7/7 slave labor in begging & sales
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7/7 slave labor in begging & sales

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    7/7 slave labor in begging & sales 7/7 slave labor in begging & sales Document Transcript

    • Human TraffickingOverviewSex Trafficking in the U.S.Labor Trafficking in the U.S.Agriculture & FarmsDomestic WorkHostess & Strip ClubsRestaurants & Food ServiceFactoriesPeddling & Begging RingsHospitality IndustryOther IndustriesRecognizing the SignsInternational TraffickingTrafficking FAQsState-by-State ResourcesCalendar of EventsThe NHTRC Human Trafficking Report a Tip Access Training Resources Map Get Involved ContactMembers of traveling sales crews are oftenforced to sell items, such as this magazine,without pay.“These schemes are nothing short of theft of the labor and the wages ofhundreds, if not thousands, of young people.”– Robert Abrams, former Attorney General of New York.Victims of humantraffickinghave beenfoundinsales crews orpeddlingandbeggingrings, where they work longhours eachdaysolicitingmoney or sellingproducts suchas magazine subscriptions,trinkets, or cleaningproducts.The controller or manager confiscates all or most of the victim’searnings andthe victims may be dependent onthe controller fortransportationandhousing. Beggingandpeddlingrings may includeU.S. citizens, immigrants, adults, or children.Sales crews typically recruit U.S. citizenyouthages 18to 25, sometimes younger, withpromises oftravel, acare-free life, andthe ability to make alot of money. A "crew" consists of anaverage of 3 to40 youth, under the directionof amanager, who moves the crewfromcity to city every fewweeks.Crewmembers receive asmall daily stipendof $8to $15 or less , to cover the cost of meals andpersonal items. Violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, pressure tactics, andabandonment inunfamiliar cities are common.Aftergraduatinghigh school, ayoungmanwas approachedby arecruiterwho toldhimhe couldtravel aroundthe US andmake $350 aweeksellingskincare products. The youngmanjoinedacrewtravelinginavanaroundthe Midwest. The crew leaders chargedexorbitant fees fortransportation,lodging, food, andset fines if they were late orfailedto meet sales quotas. If acrew memberfailedtomake the quotaforseveral days, he orshe was deniedfood, andsometimes abandonedwithout anymoney. Afterbeingassaultedby acrew leader, the youngmandecidedthat he neededto leave. Hecalledafriendfromapay phone, who helpedhimcontact the National HumanTraffickingResourceCenter. (NHTRC).*Basedoncalls receivedby the National HumanTraffickingResource Center. Identifyingdetailshave beenchangedto protect confidentiality.When does it become trafficking?Peddlingandbeggingrings andsales crews become traffickingwhenthe employer uses force, fraudand/or coercionto maintaincontrol over the worker andto cause the worker to believe that he or shehas no other choice but to stay andcontinue to work. Commonmeans of control include:Force–Isolationandremoval fromfamiliar surroundings;physical andsexual abuse;abandonmentfor non-compliance.Fraud–False promises of anopportunity to travel the country andearnmoney quickly;misrepresentationthe work, workingconditions, wages, or immigrationbenefits;visafraud.Coercion –Elaborate systems of rewards andpunishments;sales or beggingquotas;verbal andpsychological abuse;exploitationof aforeignnational’s unfamiliarity withthe language, laws andPeddling Rings, Sales Crews, andBegging RingsE-mail PrintShareSIGN UP BLOG SEARCH LOGINABOUT USABOUT US WHAT WE DOWHAT WE DO HUMAN TRAFFICKING TAKE ACTIONTAKE ACTION RESOURCESRESOURCES MEDIAMEDIA GIVEGIVEconverted by Web2PDFConvert.com
    • Top ResourcesHumanTraffickingNational HumanTraffickingResourceCenterSex TraffickingintheU.S.RecognizingtheSignsTheVictimsClient Quotescustoms of the US;sexual harassment;threats of harmto the victimor victim’s family.*The above list is not comprehensive orcumulative. One element of force, fraudorcoercionmay bepresent, ormany..VulnerabilitiesRemoval from Familiar Settings–Youthandyoungadults who sign-upfor asalescrewjob arequickly removedfromfamiliar surroundings andare kept isolatedfromtheir social support network offriends andfamily. If acrewmember is non-compliant withcrewrules or fails to make daily salesquotas, he or she risks beingleft behindby the crewinanunfamiliar city withno money to get home.Targeted Recruitment from Economically Marginalized Populations–Beggingandpeddlingrings oftentarget immigrants who are vulnerable to exploitationdue to language barriers andalack of alternative job options. Inone case, traffickers recruiteddeaf andmute Mexicans to sell $1trinkets inNewYork City. Salescrews target youthandyoungadults, many withlowlevels of incomeandformal education. Oftenvictims have ahistory of or are vulnerable to homelessness.Lack of Labor Protections–Salescrews are structuredso that crewmembers are classifiedasindependent contractors, thus shieldingthe companies fromregulation, taxes andliability.Furthermore, as outdoor sellers crewmembers are exempt frommost federal andstate minimumwageandovertime requirements. State level investigations andprosecutions are oftenhamperedby the factthat crewmembers are rarely allowedto work intheir home state, andthe crews move frequently fromstate to state.Statistics SnapshotSalescrewoperators are estimatedto cumultatively earn$50 millionannually. Crewmembers maytake inas muchas $100 per day, but are allottedbarely enoughto cover meals, usually $8to $15 perday. They typically don’t have enoughmoney to buy abus ticket home.For resources onhumantraffickinginsalescrews, click here.ContactPolaris ProjectP.O. Box 53315Washington, D.C. 20009Tel: 202-745-1001Fax: 202-745-1119Email Polaris ProjectWhat We DoNational Human Trafficking HotlinePolicyAdvocacyClient ServicesTraining and TechnicalAssistancePublic Outreach and CommunicationsFellowship ProgramConnect Search Join Our NetworkPrivacy Policy | Copyright 2013 Polaris Project.Sitemap Loginsearch the site enter your emailMore Client Stories"Many things have changed forme since coming to PolarisProject. I now believe it’s nevertoo late to begin again."converted by Web2PDFConvert.com