Unilever
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Unilever

on

  • 328 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
328
Views on SlideShare
328
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Unilever Unilever Document Transcript

  • HISTORY - UNILEVER • Lever brothers is founded by WILLIAMHESKETH LEVER in 1890 • Key player in food & householdproduct industry • Historically grew through acquisitions INTRODUCTION LEVER BROTHERS, THE OLD NAME OFUNILEVER CHANGED INTO UNILEVERAFTER THE MERGER OF LEVER BROTHERS& MARGARINE UNIE IN 1930UNILEVER IS A MULTI NATIONAL COMPANYIT IS ONE OF THE LARGEST CONSUMERGOODS COMPANIES IN THE WORLDITS BRANDS ARE ON SALE IN 151COUNTRIES CONT…. UNILEVER DOESN’T RETAILUNDER ITS OWN NAME BUTWITH BRAND NAMES LIKE SURFEXCEL,LIPTON,SUNSILK ETC…TODAY UNILEVER EMPLOYEES179,000 PEOPLE IN 100COUNTRIES WORLDWIDE MISSION STATEMENT Unilever's mission is to add Vitality to life.We meet everyday needs for nutrition;hygiene and personal care with brandsthat help people feel good, look good andget more out of life. LOGO & SLOGAN This is the logo of “UNILEVER” “ SLOGAN” “ FEEL GOOD, LOOK GOODAND GET MORE OUT OFLIFE…” MANAGEMENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS CONT… “PATRICK CESCAU”CHIEF EXECUTIVEOFFICER (CEO) OF UNILEVER UNILEVER PAKISTAN UNILEVER PAKITAN FORMERLYLEVER BROTHERS WASESTABLISHED IN PAKISTAN IN 1958FIRST SITE IN PAKISTAN WAS RAHIM YAR KHANLARGEST FMCG COMPANY NOWOPERATING AT SIX LOCATIONS INPAKISTAN GENERAL INFO… NO. OF EMPLOYEES 1677 SHARES 13,293, 869 SHARE HOLDERS 4171 STOCK EXCHANGE KARACHI REVENUE 40.187 BILLIONS (2008) MR.EHSAN A.MALIK CEO IN PAKISTAN PORTFOLIO ANALYSIS FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • BCG MATRIXSWOT ANALYSIS BCG MATRIX STARS High growth rate & high market shareLuxSunsilkWall’sFair & lovelyRafhanEnergile CASH COWS • Low growth rate & high market share • Surf excel • Ponds FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • • Lipton • Close up • Blue band • Lifebuoy soap • Rexona • Knorr DOGS Low growth rate & low marketshareWheelSupreme teaLifebuoy shampoo QUESTION MARKS High growth rate & low marketshareClear shampooRinComfort SWOT Analysis: STRENGTHS Strong company imageStrong brand portfolioSuccess of the sloganQuantity & varietyEffective & attractive packagingHigh quality man power Solid base of the company Innovative aspects Corporate behaviour Health & personal careproductsHelp people getting more outof life WEAKNESSES High prices of productsSubstitutes productsPolicy of spending for thesocial responsibilityLack of control in the market CONT… Dual leadershipDecrease in revenuesReduced spending for research& development OPPORTUNITIES Changing life style of peopleNew marketsIncrease the volume of productionFocus on R&DLow income consumers CONT… Help in improving people diet &daily livesAXEIGLO THREATS Competitors(P&G,)Political effectsLegislative effectEnvironmental effectEconomic crisesObstacle faced CONT… Change in life style of peopleChance for price war Increase in production & labour cost COMPETITIVE STRATEGY FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • Due to slow performance in emergingmarkets as compared to competitorsunilever adopt “GROWTH STRATEGY”Reduced portfolio to 400 brandsFocus on R&D & innovative productGrowth through acquisitionsBut this strategy failed in 2004 duefailure in advertising & marketing effortReported net loss of 318M dollars CONT… So what’s next???Then unilever adopt two strategies3 . R e o r g a n i z e o r g a n i z a t i o n a l s t r u c t u r e t o focus on needs and wants of consumers &brand management4 . I m p l e m e n t u n i l e v e r b e l i e v e r s , p r o d u c t & brand extensions, use advertisement thatconnects with consumer needs & increaseconsumer focus on health & nutritionproducts PRODUCT OF FOCUS • SURF EXCEL • It is the oldest detergent • To be present in Pakistan • Since 1960.It believes • That children must be • free to experience their • LIFE for themselves… FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • PRODUCT SURF EXCELAdvanceTropicalSmall & mightyAutomaticBlue detergentQuick wash CONT… Quality: Removal of stain 10/10reflects its qualityBrand name: Strong brandnamePackaging: attractive, colourful& uniqueConvenience product RANGE OF PRODUCT PRICE 2kg 1kg 500g 100g 60g 25gRs405 Rs210 Rs115 Rs20 Rs10 Rs05 2kg 1kg 500g 100g 60g 25g Rs405 Rs210 Rs115 Rs20 Rs10 Rs05 CONT… Its prices are comparativelylow as compared to itscompetitors like ArielMarket skimming strategyDiscounts: e.g: 10% on 500g &20% on 1000g pack PLACE CONT… Great distribution & availabilityCovering throughout PakistanDistribution channel PROMOTION Promotion is mainly throughAds,billboardsPublic relation(parks,art club &games for children) Sales promotion MARKET SEGMENTATION DEMOGRAPHICALLY: Surf excel tropical Surf excel blue surf excel automatic Surf excel advance GEOGRAPHICALLY Surf excel quick wash TARGETING Surf excel topical targeted thesegment which are moreconscious about fragranceSurf excel blue targeted those whocare about their fabricsSurf excel automatic has lowleather formula use in onlywashing machines CONT… Surf excel advance targeted thehigh classSurf excel quick wash targetedhilly areas FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • POSITIONING Positioning of surf excel is due to:Brand nameHigh qualityAttractive packingRemoves stains 10/10Dirt is good(every child has theright to play and discover his ownworld) ----x---- What are the Failed products of unilever in Pakistan? Relevant answers: What are the failed products in Pakistan market? RC cola and Nissan Pakistan are the failed products in apkistan Why do Most Products Fail? 3 Techniques to Leverage Hidden Needs Tweet 18 inShare Many managers want their organizations to develop breakthrough products and ask their R&D departments to come up with the equivalent of the iPod or iPhone. Unfortunately, the reality is that product failure is more common than success. So what are the reasons for product failure and what steps can companies take to avoid it? PUBLISHED: DECEMBER 13, 2011 | BY: KEITH GOFFIN & CHRIS VAN DER HOVEN | 0 COMMENTS AND 3 REACTIONS IN: STRATEGIES The first lesson from research is that failure rates are high. For example, a recent survey found that of the hundreds of new food and beverage products introduced in the last few years in the US, 90% had failed (and were withdrawn from supermarkets within 3 months of launch). Food and drinks is a particularly challenging market but research in other sectors—from automobiles, to pharmaceuticals, to chemical products—shows that product failure is a (far too) common phenomenon. Avoiding Product Failure Cranfield School of Management gives you a proven framework for making your organisation more innovative through its Innovation Management: Strategy and Implementation programme. Products sometimes fail because they do not function correctly. For example, although most people think of Apple as the archetypal innovative company, it has had its failures, notably the Apple Newton personal digital assistant that promised but failed to recognize handwriting. Similarly, both Unilever and Procter & Gamble have introduced ‘power’ washing powders to remove stains but which damaged fabrics. Products must function correctly but research shows that this is a necessary but not sufficient condition for product success. Product differentiation is critical, that is products must stand out from the crowd. FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • Truly differentiated products, which offer unique features that provide real customer benefit, have an 80% chance of success, whereas ‘me-too’ products that replicate competitors’ features have only a 20% chance. Creating breakthrough products requires a deep understanding of customers’ needs. Making Market Research Work Most organizations use traditional methods of market research—they carry out customer interviews, they undertake surveys and conduct focus groups. For example, over 200,000 focus groups were conducted in the US last year. However, traditional market research relies on direct questions, where customers are asked what type of features they would like in future products. Such questions are inadequate because most customers struggle to articulate their needs, or simply ask for improvements to existing features. Traditional market research traps companies into developing incremental, me-too products (with little chance of success). Traditional market research traps companies into developing incremental, me-too products (with little chance of success). To get round this, leading companies are increasingly using sophisticated methods from psychology and anthropology to uncover customers’ hidden needs—those needs that they are unable to articulate or have not even recognized themselves. Hidden Needs Analysis Hidden needs analysis is the name given to a collection of tools and techniques for probing deeper than traditional market research. The main ones are: Repertory Grid Analysis Ethnographic Market Research Lead User Groups. Each of these techniques has major advantages compared to traditional market research tools and, when used in combination, they are very effective at uncovering customers’ hidden needs. Repertory grid analysis was developed by psychologists as a way to understand how individuals think and to uncover their socalled cognitive maps. This technique is ideal for developing new product ideas. It uses indirect questions and stimulates users to compare and contrast their experiences of existing products. Through the process of comparing and contrasting, customers’ hidden needs are revealed. Companies that have used repertory grid analysis in their market research include Biersdorf (the Hamburg-based manufacturer of global brands such as Nivea), Hewlett-Packard, and the IT service-provider Equant. Another very effective technique for identifying hidden needs isethnographic market research. This is based on the scientific methods developed in anthropology for understanding culture. When applied in a market research scenario, ethnography unveils both latent customer needs and the cultural drivers of product usage (be they national or customer segment-related). A common approach is to film customers and users using existing products and then conduct a deep analysis of what was observed and what customers said. Often it is the contradictions between what customers say they do and what they actually FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143
  • do, which provide the most insights. There is a systematic methodology for ethnographic market research and companies that have successfully applied it include Agilent, Bosch, Nokia, Nissan, and Unilever. Lead users are customers who use products under far more demanding conditions than the majority. For example, to understand how better hygiene-related products could be developed for the operating room, 3M studied the requirements of field hospitals in combat zones. In demanding situations users often have to modify products to work around their limitations. By looking at such modifications, ideas for product improvements for the broader market can be obtained. Texas Instruments, Lego, and Cobra International (a world beating manufacturer of windsurfing equipment) have all made good use of the lead user approach. Hidden Needs: Techniques and Organizational Issues As more companies adopt hidden needs approaches, the Cranfield School of Management is studying how they can be most effectively applied. The Cranfield research has identified two issues: Firstly, different techniques such as ethnographic market research and repertory grid technique are most effective when applied in parallel. In this way the unique insights from each technique can be contrasted to gain a deeper market understanding. The second key point from the research is that organizational barriers need to be overcome, if new methods of market research are to be adopted. Ironically, studies have shown that marketing departments in some companies are reluctant to adopt hidden needs approaches, as they view them as a threat to their status as ‘market experts’. So in some companies it is R&D that is driving for new approaches to understanding the market. By Keith Goffin, Professor of Innovation & New Product Development and the Course Director for Innovation Management: Strategy & Implementation THE END…!! ANY DOUBTS ORQUESTIONS??? THANK YOU……!!! FROM: MUHAMMAD QAISER Roll # 1004143