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Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
Diabetes
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Diabetes

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  • There are 16 million people in the United States who have diabetes. Unfortunately, about half are not aware that they have the disease. Are you at risk?
  • Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Diabetes is the fourth-leading cause of death by disease in the United States. It is a chronic disease for which there is no cure.
  • Most people with diabetes do not notice any symptoms. However, if you have any of these symptoms, you should call your health care provider right away.
  • The following have a greater risk of developing diabetes: People with family history of diabetes. People who are overweight and have high blood sugar. People who do not exercise regularly. Certain racial and ethnic groups such as African Americans, Latinos and Native Americans. Women who had gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes occurring in 2-5 percent of all pregnancies.
  • People with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have heart disease which is present in 75 percent of diabetes-related deaths, (more than 77,000 deaths due to heart disease annually). Also, they are 2 to 4 times more likely to suffer a stroke. Kidney Disease; Ten to twenty-one percent of all people with diabetes develop kidney disease. Nerve Disease and Amputations; diabetes is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputations. The risk of a leg amputation is 15-40 times greater for a person with diabetes. Blindness; diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in people ages 20-74.
  • So far, type I diabetes cannot be prevented. Type II can often be prevented with exercise such as walking, swimming, dancing, riding a bicycle, playing baseball and bowling are examples of good ways to exercise. Try to exercise at least three times a week for about 30 to 40 minutes each time. Before beginning any exercise program, be sure to check with your physician. If you exercise often, you will keep a normal body weight. People should eat fruits, fruits juices, and plain vegetables. Food labels can help you choose healthy foods. Fat free has the least amount of fat, very low fat and low fat have a little more, reduced fat or less means that the food has 25% fat than the regular version of food. Test your blood sugar. You should ask your physician when you should test your blood sugar.
  • Type I diabetes is treated with daily insulin injections, regular exercise, and a balanced meal plan. Your meal plan will be tailored to your individual needs. You will generally have to eat meal and snacks at set times each day to balance insulin. Insulin lowers blood glucose, and food raises it. Type II is treated with an individualized meal plan and exercise. If diet and exercise alone do not control blood glucose, prescribed pills or insulin may be needed.
  • African Americans are 1.4 to 2.3 times as likely to have type II diabetes as the general population. An estimated 2.6 million African Americans, or 9.6%, have diabetes. Latinos are 2 to 4 times as likely to have type II diabetes. Diabetes affects 9.6% of Mexican American population, 9.1% of the Cuban American population and 10.9% of the Puerto Rican population. Native Americans overall prevalence of type II diabetes in Native Americans is 12.2% vs. 5.2% of the general population.
  • The American Diabetes Association is the nation’s leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy. The American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their family, health care professionals and the public. This association is not support for any government agencies, so it receives money from communities through fund raisings.
  • American Diabetes Association, mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. It affiliates and chapters in more than 800 communities, conducts programs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Diabetes Are You At Risk?
    • 2. What is Diabetes?  Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin  Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life
    • 3. Warnings Signs of Diabetes  Type I Diabetes Frequent urination Unusual thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Weakness and fatigue Irritability Nausea and vomiting  Type II Diabetes Any of the type I symptoms Frequent infections Blurred vision Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal Tingling/numbness in hands or feet Recurring skin, gum or bladder infection
    • 4. Factors  Family history of diabetes  Overweight and high blood sugar  Lack of regular exercise  Certain racial and ethnic groups African Americans, Latinos and Native Americas  History of gestational diabetes
    • 5. Complications Heart Disease and Stroke Amputations Kidney Disease Blindness
    • 6. Prevention  Get regular exercise  Maintain normal body weight  Eat healthy food  Test your blood sugar  Consult your doctor
    • 7. Treatment  Type I Diabetes requires daily insulin injections, regular exercise a balanced meal plan  Type II Diabetes requires an individualized meal plan and exercise prescribed pills or insulin diet and exercise
    • 8. Impact of Diabetes 9.6% 9.6% 9.1%10.9% 12.2% 5.2% African Americans Mexican American Cuban Americans Puerto Rican Native Americans General Population
    • 9. American Diabetes Association  is the nation’s leading nonprofit health organization  provides research, information and advocacy  publishes scientific findings  provides information and services to people with Diabetes
    • 10. Mission “ To prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.”

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