Non-Profit Program Planning and Evaluation

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Presentation for Dallas Center for Nonprofit Management for the Nonprofit Management Certificate Program - Part 1 of Program Planning and Evaluation.

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  • Hello. This is an excellent material. Can you send it to my email add for my school presentation? Thank you so much. Please email at marivicrivera2004@yahoo.com
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  • Fairly Obvious – but before you evaluate – you should have a well established means to conduct itself as an organization Evaluation Effective ways to meet goals Methods are in the form of programsInputs, Process, outputs & outcomes – which you will practice in the afternoon sessionInputs = various resources needed to run the program -- money, facilities, customers, clients, program staff, etcProcess = how program is carried out – customers served, clients counseled, children cared for, art is created, association members are supportedOutputs = units of service – customers serviced, # of clients counseled, children cared for, artistic pieces produced, or members in the associationOutcomes = impacts on the customer or the clients receiving service – increased mental health, safe and secure development, richer artistic appreciation & perspectives in life, increase effectiveness among members
  • Technology – does not mean computers – refers to transformation process – changing people or communities
  • Planning and reviewing are the starting and ending points of theongoing cycle of delivering high-quality programs.The planning process focuses attention on the program's most critical challenges and opportunities. Leaders can gain insight into the future direction of their agency's programs and services and the way they affect the community at large. Planning provides an opportunity for program leaders to think about the future and commit to goals and activities that will set or keep the program on course over the next few years.
  • Develop an plan to ensure your program planning & evaluations are carried out efficiently in the future. Funders may benefit from having this plan…
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  • Don’t balk b/c it’s too scientific – 20% effort will generate 80% of plan – far better than nothingNo perfect evaluation design – Far more important to do something than to test every last detailInclude some interview in your evaluation methods – questionnaires don’t capture the story – and the story is the most powerful depiction of the description of your servicesDon’t interview just the successes – you can learn a great deal about the program by understanding failures and dropoutsDon’t throw away evaluation results once a report has been generated. Results don’t take up much room – may be precious info later…
  • reactions and feelings (feelings are often poor indicators that your service made lasting impact)learning (enhanced attitudes, perceptions or knowledge)changes in skills (applied the learning to enhance behaviors)effectiveness (improved performance because of enhanced behaviors) Usually, the farther your evaluation information gets down the list, the more useful is your evaluation. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to reliably get information about effectiveness. Still, information about learning and skills is quite useful.
  • For example:80% of your profits come from 20% of your customers80% of your complaints come from 20% of your customers80% of your profits come from 20% of the time you spend80% of your sales come from 20% of your products80% of your sales are made by 20% of your sales staffMicrosoft noted that by fixing the top 20% of the most reported bugs, 80% of the errors and crashes would be eliminated
  • Better to have an average effort at evaluation then to do no evaluation at all
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  • Handout1) "Personal mastery is a discipline of continually clarifying and deepening our personal vision, of focusing our energies, of developing patience, and of seeing reality objectively." (p. 7) Missions – Why do We Exsist2) "Mental models are deeply ingrained assumptions, generalizations, or even pictures of images that influence how we understand the world and how we take action." (p. 8) Core Values -- - How do we want to act3) "Building shared vision a practice of unearthing shared pictures of the future that foster genuine commitment and enrollment rather than compliance." (p. 9) -- What do we want the organization to be?4) "Team learning starts with dialogue, the capacity of members of a team to suspend assumptions and enter into genuine thinking together." (p. 10)5) Systems thinking - The Fifth Discipline that integrates the other 4.
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  • How often do students need to attend the after-school program in order for their reading tests scores to improve?A Logic Model would tell you that the after school program is an activity and improved reading scores is an outcome. It might tell you that attendance at the after school program is an intermediate outcome.students need to attend after-school programs at least 3 days per week for a minimum of 60 days, and the curricula must focus on love of reading and literacy, IN ORDER FOR test scores to rise”
  • HOSrivastva say that an organization is a miracle to be embraced rather than a problem to be solved. Appreciative Inquiry is a particular way of asking questions and envisioning the future that fosters positive relationships and builds on the basic goodness in a person, a situation, or an organization. In so doing, it enhances a system's capacity for collaboration and change.[2]The basic idea is to build organizations around what works, rather than trying to fix what doesn't. It is the opposite of problem solving. Instead of focusing on gaps and inadequacies to remediate skills or practices, AI focuses on how to create more of the exceptional performance that is occurring when a core of strengths is aligned. It opens the door to a universe of possibilities, since the work doesn't stop when a particular problem is solved but rather focuses on "What is the best we can be?" The approach acknowledges the contribution of individuals, in order to increase trust and organizational alignment. The method aims to create meaning by drawing from stories of concrete successes and lends itself to cross-industrial social activities.
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  • Non-Profit Program Planning and Evaluation

    1. 1. PROGRAM PLANNING<br /> & EVALUATION<br />Part I – Morning Session<br />Presented by<br />Center for Nonprofit Management<br />&<br />Kristina E. Jones, M.A., CFRE<br />President, J.K. Griffin & Associates<br />www.JKGriffin.com<br />(325) 672-1318<br />
    2. 2. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />NonProfit Management Certificate Program<br />Welcome!<br />About Our Sponsors<br />About Our Speaker<br />Housekeeping<br />Cell Phones<br />
    3. 3. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Our Agenda<br />Planning<br />Preparation<br />Myth Busters & 80/20<br />Types of Planning<br />Case Study<br />Stakeholder Considerations<br />Capacities & Lifecycle<br />Methods to Consider<br />Making Your Plan<br />
    4. 4. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Quotes<br />Lots of Good Reasons<br />Planning<br /> <br />“Good plans <br />shape good decisions. <br />That's why<br /> good planning <br />helps to make <br />elusive dreams <br />come true.”<br />Unknown<br />“If you are planning for a year, <br />sow rice; <br />if you are planning for a decade, <br />plant trees; <br />if you are <br />planning for a lifetime, <br />educate people” <br />Chinese Proverb<br />
    5. 5. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Basic Ingredients<br />Tie the Mission & Strategic Plan Together<br />Results & Success<br />Why Plan Programs?<br />Short Range Focus with Long Term Plan<br />Evaluate<br />Involve Stakeholders<br />Coordinate/<br />Collaborate <br />
    6. 6. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />When to Plan<br /><ul><li>Startup
    7. 7. Seeking Growth
    8. 8. Expanding Programs
    9. 9. Adding New Ones
    10. 10. Collaborating with Other Organizations
    11. 11. Annually
    12. 12. Major Change/Shift</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Asking Why & What<br />Why?<br /><ul><li> Why do we want to create this program?
    13. 13. Why does this fit with our mission?
    14. 14. Why are we doing this program?</li></ul>What?<br /><ul><li> What impact will this have on our mission?
    15. 15. What impact will this have on our community?
    16. 16. What resources will the program require?
    17. 17. What determines the program scope with the activities & deliverables?</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Definitions<br />Why Plan?<br /><ul><li> Understand, verify or increase the impact of products or services on customers/clients
    18. 18. Improve delivery mechanisms to be more efficient and less costly
    19. 19. Verify You ARE doing what you think you are doing or should be doing</li></ul>Planning Has Benefits…<br /><ul><li> Facilitate Management’s Thinking - Really
    20. 20. Produce Data/Verify Results
    21. 21. Produce valid comparisons between programs
    22. 22. Fully examine & describe effective programs</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Understand <br />So You Can Plan!<br /><ul><li>Planning and reviewing are the starting and ending points
    23. 23. Attention on the program's most critical challenges and opportunities
    24. 24. Insight into the future direction
    25. 25. Commitment to goals and activities</li></ul>A good planning system is <br />dynamic <br />and includes <br />all the significant players<br />
    26. 26. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Understand <br />So You Can Plan!<br />What is Program Evaluation?<br /><ul><li> From an Organization’s missions – identify several goals to accomplish mission
    27. 27. Organized methods to provide services to constituents
    28. 28. Evaluate usefulness to constituents</li></ul>Program Evaluation is carefully collecting information about a program or some aspect of a program in order to make necessary decisions about the program.<br />
    29. 29. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Organizational Context<br />Mission, Vision, Values<br />Strategic Plan<br />Annual Plan/Budget<br />Programs<br />
    30. 30. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Types of Planning<br />Program Planning<br /><ul><li> Program Design
    31. 31. Detail on Service Delivery Methods & Staffing to serve clients and communities.
    32. 32. Project Planning
    33. 33. Business Plans</li></ul>Strategic Planning<br />Addresses the Organization’s mission and overall strategies for fulfilling the mission.<br />Long-Range Planning<br />Sometimes contratest with SP – Assumes environment and activities will be stable.<br />Operational Planning<br />Plans for Implenting SP & accomplishing annual goals regarding program and other agency operations.<br />Source: J. Lewis, T. Packard, M. Lewis. (2007) Management of Human Service Programs<br />
    34. 34. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Types of Planning<br />Program Planning<br /><ul><li> Program Design
    35. 35. Detail on Service Delivery Methods & Staffing to serve clients and communities
    36. 36. Project Planning
    37. 37. Business Plans</li></ul>Strategic Planning<br />Addresses the Organization’s mission and overall strategies for fulfilling the mission.<br />Long-Range Planning<br />Sometimes contrast with SP – Assumes environment and activities will be stable.<br />Operational Planning<br />Plans for Implenting SP & accomplishing annual goals regarding program and other agency operations.<br />Source: J. Lewis, T. Packard, M. Lewis. (2007) Management of Human Service Programs<br />
    38. 38. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Process<br />Step 6<br />Step 2<br />Step 3<br />Step 4<br />Step 5<br />Step 1<br /><ul><li> What Kinds of Information are Needed to Make the Decision?
    39. 39. From What Sources Should Information Be Collected?
    40. 40. For What Purposes is the Planning Being Done?
    41. 41. When is Information Needed?
    42. 42. What Info Is Needed to Enlighten your Audience?
    43. 43. This is an example text.
    44. 44. Who Will Carry Out this Process?
    45. 45. This is an example text.
    46. 46. Can Information Be Collected in a Reasonable Fashion?
    47. 47. This is an example text.
    48. 48. This is an example text.
    49. 49. This is an example text.Strenghts & Weaknesses
    50. 50. This is an example text.
    51. 51. What Resources are Available to Collect Information?</li></ul>COMMUNICATE<br />“Being busy does not always mean real work.<br /> The object of all work is production or accomplishment<br />and to either of these ends there must be forethought,<br /> system, planning, intelligence, and honest purpose, as well as perspiration. <br />Seeming to do is not doing.”<br />Thomas Alva Edison<br />
    52. 52. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Managing the Non-Profit Org<br />What Is Our Mission?<br />What is our Plan?<br />Who Is Our Customer?<br />The Five <br />Drucker Questions<br />What are our Results?<br />What Does the Customer Value?<br />Source: P. Drucker (1990) <br />
    53. 53. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Program Design<br />Know your Programs<br /><ul><li>See Worksheet</li></ul>It’s All About the Mission<br />Create Your Own Path<br />
    54. 54. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Program Design<br />
    55. 55. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Too Stressing?<br />
    56. 56. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Don’t Worry – Be Happy<br />
    57. 57. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Myths<br />Useless Activity<br /><ul><li> Boring Data
    58. 58. Useless Conclusions
    59. 59. Scientific Validity
    60. 60. Master of the Obvious - Generalizations</li></ul>Proof<br /><ul><li> Success
    61. 61. Failure
    62. 62. No Need for Feedback</li></ul>Complexity<br /><ul><li> Must Be A Certain Way
    63. 63. Experts
    64. 64. Formality</li></ul>Source: Carter McNamara, PhD 1998<br />
    65. 65. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Myth Busting<br />Source: <br />http://digitalduckie.deviantart.com/art/Mythbusters-Slash-2-53952305<br />
    66. 66. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />What ME Worry?<br />Don’t worry…<br /> about what type of planning/evaluation you need or are doing<br />Worry about …<br />what you need to know to make program decisions<br />When to Worry!<br />Worry about…<br /> how to accurately collect data<br />Worry about…<br /> understanding the information<br />
    67. 67. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />20/80 Rule<br />The Rule<br /><ul><li> 20% Effort
    68. 68. Generates 80% of the Needed Results</li></ul>Vilfredo Pareto<br />1848-1923<br />Italian engineer, sociologist, economist, and philosopher <br />Source: <br />Google Images – Visit www.NoFear.com<br />
    69. 69. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />NO FEAR<br />
    70. 70. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Program Lifecycle<br />CCAT Core Capacity Assessment Tool©<br />
    71. 71. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Capacity Frameworks<br />
    72. 72. Social and Demographic Forces<br />Political and Regulatory Forces<br />Facilities<br />Human Resources<br />Structure<br />Rituals<br />History<br />Time<br />Technology<br />OrganizationalCulture<br />Beliefs<br />Language<br />Values<br />Finances/Funding<br />Program Design andModel<br />Economic Forces<br />Technological Forces<br />Key Resourcesthe one or more critically needed resourcesthat most directly support programs and services<br />Core Capacities Model<br />External Environment<br />Resources<br />Organization<br />Adaptive Capacity<br />the ability of a nonprofit organization to monitor, assess and respond to internal and external changes<br />Leadership Capacity<br />the ability of all organizational leaders to create and sustain the vision, inspire, model, prioritize, make decisions, provide direction and innovate, all in an effort to achieve the organizational mission<br />Management Capacity<br />the ability of a nonprofit organization to ensure the effective and efficient use of organizational resources<br />Technical Capacity<br />“the ability of a nonprofit organization to implement all of the key organizational and programmatic functions<br />Source: www.tccccat.com <br />
    73. 73. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Case Study<br />The <br />Model <br />College Counseling <br />Center<br />Questions<br /><ul><li> What are the real issues at stake?
    74. 74. With which viewpoint do you agree? Could you argue the opposing side?
    75. 75. If you were involved in the planning process, what steps would you follow? Who should be involved?
    76. 76. Would earlier planning procedures have prevented the conflict?
    77. 77. To what degree can the planning process be considered rational?</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Reframing<br />The Story of Four Friends <br />in Fredericksburg…<br />
    78. 78. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Reframing<br />Structural Frame - <br />Social Architecture & Organizational Design<br />Human Resource Frame - <br />How Characteristics of Organizations and People <br />Shape What they Do for One Another<br />Political Frame – <br />Power, Conflict & Coalition<br />Symbolic Frame - <br />Organizational Culture & Symbols<br />Source: L. Bolman, (2003) Reframing Organizations<br />
    79. 79. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Knowing Your Stakeholders & Create Your Planning Team<br />Need <br />as a Resource<br />Why Involve?<br />Affected by the Work<br />Customers<br />& Stakeholders<br />Insights<br />Sidelines<br />Have a Right<br />Stakeholder Prioritization<br />
    80. 80. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Social Capital<br />
    81. 81. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Social Capital<br /><ul><li>Defines Relationship
    82. 82. Based on Degrees of High or Low
    83. 83. Strong Ties vs Weak Ties
    84. 84. Charting
    85. 85. Individual
    86. 86. Program/Project
    87. 87. Organizational</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Systems Thinking<br />Personal Mastery<br />Mental<br />Models<br />Systems <br />Thinking<br />Team<br />Learning<br />Building<br />Shared<br />Vision<br />Source: P. Senge. (1990) Fifth Discipline<br />
    88. 88. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Systems Thinking<br /><ul><li>Systems thinking also needs
    89. 89. the disciplines of building shared vision,
    90. 90. mental models, team learning, and
    91. 91. personal mastery to realize its potential.
    92. 92. Building shared vision fosters a commitment to the long term.
    93. 93. Mental models focus on the openness needed to unearth shortcomings in our present ways of seeing the world.
    94. 94. Team learning develops the skills of groups of people to look for the larger picture beyond individual perspectives.
    95. 95. Personal mastery fosters the personal motivation to continually learn how our actions affect our world.</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Systems Thinking<br />Become a <br />Learning Organization…<br />
    96. 96. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Theory of Change<br />About<br /><ul><li>Popularized in 1990s to capture complex initiatives
    97. 97. Outcomes-based
    98. 98. Causal model
    99. 99. Articulate underlying assumptions</li></ul>Theory of Change<br />Links <br />outcomes and activities <br />to explain <br />HOW and WHY <br />the desired change is<br />expected to come <br />about<br />Best Utilized<br /><ul><li>Design a complex initiative and want to have a rigorous plan for success
    100. 100. Evaluate appropriate outcomes at the right time and the right sequence
    101. 101. Explain why an initiative worked or did not work, and what exactly went wrong</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Theory of Change<br />Beginning<br />May start with a program, <br />but are best when starting with a goal, <br />before deciding what <br />programmatic approaches<br />are needed<br />In the Middle<br />Requires justifications<br />at each step – <br />you have to articulate <br />the hypothesis about <br />why something will <br />cause something else<br />At the End<br />Requires<br />identifying <br />Indicators<br />You need to know <br />HOW WELL <br />a precondition needs <br />to be met in order to get <br />to the next goal. <br />
    102. 102. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Theory of Change<br />“SO THAT”<br />Chain<br />Create a Pathway of Change<br />Can be Mapped…<br />Linear or Causal<br />Sequentially or Simultaneously<br />Independent or Interrelated<br />Simple or Multiple Strategies<br />
    103. 103. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Appreciative Inquiry<br />Cycle of 4 Processes<br />DISCOVER: The identification of organizational processes that work well.<br />DREAM: The envisioning of processes that would work well in the future.<br />DESIGN: Planning and prioritizing processes that would work well.<br />DESTINY (or DELIVER): The implementation (execution) of the proposed design<br />Organizational Life Characteristics<br /><ul><li>Appreciative
    104. 104. Applicable
    105. 105. Provocative
    106. 106. Collaborative</li></ul>History<br /><ul><li>Adopted from work done by earlier action research theorists and practitioners
    107. 107. David Cooperrider of Case Western Reserve University and Suresh Srivastva in the 1980s</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Appreciative Inquiry<br />4-D Cycle<br />
    108. 108. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Appreciative Inquiry<br />4-I Model<br />
    109. 109. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Regarding Theories in Practice<br />Program Design & Accountability<br />Handout<br />
    110. 110. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Think About the Money<br />Projected Income<br />Projected Expenses<br />Gentlemen… <br />We are out of money. Therefore <br />we will have to think. Winston Churchill<br />It’s Much Better to <br />Plan Ahead & Know<br />Resources <br />& Program Impact<br />
    111. 111. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Think About the Money<br />Grants<br />-Local<br />-State<br />-Federal<br />Contracts<br />-Local Agencies<br />-State Agencies<br />-Federal Agencies<br />Revenue<br />Projection<br />Contributions<br />-Individuals<br />-Events<br />-In-Kind<br />Other Revenue<br /><ul><li>Fees
    112. 112. Interest Income
    113. 113. Endowment Income
    114. 114. Misc.</li></li></ul><li>Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Think About the Money<br />Personnel Related<br />Facility Related<br />Expense<br />Projection<br />Other Expenses<br />General Operating/Admin<br />
    115. 115. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />Make a New Plan Stan<br />Program Planning<br />Make a List of Tasks<br />Who Will be Involved<br />Create a Schedule<br />Prioritize the Tasks<br />What Skills Are Needed<br />Who is Responsible<br />Set Due Dates<br />Be Realistic<br />Seriously – <br />Be Realistic<br />
    116. 116. “It takes as much energy to wish as it does to plan” Eleanor Roosevelt<br />“Let our advance worrying becomeadvance thinking and planning” Winston Churchill<br />Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Closing Thoughts<br />
    117. 117. “All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today” Unknown<br />“Good fortune is what happens when opportunity meets with planning.” Thomas A Edison<br />Program Planning & Evaluation – Part 1<br />Closing Thoughts<br />
    118. 118. Program Planning & Evaluation – Part I<br />20/80 Rule<br />
    119. 119. PROGRAM PLANNING<br /> & EVALUATION<br />Part I – Morning Session<br />Presented by<br />Center for Nonprofit Management<br />&<br />Kristina E. Jones, M.A., CFRE<br />President, J.K. Griffin & Associates<br />www.JKGriffin.com<br />(325) 672-1318<br />

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