K.W.Ross, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet, Pearson Education, 2001. 7. D. E. Comer and D.L. Stevens, Internetworking with TCP/IP, Vol.1, Prentice-Hall
  • 34. Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 35. ITE318 Computer Networks Lab L T P C 0 0 3 2Prerequisite ITE313Objectives • To write programs to configure LAN,WAN • To analyze protocols and their performanceOutcomes Students shall be able to • Implement network protocols and analyze its performance. • Configure Networks.Exercises 1. Write a program to display the server’s date and time details at the client end. 2. Write a program to display the client’s address at the server end. 3. Write a program to implement an echo UDP server. 4. Write a program to develop a simple Chat TCP and UDP application. 5. Write a program to capture each packet and to examine its checksum field. 6. Network layer concepts; to be done with only computer a. Configuration of IP addresses b. Configuration of Subnet mask c. Configuration of Gateway d. Setting up LAN e. Connecting two or more different LAN with different subnet mask f. Making computer to work like router/gateway with the help of IP address 7. Protocol analyzer using ethereal a. Capturing and analyzing Ethernet frames b. HTTP GET/response interaction c. Analysis of ICMP and Ping d. Analysis of ICMP and Traceroute e. Capturing a bulk TCP transfer from your computer to a remote server 8. Additional activities (Optional) a. Compute checksum fields using CRC-12 and examine the same during the frame transmission. b. Implementation of sliding window protocol as part of DLC. c. IPv4 and IPv6 protocol testing and implementation. d. TCP and UDP protocol testing and implementation. e. SNMP implementation f. SMTP implementation g. RSA public key and private key encryption and decryption h. Data compression using Huffman codes.MoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 36. ITE315 Database Systems L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To teach role of data, files and databases in information systems. • To impart knowledge of data modeling techniques. • To provide the fundamentals of front-end and back-end of databasesOutcomes The students will be able to • Understand fundamental concepts of database management system, database modeling, design, SQL, PL/SQL, and system implementation techniques. • Model and implement database applications • Understand transaction processing of DatabasesUnit I DATABASE SYSTEMS History and motivation for database systems; components of database systems; DBMS functions; database architecture and data independence.Unit II DATA MODELING Data modeling; conceptual models; object-oriented model; relational data model.; Database query languages: Overview of database languages; SQL; query optimization; 4th-generation environments; embedding non- procedural queries in a procedural language; introduction to Object Query Language.Unit III RELATIONAL DATABASES Mapping conceptual schema to a relational schema; entity and referential integrity; relational algebra and relational calculus; Relational database design: Database design; functional dependency; normal forms; multivalued dependency; join dependency; representation theory.Unit IV TRANSACTION PROCESSING Transactions; failure and recovery; concurrency controlUnit V PHYSICAL DATABASE DESIGN Storage and file structure; indexed files; hashed files; signature files; b- trees; files with dense index; files with variable length records; database efficiency and tuning.Text Books 1. A. Silberschatz, H. F. Korth & S. Sudershan, Database system concepts, McGraw Hill, 4th Edition 2002. 2. R. Elmasri & S. B. Navathe, Fundamentals of database systems, Addison Wesley, 2005. 3. C. J. Date, An introduction to database systems, Addison Wesley,2003. 4. H. Garcia et al., Database system implementation, Prentice HallReference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 37. ITE316 Database Systems Lab L T P C 0 0 3 2PrerequisiteObjectives • To model data for different applications. • To teach implementation concepts of databases in information systems. • To teach implementation of front-end and back-end of databasesOutcomes The students will be able to • To perform database modeling, design, • To create databases and pose complex SQL queries of relational • Model and implement database applications.Exercises 1. a) Create a table EMP with the following fields. EName Eno. Salary DeptNo Address Dname b) Insert 5 records into EMP c) ALTER EMP table i) varying size of Eno field ii) adding a new field job d) Delete the table EMP 2. Create a table EMP with the above mentioned fields. i) Insert 5 records into EMP ii) Update the salary of the Employees by 10% hike iii) Delete the employees whose name is ‘AAA’ 3. Create a table ORDER with the following fields and constraints. ORDER Column Name Constraint Name Constraint Type Order-no pk-order-no PRIMARY KEY Item-name itn UNIQUE Qty ck-aty CHECK (25<QTY<50) rate-unit Nn-rate NOT NULL 4. Using Ex 3. 1. Drop unique constraint for item-name 2. Disable the constraint Nn-rate 3. Insert a record with NULL values for rate unit 4. Enable the constraint with NULL value existing on rate-unit 5. Create a table EMP mentioned above and test all the arithmetic functions and character functions 6.Add a field date-of-birth to EMP table and test all the date functions. 7. i) Modify EMP table adding a new field BONUS, update it using NVL ii) Retrieve the employees whose name starts with S. iii)Select all the employees who are working in IT department. 8. I) Using EMP table find the employee getting maximum salary ii) Find the employee whose salary is minimum iii) Find the sum of salaries of all the employees working in ‘ACCOUNTS’ department. 9. Create a table DEPT with the following fields DNo. Primary Key DName
  • 38. Modify EMP table adding a foreign key constraint on DeptNo. i) Insert 6 records into Dept. ii) Implement the following Join operations a) Self Join b) Equi Join c) Non Equi Join d) Outer Join e) Natural Join 10. Using EMP and DEPT, implement all type of view techniques. a) Row subset view b) Column subset view c) Row column subset view d) Grouped view e) Joined view f) With check option 11. Using EMP and DEPT a) Create a sequence to insert the empno in EMP table b) Create a synonym for the above two tables PART – B 1. Create a cursor to update the salary of employees in EMP table 2. a) Write a PL/SQL program to raise an Exception i) When the bonus exceeds salary b)Write a PL/SQL program to test the built-in Exceptions 3. Write a procedure to insert a record into ORDER table by validating qty limit of the item and also check whether that item exists. 4. Write a function to find substring. Create a trigger which checks whether employee with Emp_no is present in the Employee table before inserting into EMP. PART – C Development of mini-projects with VB as front-end.MoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 39. Database Administration L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite Database SystemsObjectives • To enable students to understand the basics of different tasks of database administration and to impart knowledge of different types of databasesOutcomes The students will be able to • Understand fundamental concepts of database administration and managing database security. • Model and implement database administration.Unit I Introduction to Database and SQL Server 2000 Client/Server Concept, Types of Databases, Relational Vs. Flat File Database. Background of SQL Server, Versions of SQL Server and Clients Supported by SQL Server. Installation & Configuring SQL Server: Installing SQL Server 2000, Unattended Installations, SQL Server Services. Configuring SQL Server Network Protocol Settings. Installing SQL Server Clients.Unit II SQL Server Tools and Utilities Managing SQL Server with Enterprise Manager, Query Analyser, SQL Server Groups. Tools Menu, Action Menu. Introduction to Transact – SQL(T-SQL)Unit III Managing Database Creating Database, Database File Placement(RAID 0, RAID 1 RAID 5), Creating Database using T-SQL and Enterprise Manager. Altering, Renaming, Dropping Database. Creating Objects in Database: Tables, Views, Constraints, Indexes.Unit IV Managing Security Understanding Security Modes, Windows Authentication Modes, Mixed Mode, SQL Server Logins, Windows Logins, Fixed Server Logins, Creating Users, Database Roles, (Grant,Revoke ,Deny) N-Tier Security. Database Backups and Restore: Copying Database with Copy Database Wizard. SQL Database Backup Modes(Full, Differential, Transactional Log Backup). Backing Up of the Database. Restoring Database. DTS: Its meaning, DTS Packages. DTS Storage and Designer.Text Books 1. David C. Kreines, Brian Laskey,”Oracle Database Administration “, Oreilly Media 2. Craig S Mullins,” Database Administration: The Complete Guide to Practices and Procedures”,Powell’s books 3. Claire Rajan,” Oracle 10g Database Administrator II: Backup/recovery & Network Administration”,by Thomson 4. Sam R. Alapati,” Expert Oracle9i Database Administration”, Apress 5. Dan wood, “Begininig SQL Server 2005 Administration”, Wrox publictionReference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 40. SWE307 Principles of Software Engineering L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To teach the concepts of process, product and project • To elucidate the knowledge of requirement analysis • To provide the knowledge of software design and testing • To introduce the project management techniquesOutcomes The students will be able to • Perform Requirement analysis. • Write Software Requirement Specification. • Model software system • Perform Testing on the developed softwareUnit I FUNDAMENTALS OF SE AND REQUIREMENT ENGINEERING Software Engineering Fundamentals; Software processes: Software life- cycle and process models; Process assessment models; Overview of Project Management activities; Software requirements and specifications: Requirements elicitation; Requirements analysis modeling techniques; Functional and nonfunctional requirements; User requirements, System requirements, requirement validation and software requirement specification document. Prototyping - Basic concepts of formal specification techniques.Unit II SOFTWARE DESIGN Fundamental design concepts and principles; Design characteristics; System Models- Context, Behavioral, Data and, Object models, Architectural design- System structuring, Control models; Structured design; Object-oriented analysis and design; User interface design; Design for reuse; Design patterns;Unit III SOFTWARE VALIDATION AND MAINTENANCE Software validation: Validation planning; Testing fundamentals, including test plan creation and test case generation; Black-box and white-box testing techniques; Unit, integration, validation, and system testing; Object-oriented testing; Inspections. Software evolution: Software maintenance; Characteristics of maintainable software; Reengineering; Legacy systems; Software reuse.Unit IV SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT Team management – Team processes, Team organization and decision- making, Roles and responsibilities in a software team, Role identification and assignment, Project tracking, Team problem resolution; Project planning and scheduling; Software measurement and estimation techniques; Risk analysis and management; Software quality assurance; Software configuration management;.Unit V SOFTWARE QUALITY PROCESS IMPROVEMENT Overview of Quality management and Process Improvement; Overview of SEI-CMM, ISO 9000, CMMI, PCMM, TQM and Six Sigma; overview of CASE tools. Software tools and environments: Programming environments; Project management tools; Requirements analysis and design modeling tools; testing tools; Configuration management tools;Text Books 1. R. S. Pressman, Software Engineering, a practitioner’s approach, McGraw Hill, 2006 2. Ian Sommerville, "Software Engineering", Sixth Edition, Addison-Wesley, 2004Reference Books
  • 41. MoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 42. Graphical User Interface L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE212Objectives • To introduce the concepts of graphical user interfaceOutcomes • The students will be able to use the advantage of graphical capabilities to make the program easier to use.Unit I Introduction Architecture of GUI Applications: Model-GUI Separation, N-Tier Architectures, GUI as Frontend to Transactions (Forms-based GUIs)Unit II GUI Design Patterns Modal Dialog, Inspector (Properties of Selected Element), Wizard (Step- by-Step), Palette/Roll-Up, Explorer (Tree/Table Combination)Unit III GUI Frameworks Java Swing, Microsoft Foundation Classes.Unit IV Components Java Beans, ActiveX Controls.Unit V Development Environments & GUI Builders Principles, Application, Restrictions, Evaluation.Text Books 1. B. Scneiderman, Designing the User Interface, Addison Wesl;ey, IIIed. 2. Susan Weinschenk, GUI Design Essentials. 3. Barfield L, The User Interface: Concepts & Design, AddisonWesley, 1993 4. Cox K & Walker D, User Interface Design, Prentice Hall, 1993 5. Preece, Rodgers, Sharp, Benion, Holland and Carey, Human Computer Interaction, AddisonReference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 43. Multimedia Computing L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE313Objectives • To introduce multimedia computing and communications concepts. • To impart knowledge of Sound/ Audio, video processing techniques.Outcomes • The students will be able to use multimedia computing hardware, software tools, multimedia authoring and design process.Unit I Introduction Overview of Multimedia, Multimedia Objects, Multimedia in business and work. Multimedia hardware, Memory & Storage devices, Communication devices, Multimedia software’sUnit II Multimedia Tools Presentation tools, tools for object generations, video, sound, image capturing, authoring tools, card and page based authoring tools Text, Digital Audio, audio file formats, Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI).Unit III Multimedia application design Multimedia authoring and user interface. Multimedia information networks, distributed multimedia systems, System design methodology and considerations, Multimedia applications.Unit IV Basic compression techniques lossy and lossless compression, compression techniques like Huffman Coding, Shannon Fano Algorithm, Huffman Algorithms, Adaptive Coding, Arithmetic Coding Higher Order Modeling. Finite Context Modeling, Dictionary based Compression, Sliding Window Compression, LZ77, LZW compression, Compression ratio.Unit V Multimedia communication issues Multimedia communication, video conferencing, video-on-demand broadcasting issues, traffic shaping and networking support; Transcoding; Multimedia OS and middleware; Synchronization and QoS; Multimedia servers, databases and content management; Multimedia information system and applications.Text Books 1. Tay Vaughan “Multimedia, Making IT Work” Osborne McGraw Hill. 2. Buford “Multimedia Systems” Addison Wesley. 3. Agrawal & Tiwari “Multimedia Systems” Excel. 4. David Hillman “Multimedia technology and Applications” Galgotia Publications. 5. Rosch “Multimedia Bible” Sams Publishing. 6. Sleinreitz “Multimedia System” Addison Wesley.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 44. Multimedia Computing Lab L T P CPrerequisite ITE414Objectives •OutcomesExercises 1 Create Icons using any of the macromedia tools. 2 Create Logos using any of the macromedia tools. 3 Create a Image and Change the Image using Photoshop 4 Create a Morphing images using any macromedia tools 5 Create animation picture using flash. 6 Manipulate Digital Audio using Sound editing tool. 7 Manipulate Digital Video using Video editing tool. 8 Using Fireworks create a Multimedia presentation. 9 Create a Multimedia Presentation using Flash.MoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 45. ITE215 Human Computer Interaction L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • To introduce the fundamentals of user interface design • To teach of concepts and guidelines of user interfaceOutcomes The students will be able to • Understand the Human Computer Interaction. • Design an effective user interface for software application.Unit I FOUNDATIONS OF HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION Motivation; contexts for HCI (tools, web hypermedia, communication); human centered development and evaluation; human performance models: perception, movement, and cognition; human performance models: culture, communication, and organizations; accommodating human diversity; principles of good design and good designers; engineering tradeoffs; introduction to usability testing.Unit II HUMAN-CENTERED SOFTWARE EVALUATION Setting goals for evaluation; evaluation without users: walkthroughs, KLM, guidelines, and standards; evaluation with users: usability testing, interview, survey, experiment.Unit III HUMAN-CENTERED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT Approaches, characteristics, and overview of process; functionality and usability: task analysis, interviews, surveys; specifying interaction and presentation; prototyping techniques and tools – paper storyboards, Inheritance and dynamic dispatch, Prototyping languages and GUI builders.Unit IV GRAPHICAL USER-INTERFACE DESIGN Principles of graphical user interfaces, GUI toolkits; Choosing interaction styles and interaction techniques; HCI aspects of common widgets; HCI aspects of screen design: layout, color, fonts, labeling; handling human failure; beyond simple screen design: visualization, representation, metaphor; multi-modal interaction: graphics, sound, and haptics; 3D interaction and virtual reality.Unit V HCI ASPECTS OF MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS Categorization and architectures of information : hierarchies, hypermedia; information retrieval and human performance – Web search, Usability of database query language, Graphics, Sound; HCI design of multimedia information systems; speech recognition and natural language processing; information appliances and mobile computing.Text Books 1. Ben Schneiderman, “Designing the User Interface ", Addison Wesley, 2000. 2. Jacob Nielsen, “Usability Engineering ", Academic Press, 1993. 3. Alan Dix et al, “Human - Computer Interaction ", Prentice Hall, 1993. 4. Alan Cooper, “The Essentials of User Interface Design ", IDG Books, 1995.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 46. Wireless and Mobile Computing L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE219Objectives • To introduce the concepts of wireless and mobile computing technologies and to impart the knowledge about the technologies like CDMA, GSM, GPRS and Wireless Application protocols.Outcomes • The student would be able to understand the principles and practices of Mobile Communication, Satellite Communication, Medium Access Control techniques, Mobile Devices, Wireless Local Area Networks, HiperLAN and Bluetooth, Wireless ATM operations, mobile network layer and various wireless Application Protocol.Unit I Overview Introduction to wireless technology, comparison of wired and wireless mechanism, introduction to mobile computing, various types of wireless communication technologies used in Mobiles, Antennas etc. Concept of spread spectrum, various types of spread spectrum, spreading sequences.Unit II Current Wireless Systems Overview of Paging Systems, Cordless Phones, Cellular Telephone Systems, Satellite Communication, Wireless LANs, Bluetooth. Modern Wireless Communication Systems.Unit III Wireless networks Introduction to wireless networking, cellular, wireless networks, TDMA, CDMA, working of a cordless system, wireless local loops.Unit IV Mobile and wireless access protocols Introduction to Mobile-IP, wireless access protocols, various types of wireless LAN technologies like infrared, microwave LANs etc. , Introduction to VoIP, wireless VoIP solution, procedures, message flow etc., Introduction to WAP, WAP protocols.Unit V IEEE standards IEEE standards for wireless LANs, various types of Blue tooth specifications and protocols.Text Books 1. “Wireless Communication and Networks” by William Stallings, 1st edition. 2. “Wireless and Mobile Network Architectures” by Yi-Bing Lin and Imrich Chlamtac 3. Principles of mobile computing Hansmann & Merk., Springer. 4. Mobile Communications Handbook by Jerry D. Gybson. 5. Mobile Communications Handbook by Raymond Steel.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzes.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 47. ITE413 Network Administration L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE323Objectives • To cover various aspects of networks system administration such as plan and design of an efficient community of computers, tools and systems for monitoring and managing network systems.Outcomes • The students would be able to understand and use various principles and practices of managing and administering networked systems.Unit I INTRODUCTION Introduction, System Components, Networked Communities, Host Management, User ManagementUnit II MODELS OF NETWORK & SYSTEM ADMINISTRATION Configuration and Maintenance, Diagnostics, Fault & Change Management. SNMP Overview, Installing, Using & Maintaining SNMP ToolsUnit III SERVICES Application Level Services, Network Level Services, Principles of Security, Security Implications, Analytical System AdministrationUnit IV OPEN SOURCE TOOTS FOR NETWORK ADMINISTRATION Open Source and Network Administration, Open Source Tools, Environment & Background, Terminology & Conventions, Overview of Service Monitoring, Installing, Using, Configuring & Maintaining SysmonUnit V NETWORK MANAGEMENT Overview of Open Source Tools for Network Administration – MRTG, Neo, NetFlow, Oak, Tcpdump; Over view of Basic TCP/IP tools - Ping, Telnet, Netcat, Traceroute, MTR, Netstat; Over view of Custom Tools - Basics of Scripting, Bourne Shell, Programming Monitors, Running Programs from Cron.Text Books 1. Mark Burgess, "Principles of Network and System Administration", John Wiley & Sons, 2004 2. Mani Subramanian, “Network Management – Principles & Practice”, Pearson Education, 2003. 3. Behrouz A Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking, Tata Mc-grawhill, 2007. 4. J.Walrand and P.Varaiya, High Performance Communication Networks, Harcourt Asia (Morgan Kaufmann), 2000. 5. J.F.Kurose and K.W.Ross, Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach Featuring the Internet, Pearson Education, 2001.Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzes.Recommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 48. ITE414 Network Administration Lab L T P C 0 0 3 2Prerequisite ITE413Objectives •OutcomesExercises 1. SNMP- Simple Network Management Protocol Tools Query a variable and view the response Set a variable and determine if it was successful Query entire tables with get-next-request Receive traps 2. MRTG - Multi Router Traffic Grapher View the traffic patterns of one or more networks at once Determine if one or more is experiencing an abnormal traffic load. View history of the network available and look for sudden changes that might account for a problem. Understand how traffic is distributed across the network, suggest plan capacity needs for the future 3. Neo - Bandwidth Monitoring Tool Check bandwidth usage or determine on which switch port a particular host resides Use remote login session and check bandwidth Find the host and disable its network 4. NetFlow - Flow Monitoring Tool Receive flows, send to stdout Receive flows, store to disk Print flow data to the screen Produce flow reports for other programs Print flow statistics to the screen Detect suspicious network traffic Send flow data in NetFlow format Generate test flow data Import/Export data from/to other NetFlow tools 5. Oak - Message Log Management Tool Examines a message log in syslog format Set up to ignore unimportant messages Condense redundant information Produce reports of important messages Notify operators immediately of critical messages 6. Packet level debugging using Tcpdump Ping Telnet Netcat, Traceroute MTRMoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval by
  • 49. the AcademicCouncil
  • 50. Cryptography and Network L T P C Security 3 0 0 3Prerequisite Network AdministrationObjectives • To tech various message encryption and decryption technique. • To provide the fundamentals of network security.Outcomes The students will be able to • Perform encryption and decryption. • Understand mechanisms of network security.Unit I INTRODUCTION Introduction to Security attacks, services And mechanisms, Introduction to cryptology, Cryptanalysis, Conventional Encryption model, classical encryption techniques-substitution ciphers & transposition ciphers, cryptanalysis, stereography, stream & block ciphers, Public key and private key cryptography.Unit II MODERN BLOCK CIPHER Block Ciphers principles, Standards (DES), Strength of DES, Differential & Linear Cryptanalysis of DES, Block cipher model of operation, triple DES, IDEA encryption & decryption, Strength of IDES, Confidentiality using conventional encryption, traffic confidentiality, key distribution, random number generation.Unit III PRINCIPLE OF PUBLIC KEY CRYPTOGRAPHY principle of public key cryptography, prime and relative prime numbers, modular arithmetic, RSA algorithm, security of RSA key management. Authentication recruitments, Authentications functions, and Message Authentication codes, Digital Signatures- Merkle-Hellman Knapsack public key cipher, authentication protocols ,Digital signatures Standard ,proof of digital signatures algorithm.Unit IV SYSTEM SECURITY Backups - Protecting against programmed threats, intruders, threats, viruses and worms - Physical security - Personnel security. Security issues in OS, Trusted Systems, Fire walls - Firewall Design Principles, Trusted Systems.Unit V NETWORK SECURITY Authentication applications - Kerberos, X.509 Directory Authentication Service, Electronic Mail Security - Pretty Good Privacy, S/MIME, IP Security - IP Security Architecture, Combining Security Associations, Key Management, Web Security - Web Security Requirements, Secure Socket Layer and Transport Layer Security, Secure Electronic Transaction, SSH.Text Books 1. WILLIAM STALLINGS, "Cryptography and Network Security – Principles and Practice", 4/E, Pearson Education, 2000 2 . B. A. Forouzan, Cryptography and Network Security, McGraw Hill, 1st Ed. 3. Johannes A Buchmann, “Introduction to cryptography,” 2/E,Spiringer–verlag, 2004 4. C. P. Fleeger and S. L. Fleeger, Security in Computing, 3/E, Pearson Education, 2003. 5. Mano W., Modern Cryptography: Theory & Practice, Pearson Education, 2004Reference BooksMoE Written examinations, seminar, assignments, surprise tests and quizzesRecommended by theBoard of Studies onDate of Approval bythe Academic Council
  • 51. MEE101 Engineering Graphics L T P C 0 0 4 2PrerequisiteObjectives • To create an awareness and emphasise the need for Engineering Graphics. • To teach basic drawing standards and conventions. • To develop skills in three-dimensional visualization of engineering components. • To develop an understanding of 2D and 3D drawings using the Solidworks software.Outcomes On completion of this course, the students will be able to • prepare drawings as per standards (BIS). • solve specific geometrical problems in plane geometry involving lines, plane figures and special curves. • produce orthographic projection of engineering components working from pictorial drawings. • Prepare 2D Drawings using the Solidworks software. Introduction to engineering graphics – geometrical construction – conics and special curves – free hand sketching – dimensioning principles – orthographic projection – projection of points, lines and solids in simple position only – detailed views of simple 3D objects.Text Books 1.N.D. Bhatt (1998), Engineering Drawing, Charotar Publishing House. 2.French and Vierk (2002), Fundamentals of Engineering Drawing, McGraw-Hill. 3.K.V. Natarajan (2006), Engineering Graphics, Dhanalakshmi Publishers. 4.CAD Manual prepared by VIT Faculty.Reference BooksMoE Assignments, exercises and examinations.Recommended by theBoard of Studies onDate of Approval bythe Academic Council
  • 52. MEE102 Workshop Practice – I L T P C 0 0 2 1PrerequisiteObjectives • To train the students in handling tools, equipment and machinery with safety. • To impart skill in fabricating simple components using sheet metal. • To cultivate safety aspects in handling of tools and equipment.Outcomes On completion of this course, the students will be able to • welding and soldering operations. • fabrication of simple sheet metal parts.Exercises WELDING EXERCISES •Introduction to BI Standards and reading of welding drawings. •Butt Joint •Lap Joint •TIG Welding •MIG Welding SHEET METAL EXERCISES •Making of Cube •Making of Cone using development of surface. •Making of control panel using development of surface. SOLDERING EXERCISES •Soldering and desoldering of resistor in PCB. •Soldering and desoldering of IC in PCB. •Soldering and desoldering of capacitor in PCB. BOSCH TOOLS DEMONSTRATION •Demonstration of all Bosch tools. •Introduction to TIG, MIG welding. •Aluminum welding - submerged and arc welding, wave soldering.MoERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 53. ITE103 Data Structures and Algorithms L T P C 3 1 0 4Prerequisite ITE101Objectives • To understand pointer concept in C and related library functions • To study linear and non-linear data structures • To master sorting and searching techniques and study their efficienciesOutcomes Understanding of data structures, pointers in C, and algorithmsUnit 1 Introduction to Algorithm Analysis 12 Algorithmic Analysis – Algorithmic notation, Space-time analysis of an algorithm – Notations for algorithmic analysis – Examples for algorithm analysis – Fundamental algorithms, Factoring methods, Pattern searchingUnit 2 Linear Data Structures 9 Array of structures – Stacks, Application of stacks – Queues, Application of queues – Simulation – Priority queuesUnit 3 Linked Data Structures 9 Review of pointers – Pointers and linked allocation – Linked lists, Circular lists, Linked implementation of Stack and QueueUnit 4 Sorting and Searching 11 Selection sort, Bubble sort, Insertion sort, Quick sort, Shell sort, Merge short, Radix sort, Heap sort – Searching techniques: Sequential search, Binary search, Hash table methods – Hashing functions – Sorting and Searching efficienciesUnit 5 Non-linear Data Structures 9 Trees – Binary Tree, Tree traversals, Expression and search trees, AVL Tree - Graphs and their representation: BFS, DFS– Shortest Path Algorithms – Dijkstras Algorithm – Concept of algorithm designText Books 1. Jean Paul Tremblay and Paul G. Sorenson, An introduction to data structures with applications 2nd edition, Tata McGraw-Hill, 2001 2. Gilberg and Ferouzan, Data Structures using C, Pearson Education 2004 3. L. Kruse, et al, Data Structures and Program Design in C, PHIReferences 1. Sartaj Sahni, Data structures, Algorithms and Applications in Java, McG-Hill 2. Robert Sedgewick, Algorithms in C++, Third edition, Addison Wesley 3. John R.Hubbard, Schaum’s Outline of Theory and Problems of Data Structure with C++, McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 2000MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 54. ITE104 Data Structures and Algorithms Lab L T P C 0 0 3 2PrerequisiteObjectives • To use pointers in C programs • To practice linear and non-linear data structures programs • To code and understand sorting and searching techniquesOutcomes Implementation of algorithms and data structures, sorting and searchingExercises 1.Programs using dynamically allocated 1-, 2-, 3-D arrays - using pointers 2.Creation and manipulation of binary files and text files 3.Implementing string-handling functions 4.Implementing stack using array and linked list 5.Implementing queue using array and linked list 6.Coding for priority queue 7.Defining binary tree and using it for different operations 8.Creating linked list structure and coding insertion, deletion, and reading of items 9.Coding to create a graph and writing functions for traversals, detection, and implementation of Dijikstra’s algorithm 10. Coding for merge-sort of two files data 11. Sorting file records by quicksort 12. Developing stack data structure for expression conversion and ‘Towers of Hanoi’ 13. Implementing sorting algorithms 14. Implementing searching algorithms – linear and binary 15. Developing hash data structure and testing for various operationsMoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 55. ITE211 Programming in Java L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE201Objectives • To learn Java language syntax and programming with Java • To do O-O programming with Java and Exception Handling • To learn making use of packages and interfaces • To code GUI programsOutcomes Programming application with Java programming languageUnit 1 Java Programming Language 10 Introduction To Java: Features Of Java – Application – Java Programming Structure – Data Types – Tokens – Keywords – Operators – Constants – Statements – Simple Java Program – Execution Environment – Garbage CollectionUnit 2 OOP with Java – I 8 Preview Of Oops Concepts - Class – Objects – Methods – Nested Class – Constructor – finalizer – Access Control -I/O Streams – String – String Buffer – Vector – Wrapper Class – static – final – this KeywordUnit 3 OOP with Java – II 9 Inheritance: Types Of Inheritance – Polymorphism – Method Overloading – super – Method Overriding – Exception Handling – File and I/O StreamsUnit 4 Interfaces, Packages and Threads 9 Java Interfaces, Packages, And Threads: Interfaces – Interface Design – Packages – Package Hierarchy – Threads Programming And Handling – Multi-Thread ProgrammingUnit 5 GUI Programming 9 Java GUI: Basic elements of AWT - Applet programming – Basic elements of Swing – Front-end design –– Events Handling – Basics of JDBCText Books 1. The Java Programming Language 3e, Ken Arnold, James Gosling, David Holmes, A-W 2. Core Java Vol I – Fundamental, CS. Horstmann, G. Cornell, Sun 3. Beginning Java 2/5, Ivor Horton, WroxReferences 1. Java The Complete Reference 4e, P. Naughton, H. Schildt, Tata McGraw-Hill 2. http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial 3. Java How to Program, Deitel & Deitel, PH-India 4. Professional Java, Richarson, et al, Wrox 5. Core Swing Advanced Programming, Kim Topley, PearsonMoE Continuous Assessment Test, Quiz, Assignment, and TEERecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 56. ITE212 Java Programming Lab L T P C 0 0 4 2Prerequisite ITE211Objectives • To learn Java syntax and programming • To code in Java simple and intermediate programs • To understand OOP with Java • To program using threads, interfaces, and packages • To develop GUI and AppletOutcomes OOP with JavaExercises 1. Programs on Basic Elements of Java language 2. Programs on Operators and I/O Streams 3. Programs on Control Flow – Decision, Branch, Loop 4. Programs to handle strings and string buffer 5. Programs on Exception Handling 6. Program designs on OOP in Java – classes, methods, overloading, extended classes, inheritance, polymorphism, etc 7. GUI Design with AWT and Swing 8. Programs on Applet Programming and Event Handling 9. Programs Development with Interfaces, Threads, Packages 10. Multi-threaded Programming 11. Programs design for accessing databases 12. 2-tier and 3-tier software developmentMoE CAT, Coding Practice, Observation Book, On-the-spot Exercises, and TEERecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 57. EIT201 Digital Electronics and L T P C Microprocessors 3 0 0 3Prerequisite EEE101Objectives • To learn logic circuits and converters • To introduce the components of a digital system • To understand microprocessor architecture and assembler instruction formatsOutcomes Understanding digital electronics and circuits, computers and microprocessorsUnit 1 Combinational Logic Circuits 10 Review of number systems - Logic gates: NAND, NOR gate as universal building blocks - Simplification of four-variable Boolean equations using Karnaugh maps - Half adder, Full adder, Half subtractor, Full subtractor - 4-bit parallel adder and subtractor - 3-bit binary decoder - Decimal to BCD encoder – 8-to-1 multiplexer, 1-to-8 DemultiplxerUnit 2 Sequential Logic Circuits 8 Flip-flops: SR flip-flop, Edge-triggered flip-flops (SR,D,JK and T), Master-slave JK flip- flop - 4-bit binary asynchronous and synchronous counter - Decade counter (asynchronous and synchronous) - Shift registers (SISO,SIPO,PISO,PIPO) - Ring counter – Memories (RAM, ROM, EPROM, FLASH)Unit 3 D/A and A/D Converters 9 Ladder type D/A converter - Dual slope A/D converter - Successive approximation A/D converter - Study of DAC0800 and ADC0809 chipsUnit 4 The 8086 Microprocessor Architecture and Instruction Set 11 Pin diagram - CPU architecture - Memory segmentation - Internal operations - Addressing modes - Instruction formats - Assembler instruction formats: Data transfer instructions, Arithmetic instructions, Logical instructions, Branch-and-loop instructions – Interrupts: Software and Hardware interrupts, Software interrupt programmingUnit 5 Peripheral Chips 7 8255 (PPI), 8254 (Timer), 8257 (DMA), 8259 (PIC), 8251 (USART)Text Books 1. Thomas L Floyd, Digital Fundamentals, Universal Books, New Delhi 2. Douglas V. Hall, Microprocessors and Interfacing, TMHReferences 1. Yu-Cheng Liu, Glenn A. Gibson, Microcomputer Systems: The 8086/8088 Family, PHI 2. Barry B. Brey, Microprocessors and Peripherals, CBS Publishers & Distributors, Delhi 3. R.K. Gaur, Digital Electronics and MicrocomputersMoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 58. EIT202 Digital Electronics and L T P C Microprocessors Lab 0 0 4 2Prerequisite EIT201Objectives • To understand logic gates and circuits • To design sequential and combinational circuits • To program microprocessors for simple math functions • To program microprocessors for data sorting and moving • To design interfacesOutcomes • Designing digital electronics components • Programming microprocessorsExercises I. Digital Electronics 1. Study of Logic Gates • Logic gates using discrete components • Verification of truth table for AND, OR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XOR gates • Realization of NAND and NOR gates 2. Implementation of Logic Circuits • Verification of Boolean laws • Verification of DeMorgan’s law 3. Adder and Subtractor • Implementation of Half-Adder and Full-Adder • Implementation of Half-Subtractor and Full-Subtractor 4. Combinational Circuit Design • Design of Decoder and Encoder • Design of Code Converter • Design of multiplexers and de multiplexers 5. Sequential Circuit Design • Implementation of Shift registers, Serial Transfer • Ring Counter • 4-bit Binary Counter • BCD Counter II. Microprocessors 6. Study of 8086, 8255, 8253, 8279, 8259 7. ALP Arithmetic programming a) Write an ALP to find out factorial of a given hexadecimal number using 8086 MP Data: OAH, OFH, 1OH b) Write an ALP to perform 16 bit arithmetic operations (ADD, SUB, MUL, DIV) c) Write an ALP to generate the sum of first ‘N’ natural numbers using 8086 MP d) Write an ALP to convert given hexadecimal number to binary using 8086 MP Data: ABH, CDH, 101H 8. Number system conversion Write an ALP to convert given binary number to hexadecimal number using 8086 MP Data: 101010102, 111111112, 11002, 11112 9. Sorting and Data Movement a) Write an ALP to order give set of hexadecimal numbers in ascending and descending order Data: 0AH, 0FH, 0DH, 10H, 02H b) Write an ALP to move block of data from locations 1200H-1205H to 2200H – 2205H c) Write an ALP to reverse the given string Data: WELCOME d) Write an ALP to generate the following series 1+1/x+1/x3+1/x5+ …….. 10. Wave generator a) Write an ALP to generate square wave using 8255 PPI b) Write an ALP to generate rate generator using 8253 PIT 11. Keyboard interfacing
  • 59. a) Write an ALP to interface keyboard with 8086 using 8279 PKI b) Write an ALP to display the given message using 8279 PKI Message: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY c) Write an ALP to interface analog to digital converter.MoE CAT, Design Practice, Reports, Observation Book, TEERecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 60. ITE411 Computer Graphics and Multimedia L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE313Objectives • To study the graphics techniques and algorithms. • To study the multimedia concepts and various I/O technologies. • To enable the students to develop their creativityOutcomesUnit 1 OUTPUT PRIMITIVES 12 Introduction - Line - Curve and Ellipse Algorithms – Attributes – Two-Dimensional Geometric Transformations – Two-Dimensional ViewingUnit 2 THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONCEPTS 9 Three-Dimensional Object Representations – Three-Dimensional Geometric and Modeling Transformations – Three-Dimensional Viewing – Color models – AnimationUnit 3 MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS DESIGN 9 An Introduction – Multimedia applications – Multimedia System Architecture – Evolving technologies for Multimedia – Defining objects for Multimedia systems – Multimedia Data interface standards – Multimedia Databases.Unit 4 MULTIMEDIA FILE HANDLING 11 Compression & Decompression – Data & File Format standards – Multimedia I/O technologies - Digital voice and audio – video image and animation – Full motion video – Storage and retrieval Technologies.Unit 5 HYPERMEDIA 9 Multimedia Authoring & User Interface – Hypermedia messaging - Mobile Messaging – Hypermedia message component – creating Hypermedia message – Integrated multimedia message standards – Integrated Document management – Distributed Multimedia Systems.Text Books 1. Donald Hearn and M.Pauline Baker, “Computer Graphics C Version”, Pearson Education, 2003. (UNITI : Chapters1 to 6;UNIT2:Chapter9 – 12, 15, 16) 2. Prabat K Andleigh and Kiran Thakrar, “Multimedia Systems and Design”, PHI, 2003.(UNIT3to5)References 1. Judith Jeffcoate, “Multimedia in practice technology and Applications”, PHI,1998. 2. Foley, Vandam, Feiner, Huges, “Computer Graphics: Principles & Practice”, PearsonEducation,secondedition2003.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 61. Resource Management L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The students would be able to understand and use concepts of OR, such as Linear programming, dynamic programming. They would be able to solve Inventory, maintenance and replacement problems.OutcomesUnit 1 Concept of OR 12 Concept and scope of operations research (OR) – Development of OR – phase of OR – Models in OR. Linear Programming-Methods of solution – graphical and SIMPLEX methods of solution VARIATIONS – duality in LP – revised SIMPLEX method – applications for business and industrial problem.Unit 2 Integer Programming 9 Formulation – graphical representation – Gomory’s cutting plane method, Transportation and Assignment Problem- Initial solution – methods of improving the initial solution – traveling salesman problem – dynamic programming – principle of optimality.Unit 3 Sequencing and Scheduling Problems 9 Job sequencing – ‘n’ jobs through two machines, two jobs through ‘m’ machines and ‘n’ jobs through ‘m’ machines. PERT & CPM Techniques – critical path – normal and crash time – resource allocation – resource leveling and smoothing.Unit 4 Inventory Problems 11 Deterministic model – costs decision variables – economic order quality – instantaneous and non-instantaneous receipt of goods with and without shortage – quality discount – probabilistic inventory model – inventory systems – safety stock – reorder level (ROL), reorder point (ROP) determination.Unit 5 Maintenance and Replacement Problems 9 Models for routine maintenance and preventive maintenance decisions – replacement models that deteriorate with time and those fail completely.Text Books 1. Taha. H.A. “Operation Research- An Introduction”, Macmillan, 2000.References 1. Sharma. S.D., “Operation Research”, Keder Nath Ram Nath & co., 1989. 2. Billy. B. Gillet “Introduction to Operation Research”, Tata McGraw Hill 1982. 3. S. Hamblin & Stevens Jr. “Operation Research”, McGraw Hill Co., 1974.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 62. ITE314 L T P C Object Oriented Analysis and Design 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE201Objectives • The students would be able to understand the techniques, applications and UML based object oriented analysis and design.OutcomesUnit 1 Complexity of software 12 Structure of complex systems, decomposing complexity, Designing complex systems, Object Model: Evolution, Elements of object model, Applying object modelUnit 2 Elements of Notation 9 Class diagrams, state transition diagrams, object diagrams, Interaction diagrams, module diagrams, process diagrams, applying the notation. Principles, micro development process, macro development process.Unit 3 Management and planning 9 Staffing, Release management, Reuse, Quality Assurance and Metrics, Documentation, Tools, Benefits and Risks of Object Oriented developmentUnit 4 Introduction to Object-Oriented Paradigm and UML 11 Unified Process, the Requirement Workflow, Object-Oriented Analysis Workflow, Object- Oriented Design Workflow, Workflow and phases of the Unified process.Unit 5 Analysis and Design 9 Case studies, Teams, Testing, Management Issues, Planning and Estimating, Maintenance, User Interface system, Introduction to Web – Based SystemsText Books 1. Grady Booch, "Object Oriented Analysis and Design with applications", Addison Wesley, 1994.References 2. Schach, Stephen R., "An Introduction to Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design with UML and the Unified Process", Tata McGraw Hill, 2003.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 63. ITE103 Mobile Communication L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE219Objectives • The student would be able to understand the principles and practices of Mobile Communication, Satellite Communication, Medium Access Control techniques, Mobile Devices, Wireless Local Area Networks, HiperLAN and Bluetooth, Wireless ATM operations, mobile network layer and various wireless Application Protocol.OutcomesUnit 1 Introduction 12 Wireless Transmission –Frequencies for Radio transmission –signals-Antennas –Signal propagation –multiplexing Modulation-Spread spectrum –Cellular systemsUnit 2 Communication Systems 9 Medium access control-Motivation for a specialized MAC SDMA-FDMA-TDMA-CDMA- comparison of S/T/F/CDMA. Telecommunication Systems –GSM, DECT, TETRA, UMTS and IMT - 2000, Satellite Systems –GEO139, LEO139, MEO140. Routing, Localization, Handover. Broadcast systems Overview –Cyclic Repetition of Data Digital Audio Broadcasting –Digital Video Broadcasting.Unit 3 Wireless Communication 9 Wireless LAN-Infrared vs. Radio transmission, Infrastructure and ad hoc networks, IEEE802.11, HIPERLAN, Bluetooth. Wireless ATM, Motivation for WATM, Wireless ATM working group, WATM Services, Reference Model, Functions, Radio Access Layer: Handover, Location Management, Addressing, Mobile quality of service, Access point control protocol.Unit 4 Mobile Network Layer 11 Mobile IP-Dynamic host configuration protocol-Ad hoc networks. Mobile transport layer- Traditional TCP292: Indirect TCP, Snooping TCP. Mobile TCP: Fast Retransmit/Fast recovery, transmission/Timeout Freezing, Selective Retransmission, Transaction oriented TCPUUnit 5 Support for Mobility 9 File Systems-Consistency –World Wide Web – Hyper Text mark up language (HTML) – approaches that might help wireless access-System architecture –Wireless Application Protocol.Text Books 1. Johchen schiller, “Mobile Communication”, Addison Wesley, 2000.References 1. Asoke K. Talukder, Roopa R.Yavagal, “Mobile Computing-Technology, Applications and Service Creation”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2005.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 64. Internet Components and L T P C Programming 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE311Objectives • The students shall be able to understand and use the markup languages, scripting languages such as VB Script, Java Script, to access remote databases using XML and ASP.OutcomesUnit 1 History of Internet 12 internet connection concepts, net and its features, e-mail, news groups, FTP, Telnet, Gopher, Domain Name systems, DNS servers, Internet services, accounts.Unit 2 Markup Languages 9 Introduction to HTML, common tags, Headers, text styling, linking, images, special characters, lists, tables, META, FRAMESET tags, JavaScript, Introduction to scripting, operators, control structures, functions, arrays objects.Unit 3 DHTML 9 Client side scripting, with VBscript, operators, data types and control structures, VBscript functions, arrays, string manipulations, classes and objects, E-commerce and security; introduction, shopping cart technology, online auction, trading case study, other E-business, security, commerce server, E-commerce core technologies, internet marketing.Unit 4 Active Server Pages 11 Introduction, ASP working, Client side vs. server side scripting, server side Active X components, File system objects, session tracking and cookies, accessing a database from ASP pages.Unit 5 XML 9 Introduction, structuring data, document type definition, customized markup languages, XML parsers, using XML with HTML, Extensible style language (XSL), Microsoft schemaText Books 1. Deitel, Deitel & Nietro, "Internet and World Wide Web – How to program", Pearson Education, 2005.References 1. Margaret Levine Young, "Internet – The Complete Reference", TMH, 2004. 2. Valerie Quercia, "Internet in a Nutshell", O’Reily publishers, 2004. 3. Alfred Glass Brermer, "Internet 101 Computing", TMH 1995. 4. Active Server Pages 3.0 – Wrox publisher, 2000.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 65. Internet Components and L T P C Programming Lab 0 0 4 2Prerequisite ITE325ObjectivesOutcomesExercises 1. Create a personal home page using HTML 2. Design an E-greetings page which has properly aligned paragraphs with images along with it. 3. Implement a Web site for Information Technology department Using a) Frameset b) Tables c) Internal Linking d) Headers e) List Items f) Hyperlink for mailing 4. Using STYLE SHEETS: 1 .Set the Background Image Fixed and Foreground Scrolling 2. Set the Background Image without tiles and at the center of the screen. 3. Set the Background Color for the text using all the 4 methods of Style sheets 5. Using JavaScript create a web page for Online Testing (Quantitative Aptitude) 6. Develop a JavaScript program to get Register Number as Input and print the Student’s total mark and grades. 7. Develop a VBScript code to perform the functions of a Calculator. 8. Using VBScript, develop a web site for online counseling. 9. Create a Text Editor using VBScript. 10. Write a function that takes an integer value and returns the number with its digits reversed. For Ex. Given the number 7631, the function should return 1367. Incorporate the function into a VBScript that reads a value from the user. Display the result in the status bar of the browser window. 11. Create a server-side include file containing the AdRotator code to display 4 advertisements. 12. Create an ASP application that allows the user to customize a web page. The application should consist of three ASP files: Ask the user to login & read from a database to determine if the user is known. If the user is not known, second ASP file is loaded asking the user to choose their preference for foreground color, background color & image. Insert the new user & pREFERENCE to the database. Display the page customized according to the pREFERENCE selected. If the user is known at login, the customized page should be displayed. 13. Create an ASP application to display the students information from the Database. Note: Only 5 student’s information per page should be displayed. Use Previous & Next to retrieve the rest of the information.
  • 66. ITE323 L T P C Network Programming 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE213Objectives • The students shall be able to learn JAVA programming to share data across Internet for File transfer, Software updates etc., and accomplish many Network programming tasks.OutcomesUnit 1 Introduction 12 Why networked Java What can a network program do, Security Basic network concepts: Networks, The layers of a network, IP,TCP and UDP, The Internet, The client/server model, Internet Standards, Basic Web concepts: URLs, HTML, SGML, and XML, HTTP,MIME Media types, Server Side Programs.Unit 2 Threads 9 Running Threads, Returning Information from a Thread, Synchronization, Deadlock, Thread scheduling, Thread pools, Looking Up Internet Addresses: The InetAddress Class,Inet4Address and Inet6Address,The Network Interface Class, Some useful programs, URLs: The URL class, URL encoder and URL decoder Classes, URL class, Proxies, communicating with Server Side Programs Through GET, Accessing Password- Protected Sites.Unit 3 Sockets for Clients 9 Socket Basics, Investigating Protocols with Telnet, The Socket Class, Socket Exceptions, Socket Addresses, Examples, Sockets For Servers: The Server Socket Class, Some Useful Servers, Secure Sockets: Secure Communications, Creating Secure Client Sockets, Methods of SSLSocket Class, Creating Secure Server Sockets, Methods of the SSLServerSocket Class.Unit 4 UDP Datagrams and Sockets 11 The UDP protocol, The Datagram Packet Class, The Datagram Socket Class, Some useful Applications, Datagram Channel, URLConnections: Opening URL Connections, Reading Data from a server, Reading the Header, Configuring the Connection, Configuring the Client Request HTTP Header, Writing Data to a server, Content Handlers, The Object Methods, Security Considerations for URLConnections, Guessing MIME Content Types, HttpURLConnection, Caches, JAR URLConnection.Unit 5 Remote Method Invocation 9 What is RMI? Implementation, Loading Classes at Runtime, the java.rmi Package, the java.rmi.registry Package, the java.rmi.server Package, The JavaMailAPI: What are Java Mail API, Sending Email, Receiving Email, Password Authentication, Addresses, The URLName Class, The Message Class, the Path Interface, Multipath Messages and File Attachments, MIME messages, Folders.Text Books 1. Elliotte Rusty Harold “JAVA Network Programming” 3rd Edition published by Sharoff Publishers and Distributors Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai, 2005.References 1. David Reilly, Michael Reilly. "Java Network Programming & Distributed Computing", Published by Addison-Wesley. ISBN: 0201710374MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Boardof Studies onDate ofApproval bythe AcademicCouncil
  • 67. ITE324 Networking Lab L T P C 0 0 4 2Prerequisite ITE324ObjectivesOutcomesExercises 1. Write a program to display the server’s date and time details at the client end. 2. Write a program to display the client’s address at the server end. 3. Write a program to implement an echo UDP server. 4. Write a program to develop a simple Chat application. 5. The message entered in the client is sent to the server and the server encodes the message and returns it to the client. Encoding is done by replacing a character by the character next to it i.e. a as b, b as c …z as a. This process is done using the TCP/IP protocol. Write a program for the above 6. The message entered in the client is sent to the server and the server encodes the message and returns it to the client. Encoding is done by replacing a character by the character next to it i.e. a as b, b as c …z as a. This process is done using UDP. Write a program for the above 7. Write a program to display the name and address of the computer that we are currently working on. 8. Write a program to capture each packet and to examine its checksum field. 9. Write a program to create a daemon process. 10. A server should run for 10 secs and generate numbers continuously. The client connecting to it should read data and find out the sum of the data thus read. Write a Java program to implement this scenario. 11. Write graphical user interface for the sales database which lists all the customer names in one choice box and all products in another. When the user selects a customer name and product and press the “submit” button, display a list with the customer name, product, quantity, and date of order by the customer with the name of that product. Use prepared statements whenever possible. 12. Design and populate a database for a car rental system. Allow the client to check the availability of a category of car and to make reservation. 13. Write program to illustrate the following: i). Remote object interaction. ii). File downloading and uploading.
  • 68. ITE416 L T P C Data Warehousing and Data Mining 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE315Objectives • To make familiar with the various concepts of data warehousing like meta data, data mart, summary table, fact data and dimension data. To sail along with the various approaches in data mining. To familiarize with the various data warehousing and data mining toolsOutcomesUnit 1 Data Warehouse and OLAP Technology for Data mining 12 Introduction to Data Warehouse- A multidimensional Data Model – Data Warehouse architecture – Data preprocessing- Data cleaning – Data integration and Transformation.Unit 2 Data Mining Introduction 9 Introduction to Data Mining – Data Mining Functionalities – Classification of Data Mining systems, Major issues in Data mining.Unit 3 Data Mining primitives, languages & system architecture 9 Data Mining primitives: Task – relevant data – kind of knowledge to be mined – Background knowledge – interestingness measures– presentation & visualization of discovered pattern - Data Mining Query language – Designing Graphical User interfaces based on DMQL - Architecture of Data mining.Unit 4 Association Rule Mining 11 Basic concepts – market basket analysis - Mining single dimensional Boolean association rules from transactional databases. Classification & prediction: What’s classification - issues regarding classification and prediction – Bayesian classification – prediction: linear – non linear.Unit 5 Cluster analysis 9 Types of Data in cluster analysis - Major clustering methods. Data mining applicationsText Books 1. Han J. & Kambler, M, “Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques”, Morgan Kaufmann, 2005.References 1. Immon.W.H., “Building the Data Warehouse”, Wiley Dream Tech, 3rd Edition, 2003. 2. Anahory S., Murray, D, “Data Warehousing in the Real World”, Addison Wesley, 1st Edition, 1997.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 69. ITE322 Artificial Intelligence L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The students would be able to understand and explain the basics of Artificial Intelligence, problem solving techniques, knowledge representation, reasoning systems and Expert systemsOutcomesUnit 1 AI-Foundations 12 History-Intelligent Agents - Perception and Language Processing - Problem Solving- Searching-Heuristic Search-Game Playing, Introduction to Predicate calculus, Expert Systems and Robotics, Over view of AI languages such as PROLOG and LISPUnit 2 Agents that Reason Logically 9 First order logic-Inference in first order logic-Logical reasoning.Unit 3 Semantic Nets and Description Matching 9 Frames-Inheritance and common sense Rules-Rule Chaining, Substrates and cognitive modeling.Unit 4 Uncertainty-Probabilistic Reasoning Systems 11 Making simple and complex decisions Nonmonotonic reasoning and Truth Maintenance.Unit 5 Planning 9 Representation for planning-Partial order planning-Conditional planning- Replanning agent-Learning-Analyzing differences-Explaining experience-Correcting mistakes- Recording cases-Overview of Version space method-Identification trees-Neural nets and Genetic algorithms, Expert systems Architecture.Text Books 1. Stewart Russel, Peter Norvig. "Artificial Intelligence-A Modern Approach", PHI, 1995.References 1. . Patrick Henry Winston, "Artificial Intelligence", 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999. 2. Elain Rich and Kevin Knight, "Artificial Intelligence", Tata McGraw Hill, 1993.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 70. ITE311 Embedded Systems L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite Computer Architecture and Organization ITE204Objectives • To teach the fundamentals of embedded system • To understand programs and tools for embedded system . • To impart knowledge about real time operating system • To elucidate knowledge of embedded system types and its interfacing mechanismsOutcomes The students will be able to 1. Understand and use in embedded system and device drivers. Use software engineering practices in embedded systems development and Inter process communicationUnit 1 EMBEDDED MICROCONTROLLERS 12 Introduction: Contrast between an embedded system and other computer systems; the role of programming and its associated languages as applied to embedded systems; the purpose and role of embedded systems in computer engineering. Microcontrollers: Structure of a basic computer system: CPU, memory, I/O devices on a bus; CPU families used in microcontrollers: 4-bit, 8-bit, 16-32-bit; Basic I/O devices: timers/counters, GPIO, A/D, D/A; Polled I/O vs. interrupt-driven I/O; Interrupt structures: vectored and prioritized interrupts; DMA transfers; Memory management units; Memory hierarchies and caches.Unit 2 EMBEDDED PROGRAMS AND TOOLS 9 The program translation process: compilation, assembly, linking; Representations of programs: data flow and control flow; Fundamental concepts of assembly language and linking: labels, address management; Compilation tasks: mapping variables to memory, managing data structures, translating control structures, and translating expressions; Tool support: Compilers and programming environments; Logic analyzers; RTOS tools; Power analysis; Software management tools; Project management tools.Unit 3 REAL-TIME OPERATING SYSTEMS 9 Real-time operating systems: Context switching mechanisms; Scheduling policies; Rate-monotonic scheduling: theory and practice; Priority inversion; other scheduling policies such as EDF; Message-passing vs. shared memory communication; Interprocess communication styles such as mailbox and RPC; Low-power computing: Sources of energy consumption: toggling, leakage; Instruction-level strategies for power management: function unit management; Memory system power consumption: caches, off-chip memory; Power consumption with multiple processes; System-level power management: deterministic, probabilistic methods.Unit 4 NETWORKED EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 11 Why networked embedded systems; Example networked embedded systems: automobiles, factory automation systems; The OSI reference model; Types of network fabrics; Network performance analysis; Basic principles of the Internet protocol; Internet-enabled embedded systems; Controller Area Network; Embedded Ethernet Controller; Inter Integrated Circuits(I2C)Unit 5 INTERFACING AND MIXED-SIGNAL SYSTEMS 9 Digital-to-analog conversion; Analog-to-digital conversion; How to partition analog/digital processing in interfaces; Digital processing and real-time considerations. ARM Controllers;Text Books 1. Wayner Wolf, Computers as components – Principles of embedded computing system design, Morgan Kaufman,2001 2. Rajkamal, “Embedded Systems-Application, Practice & Design”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2003 3. Arnold S. Berger, “Embedded Systems Design”, CMP Books, 1997ReferencesMoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End Examination
  • 71. Recommended bythe Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 72. ITE312 Embedded Systems Lab L T P CPrerequisite Computer Architecture and OrganizationObjectivesOutcomesExercises Programming in 8051 a. Handling Port b. Waveform generation c. ADC; DAC d. Interrupt Programming e. Stepper Motor Interfacing
  • 73. ITE314 Object Oriented Analysis and Design L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE201Objectives • The students would be able to understand the techniques, applications and UML based object oriented analysis and design.OutcomesUnit 1 Complexity of software 12 Structure of complex systems, decomposing complexity, Designing complex systems, Object Model: Evolution, Elements of object model, Applying object modelUnit 2 Elements of Notation 9 Class diagrams, state transition diagrams, object diagrams, Interaction diagrams, module diagrams, process diagrams, applying the notation. Principles, micro development process, macro development process.Unit 3 Management and planning 9 Staffing, Release management, Reuse, Quality Assurance and Metrics, Documentation, Tools, Benefits and Risks of Object Oriented developmentUnit 4 Introduction to Object-Oriented Paradigm and UML 11 Unified Process, the Requirement Workflow, Object-Oriented Analysis Workflow, Object- Oriented Design Workflow, Workflow and phases of the Unified process.Unit 5 Analysis and Design 9 Case studies, Teams, Testing, Management Issues, Planning and Estimating, Maintenance, User Interface system, Introduction to Web – Based Systems.Text Books 1. Grady Booch, "Object Oriented Analysis and Design with applications", Addison Wesley, 1994.References 1. Schach, Stephen R., "An Introduction to Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design with UML and the Unified Process", Tata McGraw Hill, 2003.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 74. ITE323 Network Programming L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE213Objectives • The students shall be able to learn JAVA programming to share data across Internet for File transfer, Software updates etc., and accomplish many Network programming tasks.OutcomesUnit 1 Introduction 12 Why networked Java What can a network program do, Security Basic network concepts: Networks, The layers of a network, IP,TCP and UDP, The Internet, The client/server model, Internet Standards, Basic Web concepts: URLs, HTML, SGML, and XML, HTTP,MIME Media types, Server Side Programs.Unit 2 Threads 9 Running Threads, Returning Information from a Thread, Synchronization, Deadlock, Thread scheduling, Thread pools, Looking Up Internet Addresses: The InetAddress Class,Inet4Address and Inet6Address,The Network Interface Class, Some useful programs, URLs: The URL class, URL encoder and URL decoder Classes, URL class, Proxies, communicating with Server Side Programs Through GET, Accessing Password- Protected Sites.Unit 3 Sockets for Clients 9 Socket Basics, Investigating Protocols with Telnet, The Socket Class, Socket Exceptions, Socket Addresses, Examples, Sockets For Servers: The Server Socket Class, Some Useful Servers, Secure Sockets: Secure Communications, Creating Secure Client Sockets, Methods of SSLSocket Class, Creating Secure Server Sockets, Methods of the SSLServerSocket Class.Unit 4 UDP Datagrams and Sockets 11 The UDP protocol, The Datagram Packet Class, The Datagram Socket Class, Some useful Applications, Datagram Channel, URLConnections: Opening URL Connections, Reading Data from a server, Reading the Header, Configuring the Connection, Configuring the Client Request HTTP Header, Writing Data to a server, Content Handlers, The Object Methods, Security Considerations for URLConnections, Guessing MIME Content Types, HttpURLConnection, Caches, JAR URLConnection.Unit 5 Remote Method Invocation 9 What is RMI? Implementation, Loading Classes at Runtime, the java.rmi Package, the java.rmi.registry Package, the java.rmi.server Package, The JavaMailAPI: What are Java Mail API, Sending Email, Receiving Email, Password Authentication, Addresses, The URLName Class, The Message Class, the Path Interface, Multipath Messages and File Attachments, MIME messages, Folders.Text Books 1. Elliotte Rusty Harold “JAVA Network Programming” 3rd Edition published by Sharoff Publishers and Distributors Pvt. Ltd, Mumbai, 2005.References 1.David Reilly, Michael Reilly. "Java Network Programming & Distributed Computing", Published by Addison-Wesley. ISBN: 0201710374MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 75. ITE324 Networking Lab L T P C 0 0 4 2Prerequisite ITE323ObjectivesOutcomesExercises 14. Write a program to display the server’s date and time details at the client end. 15. Write a program to display the client’s address at the server end. 16. Write a program to implement an echo UDP server. 17. Write a program to develop a simple Chat application. 18. The message entered in the client is sent to the server and the server encodes the message and returns it to the client. Encoding is done by replacing a character by the character next to it i.e. a as b, b as c …z as a. This process is done using the TCP/IP protocol. Write a program for the above 19. The message entered in the client is sent to the server and the server encodes the message and returns it to the client. Encoding is done by replacing a character by the character next to it i.e. a as b, b as c …z as a. This process is done using UDP. Write a program for the above 20. Write a program to display the name and address of the computer that we are currently working on. 21. Write a program to capture each packet and to examine its checksum field. 22. Write a program to create a daemon process. 23. A server should run for 10 secs and generate numbers continuously. The client connecting to it should read data and find out the sum of the data thus read. Write a Java program to implement this scenario. 24. Write graphical user interface for the sales database which lists all the customer names in one choice box and all products in another. When the user selects a customer name and product and press the “submit” button, display a list with the customer name, product, quantity, and date of order by the customer with the name of that product. Use prepared statements whenever possible. 25. Design and populate a database for a car rental system. Allow the client to check the availability of a category of car and to make reservation. 26. Write program to illustrate the following: i). Remote object interaction. ii). File downloading and uploading.
  • 76. ITE327 Data Warehousing and Data L T P C Mining 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE315Objectives • To make familiar with the various concepts of data warehousing like meta data, data mart, summary table, fact data and dimension data. To sail along with the various approaches in data mining. To familiarize with the various data warehousing and data mining toolsOutcomesUnit 1 Data Warehouse and OLAP Technology for Data mining 12 Introduction to Data Warehouse- A multidimensional Data Model – Data Warehouse architecture – Data preprocessing- Data cleaning – Data integration and Transformation.Unit 2 Data Mining Introduction 9 Introduction to Data Mining – Data Mining Functionalities – Classification of Data Mining systems, Major issues in Data mining.Unit 3 Data Mining primitives, languages & system architecture 9 Data Mining primitives: Task – relevant data – kind of knowledge to be mined – Background knowledge – interestingness measures– presentation & visualization of discovered pattern - Data Mining Query language – Designing Graphical User interfaces based on DMQL - Architecture of Data mining.Unit 4 Association Rule Mining 11 Basic concepts – market basket analysis - Mining single dimensional Boolean association rules from transactional databases. Classification & prediction: What’s classification - issues regarding classification and prediction – Bayesian classification – prediction: linear – non linear.Unit 5 Cluster analysis 9 Types of Data in cluster analysis - Major clustering methods. Data mining applicationsText Books 1. Han J. & Kambler, M, “Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques”, Morgan Kaufmann, 2005.References 1. . Immon.W.H., “Building the Data Warehouse”, Wiley Dream Tech, 3rd Edition, 2003. 2. Anahory S., Murray, D, “Data Warehousing in the Real World”, Addison Wesley, 1st Edition, 1997.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 77. ITE322 Artificial Intelligence L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The students would be able to understand and explain the basics of Artificial Intelligence, problem solving techniques, knowledge representation, reasoning systems and Expert systemsOutcomesUnit 1 AI-Foundations 12 History-Intelligent Agents - Perception and Language Processing - Problem Solving- Searching-Heuristic Search-Game Playing, Introduction to Predicate calculus, Expert Systems and Robotics, Over view of AI languages such as PROLOG and LISPUnit 2 Agents that Reason Logically 9 First order logic-Inference in first order logic-Logical reasoning.Unit 3 Semantic Nets and Description Matching 9 Frames-Inheritance and common sense Rules-Rule Chaining, Substrates and cognitive modeling.Unit 4 Uncertainty-Probabilistic Reasoning Systems 11 Making simple and complex decisions Nonmonotonic reasoning and Truth Maintenance.Unit 5 Planning 9 Representation for planning-Partial order planning-Conditional planning- Replanning agent-Learning-Analyzing differences-Explaining experience-Correcting mistakes- Recording cases-Overview of Version space method-Identification trees-Neural nets and Genetic algorithms, Expert systems Architecture.Text Books 1. Stewart Russel, Peter Norvig. "Artificial Intelligence-A Modern Approach", PHI, 1995.References 1. Patrick Henry Winston, "Artificial Intelligence", 3rd Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999. 2. Elain Rich and Kevin Knight, "Artificial Intelligence", Tata McGraw Hill, 1993.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 78. ITE317 Data Communication and Computer L T P C Networks 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The subject aims to serve as a foundation course on Data Communication and Computer Networking.Outcomes • The students would be able to understand and explain the fundamental principles of networking. They would be able to compare and contrast various networking topologies, communications devices and services. They would be able to get an exposure to advanced and emerging technologies.Unit 1 Introduction – Computer Networks and Open Systems Standards 12 Introduction and importance of communication systems, Computer networks, Standards and standards organizations, Open systems and the OSI modelUnit 2 TRANSMISSION FUNDAMENTALS 9 Communication media, Communication services and devices, Codes, Analog and Digital signals, Modulation and Demodulation, Modem standards. Multiplexing, Error Detection and Correction, Data Link control and protocol.Unit 3 TYPES OF NETWORKS AND ROUTING ALGORITHMS 9 Local area networks, High-speed and Bridged local area networks, Wide area networks, Internet working devices, Repeaters, Bridges, Routers, Gateways routing algorithms, Distance vector routing, Link state routing.Unit 4 INTERNETWORKING 11 Inter-network architectures and issues, Network layer structure, Internet protocol standards, Internet, IP, IPV6, The ISO Internet protocol, ISO Routing protocols.Unit 5 BROADBAND MULTI-SERVICE NETWORKS 9 Networking requirements, FDDI – II, Cell-based networks, Wireless LANs, CDMA, TCP/IP, Congestion control and Quality of Service, SMTP, HTTP, URL and WWW, Introduction to Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM)Text Books 1. . Behrouz A. Forouzan, “Data Communications and Networking”, Tata Mcgraw Hill, 2005. 2.Fred Halsall, “Data Communications, Computer Networks and Open systems”, Pearson Education, 2005.References 1. Brijendra Singh, “Data Communication and Computer Networks”, Prentice Hall of India, Delhi, 2004MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 79. ITE311 Embedded Systems L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE216Objectives • To teach the fundamentals of embedded system • To understand programs and tools for embedded system . • To impart knowledge about real time operating system • To elucidate knowledge of embedded system types and its interfacing mechanismsOutcomes The students will be able to 1. Understand and use in embedded system and device drivers. 2. Use software engineering practices in embedded systems development and Inter process communication.Unit 1 EMBEDDED MICROCONTROLLERS 12 Introduction: Contrast between an embedded system and other computer systems; the role of programming and its associated languages as applied to embedded systems; the purpose and role of embedded systems in computer engineering. Microcontrollers: Structure of a basic computer system: CPU, memory, I/O devices on a bus; CPU families used in microcontrollers: 4-bit, 8-bit, 16-32-bit; Basic I/O devices: timers/counters, GPIO, A/D, D/A; Polled I/O vs. interrupt-driven I/O; Interrupt structures: vectored and prioritized interrupts; DMA transfers; Memory management units; Memory hierarchies and caches.Unit 2 EMBEDDED PROGRAMS AND TOOLS 9 The program translation process: compilation, assembly, linking; Representations of programs: data flow and control flow; Fundamental concepts of assembly language and linking: labels, address management; Compilation tasks: mapping variables to memory, managing data structures, translating control structures, and translating expressions; Tool support: Compilers and programming environments; Logic analyzers; RTOS tools; Power analysis; Software management tools; Project management toolsUnit 3 REAL-TIME OPERATING SYSTEMS 9 Real-time operating systems: Context switching mechanisms; Scheduling policies; Rate-monotonic scheduling: theory and practice; Priority inversion; other scheduling policies such as EDF; Message-passing vs. shared memory communication; Interprocess communication styles such as mailbox and RPC; Low-power computing: Sources of energy consumption: toggling, leakage; Instruction-level strategies for power management: function unit management; Memory system power consumption: caches, off-chip memory; Power consumption with multiple processes; System-level power management: deterministic, probabilistic methods.Unit 4 NETWORKED EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 11 Why networked embedded systems; Example networked embedded systems: automobiles, factory automation systems; The OSI reference model; Types of network fabrics; Network performance analysis; Basic principles of the Internet protocol; Internet-enabled embedded systems; Controller Area Network; Embedded Ethernet Controller; Inter Integrated Circuits(I2C)Unit 5 INTERFACING AND MIXED-SIGNAL SYSTEMS 9 Digital-to-analog conversion; Analog-to-digital conversion; How to partition analog/digital processing in interfaces; Digital processing and real-time considerations. ARM ControllersText Books 1. 1. Wayner Wolf, Computers as components – Principles of embedded computing system design, Morgan Kaufman,2001 2. Rajkamal, “Embedded Systems-Application, Practice & Design”, Tata McGraw Hill, 2003 3. Arnold S. Berger, “Embedded Systems Design”, CMP Books, 1997ReferencesMoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies on
  • 80. Date of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil ITE312 Embedded Systems Lab L T P C 0 0 3 2Prerequisite ITE311Objectives •OutcomesExercises Programming in 8051 f. Handling Port g. Waveform generation h. ADC; DAC i. Interrupt Programming j. Stepper Motor Interfacing
  • 81. ITE411 Computer Graphics and Multimedia L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE313Objectives • To study the graphics techniques and algorithms. • To study the multimedia concepts and various I/O technologies. • To enable the students to develop their creativityOutcomesUnit 1 OUTPUT PRIMITIVES 12 Introduction - Line - Curve and Ellipse Algorithms – Attributes – Two-Dimensional Geometric Transformations – Two-Dimensional ViewingUnit 2 THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONCEPTS 9 Three-Dimensional Object Representations – Three-Dimensional Geometric and Modeling Transformations – Three-Dimensional Viewing – Color models – AnimationUnit 3 MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS DESIGN 9 An Introduction – Multimedia applications – Multimedia System Architecture – Evolving technologies for Multimedia – Defining objects for Multimedia systems – Multimedia Data interface standards – Multimedia Databases.Unit 4 MULTIMEDIA FILE HANDLING 11 Compression & Decompression – Data & File Format standards – Multimedia I/O technologies - Digital voice and audio – video image and animation – Full motion video – Storage and retrieval Technologies.Unit 5 HYPERMEDIA 9 Multimedia Authoring & User Interface – Hypermedia messaging - Mobile Messaging – Hypermedia message component – creating Hypermedia message – Integrated multimedia message standards – Integrated Document management – Distributed Multimedia Systems.Text Books 1. Donald Hearn and M.Pauline Baker, “Computer Graphics C Version”, Pearson Education, 2003. (UNITI : Chapters1 to 6;UNIT2:Chapter9 – 12, 15, 16) 2. Prabat K Andleigh and Kiran Thakrar, “Multimedia Systems and Design”, PHI, 2003.(UNIT3to5)References 1. Judith Jeffcoate, “Multimedia in practice technology and Applications”, PHI,1998. 2. Foley, Vandam, Feiner, Huges, “Computer Graphics: Principles & Practice”, PearsonEducation,secondedition2003.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 82. ITE415 Network Security and Cryptography L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite ITE323ObjectivesOutcomesUnit 1 PRINCIPLES OF NETWORK AND DESIGN 12 Design objectives – Understanding the networking environment – Achieving the design goals – Importance of being predictable and fundamental design principles. - Designing the campus LAN – campus network design goals – Understanding the campus network – Designing the LAN topology – Campus hierarchical design.Unit 2 DESIGNING THE WAN 9 Designing the WAN topology – flat versus hierarchical, flat WAN topology – limitations of a flat design – hierarchical WAN topology – PVC and leased line Aggregation - Issues with hierarchical design – hierarchical layers – WAN design parameters- choosing the WAN technology – design considerations for serial links – designing IP over frame relay, and ISDN design issues with IP – fundamental IP routing design – designing an IP addressing plan – categorizing IP routing protocol and RIP.Unit 3 SECURITY PROBLEM AND CRYPTOGRAPHY 9 Security attacks – services – and mechanism – Conventional encryption model – Steganography – classical encryption techniques – simplified DES – block Cipher principles- The DES standards – Principles of Public key cryptosystems – RSA algorithm – Key management – Diffie- Hellman key exchange – Authentication requirements and functions – Authentication codes Hash functions KerberosUnit 4 NETWORK SECURITY 11 E-mail security – pretty good privacy – S/MIME – IP security – overview and architecture – authentication header – encapsulating security payload – combing security associations – web security requirements SSL – TLS – secure electronic transactions – intruders- higher wall design principles – trusted systems.Unit 5 NETWORK MANAGEMENT 9 Network management – requirements and systems – Network monitoring architecture – Performance monitoring – Fault monitoring – Account monitoring – Configuration control – Security control – SNMP background and concepts – structure of management information – SNMP protocol – Basic concepts – specifications – Transport level support – Groups.Text BooksReferencesMoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 83. REAL-TIME SYSTEMS L T P C 3 0 0 3PrerequisiteObjectives • The students would be able to understand the real time systems concepts to select architectures and programming languages, Analyze the Real Time systems requirements, Evaluate the fault tolerance techniques and systems reliability.OutcomesUnit 1 Introduction 12 Issues in real-time system, task classes, architecture issues, operating system issues, performance measure for real time systems, estimating program run times, classical uniprocessor scheduling algorithm, uniprocessor scheduling of IRIS tasks.Unit 2 Programming Languages and Tools 9 Introduction, desirable languages characteristics, data types, control structures, facilitating hierarchical decomposition packages, exception handling, overloading and generics, multitasking, task scheduling, timing specification, programming environments, run-time support.Unit 3 Real-Time Database & Communication 9 Basic definitions, real time vs. general purpose databases, main memory databases, transaction priorities, transaction aborts, concurrency control issues, maintaining serialization consistency, databases for real-time systems.Unit 4 Fault -Tolerance Techniques 11 Introduction, failure causes, fault types, fault detection, fault and error containment, redundancy, data diversity, reversal checks,Unit 5 Reliability & Clock Synchronization 9 Introduction, obtaining parameter values, reliability models for hardware redundancy, software error models, clock synchronization, nonfault-tolerant synchronization algorithms, impact of faults.Text Books 1. C.M. Krishna, Kang G. shin, “Real-Time systems”, McGraw Hill, 2004.References 1. R.J.A. Buhr, D.L. Bailey, “An Introduction to Real-Time Systems”, Prentice-Hall International, 1999.MoE CAT, Quiz, Seminar, Assignment, Term-End ExaminationRecommendedby the Board ofStudies onDate of Approvalby the AcademicCouncil
  • 84. ENG001 Effective English L T P C 3 0 0 3Prerequisite English at + 2 levelObjectives • To help the second language learners to acquire confidence in their basic writing and speaking. • To enable the students to acquire structure and written expressions required for their profession.Outcomes The learners will get the required training in LSRW through the given tasks. Speaking: Introduction and greetings - asking/offering information - requesting/inviting Writing: Making meaningful sentences from the jumbled words - development of basic writing skills applying studied grammatical structures - hints development Communication & Functional skills: Fundamentals of communication and barriers to effective communication. Corrective Grammar I - parts of speech Speaking: Integrated interrogative and discourse use with targeted vocabulary and functions; Communicative and decision making activities based on authentic reading materials; Authentic video materials to improve extraction of information from the given source. Writing: Rewriting the given texts following the prompts - instructional writing skills - illustrative and descriptive writing. Communication & Functional skills: Non-verbal communication Corrective Grammar II - concord Speaking: Role-plays in various life like situations - debating to express points of view - project development in groups and pair-work to increase communication practice. Writing: Critical appreciation of the given text - narrative written structures to express past events - written communication for task oriented goals. Communication & Functional skills: Listening and negotiating Corrective Grammar III - tenses & error detectionText Books 9. Sunitha Mishra and C. Muralikrishna, Communication Skills for Engineers, Pearson Education. 10. A.J. Thomson and A.V. Martinet, A Practical English Grammar,OUP, Delhi1.Michael McCarthy and Felicity (2003), English Vocabulary in Use - Advanced, CUP. 11. Andrea J. Rutherford, Basic Communication Skills for Technology, Pearson Education Asia. 12. Murphy, Murphy’s English Grammar with CD, Cambridge University Press. 13. English Skills for Technical Students, WBSCTE with British Council, Orient Longman. 14. Robert J. Dixson (2006), Everyday Dialogues in English, Prentice-Hall of India Ltd. 15. Bhaskaran and Horsburgh, Strengthen Your English,Oxford University Press. 16. M. Ashraf Rizvi, Effective Technical Communication,McGraw-Hill. Adrian Doff and Chris Jones (2006), Language in Use, CambridgeMoE Writing and speaking skills, tests, quizzes, assignments and seminars.Recommended by the
  • 85. Board of Studies onDate of Approval by theAcademic Council
  • 86. ITE101 Problem Solving Using C LTPC 2 0  2  3Version No. 1.0Course Pre-requisites/ Co- Nonerequisites/anti-requisites (if any).Otherwise, please indicateas ‘None’Objectives:Expected Outcome:Unit No. 1 Overview of Problem Solving 8 Introduction to Computer based Problem Solving-Program Design - Top-down design and stepwise refinement, loops, basic programming constructs-Implementation Issues-Programming Environment : Assemblers, compilers, interpreters, linkers, loadersUnit No. 2 Basic Algorithms 7 Examples : Summation of set of numbers, sine function computation, Base Conversion, character to number conversion, Reversing digits of an integer, Square root of a number, Smallest divisor, generation of the Fibonacci sequence, Raising a number to a large powerUnit No. 3 Fundamentals of C Programming 6 Overview of C - Data types-Constants and Variables-Expressions and Operators-Decision making and Branching-Looping constructs-Basic Input/ Output operationsUnit No. 4 Programming Constructs 12 Arrays : One dimensional and multidimensional arrays Examples: Array order reversal, Removal of duplicates from an ordered array, Binary search, Matrix manipulations; -Understanding of simple Pointers : Pointer arithmetic, pointer vs arrays functions. Structures : Declarations - nested structures- array of structures - structure to functions - unions- difference between structure and union.Unit No. 5 Functions and file handling 12 Functions- Prototype – declaration - arguments (formal and actual) – return types – types of functions; difference between built-in and user-defined functions; Recursion . Introduction to File handling in C : Opening, Closing, input / output.Text Books 1. R.G. Dromey, "How to Solve it by Computer", Prentice Hall of India, 1992. 2. Mitchell Waite & Stephen Prata, “ New Primer C plus”, Waite Group.References 1. B.W. Kernighan & D.M. Ritchie, "The C Programming Language", Prentice Hall of India, 1989. 2. Cooper,Mullish, "The Spirit of C", Jaico Publishing House, New Delhi, 1987. 3. Richard Johnson-Baugh & Martin Kalin, "Application Programming in C", Macmillan International editions, 1990. 4. 4. Kenneth A.,C, "Problem Solving and Programming", Prentice Hall International.Mode of Evaluation Continuous Assessment (Quizzes, CATs, Assignments, etc.) and TEE
  • 87. Recommended by the xx-xx-xxxxBoard of Studies onDate of Approval by Xxth Academic Council held on xx-xx-xxxxthe Academic Council