Intro to Grantwriting 2 2012 ppt

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This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and …

This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and tricks to write an effective grant. By the end of the class, you’ll have the necessary information to research and submit proposals.

Grants as a Fundraising Tool

Are you Ready


Identify Funders


Elements of A Grant

More in: Business , Education
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  • School of thought: Grants can not be writtenProposals are writtenGrants are given or receivedNew to writing grants or need a refresher?Introduction to Grant Writing is valuable for both beginners and for anyone who would like a refresher on the fundamentals of identifying funders and writing grants.This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and tricks to write an effective grant. By the end of the class, you’ll have the necessary information to research and submit proposals.
  • This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and tricks to write an effective grant. By the end of the class, you’ll have the necessary information to research and submit proposals.
  • This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and tricks to write an effective grant. By the end of the class, you’ll have the necessary information to research and submit proposals.
  • Government – contract, grant for services, bricks and mortar, DOL Wi$E Up, additional monies to mine your service statisticsService Fees – co-pays, tuition, registration, application feesCorporations – marketing, advertising underwriting or grantsIndividuals – small gifts, major gifts, estate/bequestsFoundations -- Independent, Operating or Community FoundationsWhat is the largest source of funding?
  • Example graph/chart.
  • Religion & Education – why do you think that is?
  • A sum of money given by an organization, esp. a government to be used for a particular purpose.10-15%
  • A sum of money given by an organization, esp. a government to be used for a particular purpose.10-15%
  • A sum of money given by an organization, esp. a government to be used for a particular purpose.Tell me what do you want to seek grant money to accomplish? Popcorn around the room.. Where does most of your revenue come from for your nonprofit now? Do you have five sources of funding?10-15%
  • See checklist – what’s your mission? Who can say it in 15 words or less.Quick – tell me your programsNeeds -
  • On the plan – do you have the infrastructureCAP Stimulus dollars
  • Start showing stacks of paper Government entitiesTypes: possibilities at all levels - federal/national, state/province, county, local governments and agenciesMotivations: need to address pressing social problemsStrategies for building relationships: - design programs of specific interest to funding agency - establish relationships with decision-makers and discuss proposal in advance of submitting - complete and submit applications thoroughly and in a timely way - engage local (to agency) advocates - counsel and other support - meet with public officials responsible for funding agency - be patient - obtaining government support can take time
  • CorporationsTypes: many types of corporate support - foundation, direct giving, executive discretionary funds, subsidiary or local site giving,in-kind gifts such as marketing support, research and development activities, or products neededMotivations: business focus, good corporate citizenship, enlightened self-interest, executive leadership interest, location, cause-relatedmarketing, employee interestsStrategies for building relationships: - establish relationships with employees: board & committee members, etc. - develop compelling reasons for corporate support that tie to corporate mission/vision - ensure research is comprehensive and effective - inquire / approach / qualify / discuss interests - write grant proposalsFoundationsTypes: several types: private, company-sponsored, community, operatingMotivations: community support, sociopolitical concerns, historical roles (e.g. philanthropic interests of founders), seed money for newprojects, tax advantagesStrategies for building relationships: - research foundation mission/vision/goals - analyze foundation guidelines - approach / inquire / develop personal relationships via person-to-person visits; confirm interest in receiving a proposal from Organization - develop, write, and package a request for supportExamples:Meadows Foundation, The Moody Foundation, Sid W. Richardson Foundation, Robert J. and Helen C. Kleberg Jr. Foundation, The Cullen Foundation, Hillcrest Foundation
  • ndent foundations dropped 3.2 percent in 2009 ◆Independent foundation assets rose 5.9 percent in the latest year, following a 19.2 percent plunge in 2008 ◆Corporate foundation giving rose 2.6 percent in 2009 ◆Corporate foundation assets dropped 5.1 percent in 2009, after a 7.2 percent decrease in 2008 ◆Giving by community foundations dropped 7.1 percent in 2009 ◆Community foundation assets slipped 0.3 percent in 2009, following a 12.5 percent fall in 2008
  • BusinessesTypes: neighborhood stores and businesses, banks, utilities, etc.Motivations: civic pride, good citizenship, good of the community, benefits to the businessStrategies for building relationships: - nominate local business owners/executives for board - establish a local business council - seek in-kind support that serves organizational need and thenprominently recognize the business and its contribution - ask a business to sponsor an aspect of the organizationClubs and associations of individualsTypes: service clubs, self-help associations, professional/trade associations, social clubsMotivations: specific interests of the club/association, community service, business/social concerns of membersStrategies for building relationships: - identify potential support in the community - join the organization if appropriate, or approach through a member - discover ways to educate the group about the cause and why it warrants their support - offer appropriate things for the group, e.g. meeting space, speakers, etc.Workplace solicitations (federated campaigns)Types: bestowing member-agency status on a nonprofit, leading to annual allocations; discretionary grants for various ventures/community-developed projects; sponsoring donor-option programs allowing individual employees to make on-the-job contributions Example: The United WayMotivations: demonstrates role as good community partner; because of payroll deductions, provides an efficient way for people to makedonations with encouragement of supervisors Strategies for building relationships: - join the local federation as a member agency - apply for discretionary grants - seek participation in a federated donor-option program – either an existing one or a new one made up of similar organizations*Religious organizationsTypes: national denominations, religious federated campaigns, local faith communities, grants-makers (primary support), institutions for which support is secondary to their missionsMotivations: religious reasons, concern for the public good, charity/compassion, extension of ministryStrategies for building relationships: - make initial connection locally, perhaps through staff or board of organization - determine and articulate a connection between needs and religious organization - approach targeted congregation/community through clergy or recognized lay leadership - if local support not available, inquire about regional or national denomination support; ask for a personal contact to approach - always respect these sources' religious motivations for giving*
  • Public – GovernmentEntititesPrivate – the citizen run sectorSometimes nonprofits are called the voluntary sector
  • “Whose Line Is It Anyway”
  • The lesson --- don’t make looking for grants harder than it should be…Take a break after this slide…
  • Share your sites…Don’t search on key
  • Texas Forest ServiceTexas Workforce CommissionTexas Commision on the Arts
  • $195 to $1295 a year19.95 to 179.95 a month$one day freeCan sign up for one month
  • Around a $100 a year
  • 990s of organizations
  • DEFINITION OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF GRANTS Common Types of Grants Listed below are of the most common types of grants made to nonprofit organizations and what they typically mean to the organization. Capital or Capital Campaign A capital grant provides support for the purchase of property, the construction of a facility, remodeling, expansion of a facility or purchase of equipment.Operating or General Support An operating grant provides support for the day-to-day costs of running the nonprofit organization. EndowmentSome nonprofit organizations have an endowment fund, which is a permanent annual source of income for the operating or project expenses of the organization. Unrestricted An unrestricted grant allows nonprofits to use the funds to support the organization where most needed. ProjectA project grant supports a specific activity. SeedA seed grant helps to jump-start a new organization, a new project or launch a capital campaign. Challenge or Matching A challenge or matching grant helps a nonprofit organization leverage additional dollars through a fundraising campaign. PledgeA promise to pay. Community Foundations are prohibited by IRS regulations from fulfilling previously made pledges. If you are aware of a donor who is considering making a pledge to your organization from their fund at the Community Foundation, they must first recommend to the Community Foundation that we make a pledge to your organization from their fund. Once we receive the recommendation from our donor, and it has been approved by our Board, we then advise you in writing of the donor’s intent. If we are not notified ahead of time, we are prohibited from fulfilling the pledge.
  • Find this on the 990 – or on the Foundation Center HandoutFoundation Profiles (cont.)Average Grant CalculationNumber of Grants GivenTotal Amount Grants MadeSubtract High & Low AmountsDivide by 2 less than “# of Grants” 23 Grants Made$2,540,771 GrantedLess $2,000,000 & $1,000 = $2,001,000Divided by 21 = $25,703
  • After School Care Art SuppliesSpecify difference of LOI and RFP – competititvevs sustaining
  • Need is not just the passion or the emotion – it’s the cold hard facts…In pairs – brainstorm ways to document the needAnalyzeDallas.orgFirstgov.govWho builds the project for the organization – experienced folks – Libraryspot.comCollaborations such as our grantbook social network
  • Strategically add program/project to budgetApplication deadlines – does the funder accept unsolicited applications?
  • Award guidelines examples – Expend money – and reimbursed with documentation client meets parametersClients must be within a certain % of the poverty levelCould be timelinesHire staff at a certain pay level -- true of construction based grantsConsider subcrontracting to HUB based businessesProper publicity
  • Monthly, quarterly or an annualMay be financial reports and/or statistical client reportsEvaluation – Easy enough as a pre-test/post-testMore intensive in having an outside evaluator come in and do focus group studies, or higher statistical surveying
  • Objectives for instruction and expected results and/or skills developed from learning.
  • Objectives for instruction and expected results and/or skills developed from learning.
  • Evaluation ResultsService OutcomesGrowth of ServicesWaiting List/DemandSuccess StoriesAffiliationsSignificant wardsProven ExpertiseBoard Memebers1 of a Kind ServicesRelevant GrantsMedia CoverageStrong Community Support
  • Objectives for instruction and expected results and/or skills developed from learning.
  • Objectives for instruction and expected results and/or skills developed from learning.
  • Objectives for instruction and expected results and/or skills developed from learning.
  • Requires 350 –400 hours (federal)Requires 200 –250 hours (state)Private – if you are fast and can shut off the world – I say figure 2-3 hours for every written pageFor public sector – look for pre-proposal requests/public meetings
  • New to writing grants or need a refresher?Introduction to Grant Writing is valuable for both beginners and for anyone who would like a refresher on the fundamentals of identifying funders and writing grants.This practical class covers types of foundations and grants, the basics of public and private sector research and grant seeking, checklist of information you'll need for most proposals, and tips and tricks to write an effective grant. By the end of the class, you’ll have the necessary information to research and submit proposals.

Transcript

  • 1. INTRO TOGRANTWRITINGKristina E. Jones, M.A., CFREwww.StrongerOrganizations.com s (888) ORG-STROng
  • 2. Build a Social Network www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 3. Objectives  Grants as a Fundraising Tool  Are you Ready  Identify Funders  Elements of A Grant www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 4. Five Sources of FundingGovernment Service Fees Corporations Individuals Foundations www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 5. Who Gives the Money $290.89 Billion in 2010Source: AAFRC Giving USA 2011 Individuals 73% Bequests 8% Foundations Corporation 14% s 5% www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 6. Who Receives the Money160140120100 80 35 60 14 100.63 40 9 2 5 8 8 20 2 11 5 22.83 24.24 26.49 33 41.67 0 2.12 4.2 1 6.66 13.28 15.77 Billions % www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 7. Grants  A sum of $ given by an organization for a particular purpose.  Grants comprise 10-15% of philanthropic giving.  Government, Corporations, and Foundations are not just "sitting around" to randomly give “free money” away. www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 8. Why are YOU Here?  A sum of $ given bY an Organization for a particular pUrpose.  GraNts comprisE _______% of philanthropic giving.  GovErnment, Corporations, and FounDations are not just "sitting around" to randomly give “free MONEY” away. www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 9. Why are YOU Here?  A sum of $ given bY an OrgaUnization for a particular prpose.  Grats coNmprisE 10-1E5%f Dphilanthropic giving.  Govrnment, CorMONEY” porations, and Founations are not just "sitting around" to randomly give “free away. www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 10. Is Your Organization Ready? Organization Established  Mission  Programs  Needs www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 11. Know Thyself What is Our Mission Who is What is Our Our Plan Customer 5 Drucker Questions What What Are Does The Our Customer Results Value www.StrongerOrganizations.com Source: P. Drucker (1990)
  • 12. Tips from the Pros "If you dont know where you are going, you will wind up somewhere else." Source: Yogi Berra www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 13. Case Statement www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 14. Sources of Grants Government Entities www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 15. Sources of Grants Corporations Foundations www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 16. Types of Foundations #/Types of Foundations Independent Community 68,508 737 89% 1% Corporate 2,733 4% Operating 4,567 6% Source: The Foundation Center, Foundation Yearbook, 2011 www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 17. Types of Foundations Total Giving in 2010 In Billions Community 4.2 Independent 9% 32.8 72% Corporate 4.7 10% Operating 4.2 9% Source: The Foundation Center, Foundation Yearbook, 2011 www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 18. More Sources of Grants Businesses Clubs & Associations Workplace Solicitations Religious Organizations www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 19. Finding Grants Public Sector Private Sector www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 20. The SectorsPublic Sector Private Sector Specific  Diverse Fund All  Fund Partial  Cost  Higher for Capital Reimbursement  Lower for  Admin Costs Operations Look for RFPs  Connected Independent  Find your Paper Relationship Connection  Personal www.StrongerOrganizations.com Relationship
  • 21. Where to Find Grants… www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 22. Where to Find Grants… www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 23. Finding Grants Multiple Sites to Research Be Intentional to Find Your Best Prospects www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 24. Finding GrantsTexas. gov – search Grants www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 25. Finding GrantsGrants.gov – search Grants www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 26. Finding GrantsCFDA.gov www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 27. Finding GrantsFoundationCenter.org www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 28. Finding GrantsDallaslibrary2.org/government/grants.php www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 29. Finding Grantsfic-ftw.foundationcenter.org/ www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 30. Finding GrantsGuidestar.Org www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 31. Funders Priorities? Capital/Capital Campaign Operating/General Matching Support Seed Endowment Project Unrestricted www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 32. Tips For Request Amount Take an average either of all gifts or of the top 5 largest and 5 smallest gifts given by a Funder… Source: General Fundraising Advice www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 33. Tips For Request Amount If you ask for more than the Funder has historically given… then you and the Funder better be pretty Source: General Fundraising Advice good friends www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 34. Grants Process Need Evaluation Project Reporting Research Implementation Application & Administration Funder’s Choice www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 35. Grants Process • Organizational Project Need • Project • Assessment Development of Capability • Collaborations Need www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 36. Grants Process Application • Funder Identification • Letter of • Proposal & Inquiry Budget • Formal Application Research www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 37. Grants Process Implementation • Funders Review & Administration Application • Follow Award • Award Offered Guidelines or Declined Funder’s Choice www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 38. Tips from Experience Always contact the funder for feedback if your proposal is declined…it helps future Source: Kristina Jones proposals and countless others… www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 39. Grants Process Evaluation • Meet Deadlines • Project & Outcomes Reporting www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 40. Tips for Success Request to be assigned to a program officer… Source: The Grantsmanship Institute Training (2001) www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 41. Proposal Contents Cover Executive Letter Summary Proposal Appendices Narrative www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 42. Cover Letter Signed by Org & Project Total $ Commitment Special Highest Ends ActivelyPurpose Benefit Requested from Board Elements Authority www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 43. Proposal Contents Cover Executive Letter Summary www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 44. Executive Summary Mission Vision/Philosophy Brief History Program Description Description of Clients www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 45. Executive Summary Total Budget Location Demographics Staff Service Statistics www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 46. WOW! To make a point, is to be blunt, which is pointless… - Bob McMahan What is your WOW? www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 47. Tips from Funders If I can’t understand the title, I won’t fund it… Source: Whitney Tilt, Nat. Fish & Wildlife http://www.squidoo.com/Grant- Writing-Tips www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 48. Tips from Funders "If you havent told us what you want by the end of the third paragraph, chan ces are youre not going to get Source: John West, Phillips Petroleum it." Fdn http://www.squidoo.com/Grant- Writing-Tips www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 49. Proposal Contents Cover Executive Letter Summary Proposal Narrative www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 50. Proposal Narrative Organization/Program History Problem or Needs Statement Project Description www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 51. Proposal Narrative Timetable Personnel Description Project Budget www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 52. BudgetGrants Contracts• Local • Local• State • State• Federal • Federal RevenuesContributions Other Revenues• Individuals • Fees• Events • Interest Income• In-Kind • Endowment Income www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 53. BudgetPersonnel Facility• Salaries • Rent/Mortgage• Fringe Benefits • Utilities• Consultants/Contractors • Furnishings & Maintenance ExpensesGeneral Operating/Admin Other• Executive/Management Staff • Equipment & Supplies• Accounting & Audit • Travel/Mileage• Fundraising • Marketing www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 54. Proposal Narrative Goals, Objectives, Outputs, Outcomes Evaluation & Future Plans Reporting and Recognition www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 55. Tips from Writers “If your Grandmother reads it and doesn’t understand it – it’s likely your Source: Classroom funder won’t Experience with The either” Grantsmanship Center (2001) www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 56. Proposal Contents Cover Executive Letter Summary Proposal Appendices Narrative www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 57. Appendices IRS Determination Letter Annual Report, Letters of Texas Secretary of State Letter Support, Brochures, Statistics Most Recent Audit or Financial List of Board of Directors Report Most Recent IRS 990 www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 58. Proposal Contents Cover Executive Letter Summary Proposal Appendices Narrative www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 59. Tips from Reviewers Follow the guidelines for binding… don’t staple it or put it in a bound book if the funder requests Source: Kristina Jones and anyone who has otherwise been responsible for accepting proposals www.StrongerOrganizations.com
  • 60. Create a Grants Plan Source: www.StrongerOrganizations.com Calvin & Hobbes
  • 61. Grants PlanFunding Goal Q1, Q2, Q3, Source Assignmen DeadlineProject Amount Q4 t (Actions, Person Responsibl e) State Federal Corporations Foundations Businesses Service Clubs Workplace Solicitations/UW www.StrongerOrganizations.com Religious Organizations
  • 62. INTRO TOGRANTWRITING Q&AKristina E. Jones, M.A., CFREwww.StrongerOrganizations.com s (888) ORG-STROng