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Jackie Robinson: The Man, The Baseball Legend, The Icon
 

Jackie Robinson: The Man, The Baseball Legend, The Icon

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It is rare in our lifetimes to truly see greatness that changes the face of society and sport. History is littered with only a few stories of epic human greatness, especially in the sporting world, ...

It is rare in our lifetimes to truly see greatness that changes the face of society and sport. History is littered with only a few stories of epic human greatness, especially in the sporting world, that has broken down barriers, stood the test of time and still resonates with the sport, the nation and the world. One of those stories is that of the great baseball player, Jackie Robinson. http://www.ripit.com/

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    Jackie Robinson: The Man, The Baseball Legend, The Icon Jackie Robinson: The Man, The Baseball Legend, The Icon Presentation Transcript

    • The Man, The Baseball Legend, The Icon Presented by RIP-IT Sports
    • It is rare in our lifetimes to truly see greatness that changes the face of society and sport. History is littered with only a few stories of epic human greatness, especially in the sporting world, that has broken down barriers, stood the test of time and still resonates with the sport, the nation and the world. One of those stories is that of the great baseball player, Jackie Robinson.
    • The Early Years Jackie Robinson was born on January 31st in 1919 and seemed destined for greatness in athleticism since his participation in several of sporting teams. As a guard on his high school basketball team, Robinson varsity lettered and again as the football team’s quarterback. He also lettered as a track athlete and in 1936 he won the annual Pacific Coast Negro Tennis Tournament. That same year he also earned a place on the Pomona All Star Baseball team which also included baseball greats such as Bob Lemon and Ted Williams.
    • Robinson’s Time in Hawaii By 1941, Robinson was slated to be an incredible football star through his playing for the semiprofessional Honolulu Bears. The racially integrated football team allowed him to play on the weekends and work as a construction worker throughout the week. After an exhibition game in Pearl Harbor and a short season, Jackie headed back to the mainland just two days before the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and took America into a world war.
    • A War Lieutenant Soon after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Robinson was drafted to Army military service, eventually becoming a second lieutenant and being assigned to Fort Hood, Texas. While serving his country in 1944, Robinson was boarding an Army un- segregated bus line and was told to move to the back of the bus because of his color. When Robinson refused to do so, he was court- martialed. An act that later was rescinded and turned into an honorable discharge because Robinson was not disobeying any military duties.
    • A Move to Professional Baseball Following his discharge, Jackie took a coaching job for a college basketball team during their 1944-1945 season. By the 1945 baseball season, Robinson had resigned from the coaching job and begun playing for the Negro Leagues’ Kansas City Monarchs. The following year he moved up to the minors, spring training with the Montreal Royals. And on a fateful day in April, Robinson was called up to the Majors to play the 1947 season with the Brooklyn Dodgers.
    • A Hero in Baseball is Born While Robinson was already a war hero, he became a baseball legend the day he debuted as the first black player in the Majors since 1880. On April 15th, 1947, Robin stepped out onto Ebbets Field before a crowd of 26,623 spectators which included 14,000 Negros in attendance. During his first season he played 151 games as the Dodgers’ first baseman with a batting average of .296 and scoring 125 runs. It was during this season that Robinson faced the most persecution for his color and still won the MLB Rookie of the Year Award.
    • A Baseball Champion Jackie went on to play several more seasons for the Dodgers, being named an MLB All-Star 6 years in a row (1949-1954). In his 1954 season, Robinson had his best game on June 17th where he hit two home runs and two doubles. The next season Jackie led the Dodgers to his only championship win in the World Series of 1955 against the rival New York Yankees. Robinson played his last game in the MLB and for the Dodgers on October 10th in 1956, ending a career that had changed the face of baseball and removed segregation in professional sports.
    • A Leader On and Off the Field Following his professional baseball career, Robinson was known as a leader in other endeavors. He was the first African American television analyst in the history of the MLB as well as the first black Vice President of an American Corporation (Chock Full O'Nuts in 1957). He also was an entrepreneur, an author and a community leader. After his death, Robinson was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal and inducted as a member of the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Before his death (Oct 24th, 1972), Robinson was also inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame (1962) where he encouraged all those voting to consider only his field qualifications, rather than his significant cultural impact on the game.
    • An Icon in The Civil Rights Movement, the Game of Baseball and History Jackie Robinson became an icon in the American civil rights movement with Dr Martin Luther King Jr. stating him to be, “A legend and symbol in his own time… who challenged the dark skies of intolerance and frustration.” He changed the game of baseball by removing nearly 6 decades of segregation within the sport and as Doris Kearns Goodwin put it, “His accomplishments allowed black and white Americans to be more respectful and open to one another and more appreciative of everyone’s abilities.” It is rare in our lifetimes to truly see greatness that changes the face of society and sport. The story of Jackie Robinson broke down barriers, has stood the test of time and still resonates with the sport, the nation and the world.