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Corporate Social Media Engagement - Using Social Media for Good Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Corporate Social Media Engagement – UsingSocial Media for GoodNovember 2011Helmut Kazmaier | helmut.kazmaier@stimmt.chStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 1
  • 2. About Stimmt AG Stimmt is a consultancy helping companies to optimize their touch points from a customer’s perspective in order to stand out in a market, where products and services become more and more indistinguishable. We are 15 people based in Zurich, operating for 13 years. Helmut Kazmaier Partner Electrical Engineer, with Stimmt for more than 5 yearsStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 2
  • 3. Disclaimer, hopefully not spoiler – just to manage expectations Universal Truth and Definitive Guide to Social Media SuccessBut there will be a lot of food for thought, some answers, some more questions andsome guidance and hands on advice.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 3
  • 4. ContentsWhy Social Media - Motives for engagementThe Social Media Community – Rules of engagementThe Social Media Endeavour – Some things to considerDiscussionStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 4
  • 5. Why are you engaging in social media?Many corporations are engaging in social media. Some see it even as a givennecessity. On the other hand there are questions about the benefits and ROI, forwhich there are not always satisfying answers. What’s your take?Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 5
  • 6. Why do companies engage in social media? COMPANY CUSTOMER MONOLOGUE? DIALOGUE! Marketing Get more attention Sell products Provide Customer Service Company Image building Social Media Get ideas from customers Respond to crisis Learn more about customers Customers Strengthen relationship Enable customers to engage with customers with your brandThis list may not be exhaustive but gives an overview of some obvious motives toengage in social media. The motives are not disparate but in most cases related.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 6
  • 7. Motives | «Buzz»: Get the (online) world to notice you – and be found more easily LikesBacklinks to Sharescompany websites: commentsGood for SEO Friends of followers …Company Challenge: Get people to spread your message … Followers Inherent goal to all social media activity: Increase your reach and use social communities as multipliers of your message. As a result more and more links point to the company and its content. Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 7
  • 8. Example of «Buzz» Marketing | The viral campaign Source: http://mashable.com/2010/07/27/old-spice- sales/ Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=owGykVbfgUEThe archetype of a successful viral campaign: Old Spice. What sets it apart fromclassic advertisement is not just the humor, but the interactivity with the audience.Questions of fans were answered with more than 180 personalized videos.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 8
  • 9. Example of «Buzz» Marketing | Copying successful campaigns istempting and sometimes worksSource: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ArIj236UHsThe Harold B. Lee Library grasped and copied the essence of the Old Spicecampaign and successfully applied it to their context.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 9
  • 10. Example of «Buzz» Marketing | Copying successful campaigns istempting but often failsSource: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jfA3zDG1pA&feature=player_embeddeCisco copied some aspects of the Old Spice campaign but couldn’t transfer the basicconcept to their products.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 10
  • 11. Motives | A different kind of marketing: Social Media Marketing Corporate Ecosystem Sales … Funnel •  Data mining •  Lead generation •  Direct marketing $$$ … •  Call for actionVery closely related to the previous motif «buzz» social media marketing try’s tosteer potential customers into the corporate ecosystem and into the sales funnel.One advantage: You can easily monitor the stages of your sales funnel andmeasure the effectiveness of your marketing efforts.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 11
  • 12. Motives | Social Media Marketing / Inbound Marketing Free Offers Blog Webinars Case Studies Tools like grader.com Educational resources at Inbound marketing University YouTube videos ... Source: http://www.hubspot.com/ Goal: Create value for (potential) customers. Result: Buzz and sales.Hubspot is a pioneer of inbound marketing, since that is what they are selling.They provide lots of free tools and information of value to customers and thuseducate them about the benefits of their offering – without actually marketing it.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 12
  • 13. Motives | Management’s favorite: Directly hit the top line Source: http://mashable.com/2009/12/08/dell-twitter-sales/Source: http://twitter.com/#!/delloutletDell very successfully used their Twitter channel @delloutlet to point users to theirspecial sales offers.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 13
  • 14. Motives | Shape your image and build your brand Challenge: Get people engaged with your brand and your topics.Source: http://www.aboutmcdonalds.com/mcd/csr/blog.htmlMcDonalds portray their CSR efforts. This resembles the classic communicationmodel where the company sets and controls the message. Interactivity bycommenting is possible, but – in this example - not heavily used though.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 14
  • 15. Motives | Image blogs – are they really social? About JNJ BTW Everyone else is talking about our company, so why can’t we? There are more than 120,000 people who work for Johnson & Johnson and its operating companies. I’m one of them, and through JNJ BTW, I will try to find a voice that often gets lost in formal communications. This is a big step for us as a company. Anyone working for a large corporation will appreciate that there are many internal limitations on what we say and how we say it. I’ve been reading blogs for only a few months now, but already it’s clear to me how important it is not just to watch, but to join in productively. Doing that will take some unlearning of old habits and traditional approaches to communicating — and I will have to find my own voice. [...] About the Editor Margaret Gurowitz I’m a member of the Johnson & Johnson Corporate Communication department and, while you can always find me blogging over at the Company’s Kilmer House blog. I’m very happy to be taking over as the editor of JNJBTW for the time being. Source: http://jnjbtw.com/about-jnj-btw/Johnson&Johnson uses its blog to show another, more personal side of thecompany. The number of comments imply though, that it is still rather amonologue than a dialogue.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 15
  • 16. Motives | Crisis management - often considered to late or: Howbuzz can turn against you Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToGK3-2tZz8 Challenge: Benefit from a reputation as a respected and trustworthy community member and handle the crisis quickly and transparently.Being attacked by Greenpeace regarding the use of palm oil, Nestlé fought againstthe allegations with censorship and legal measure. A practice not taken very wellby the community which amplified the crisis massively.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 16
  • 17. Motives | Crisis management – Swiss used social media to informstranded passengers during the volcano eruption in IcelandSource:http://anewkindofmarketing.utalkmarketing.com/how-swiss-air-is-harnessing-the-power-of-social-media-to-inform-stranded-passengers/Swiss Airlines’s use of social media is a good example in many ways: Theysupported their customers through the crisis fast and transparently and exceededexpectations. Their efforts were well noticed and used as a show case whichgenerated buzz and had positive impact on the image of Swiss.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 17
  • 18. Motives | Community building - Strengthen relationship withcustomersSource: http://social.ford.com/ Challenge: Build and maintain a – ideally self- organizing and self-sustaining - community around a topic related to your offering. Also: Do your customers allow your brand to interface with their lives like that?Ford offers a platform where their customers can share stories, pictures, videos orin general a sense of community and belonging.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 18
  • 19. Motives | Community building – connecting customers at thepremises of your brand Challenge: Create an offering that motivates yourSource: http://nikerunning.nike.com target group to interact in the long run. You must provide noticeable added value for them to do so.Nike offers a platform for their customers to bond and share their experiencesaround their hobby. At the same time they built a strong motif to buy Nikeequipment in order to be part of that community.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 19
  • 20. Motives | Community building – not just a B2C topicSource: http://apps.facebook.com/visabusiness/Like Nike Visa built a community that supports their customers to reach theirgoals. This time it’s not about a hobby but actual business.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 20
  • 21. Motives | Enable customers to connect to your brand - one thingFacebook can be good forSource: http://www.facebook.com/zapposZappos – a show case for customer experience - offers their fans a place to expressthemselves and show their affection. This is very powerful but depends oncustomer’s willingness or urge to share their sentiments. A deserted Facebook pagecan be very daunting.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 21
  • 22. Motives | Co-Creation, Crowd-Sourcing, Social Innovation or: Letyour Customers fuel R&D In almost three years, IdeaStorm has crossed the 10,000 idea mark and implemented nearly 400 ideas! Source: http://www.ideastorm.com/ideaAboutSource: http://www.ideastorm.comDell managed to build a community that constantly delivers and rates ideas. Dellcan harness that creative power and focus on the most promising ideas as stated bythe wisdom of the crowds.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 22
  • 23. Motives | Another prominent example for idea gathering Source: http://mystarbucksidea.force.com/apex/ideahomeStarbucks also manages to engage with their fans and motivates them to providethe company with an impressive amount of ideas.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 23
  • 24. Motives | Helping customers can be very rewarding - not just inan altruistic sense Watch on YouTube how Twelpforce works: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=RbkS8AnqNGU Best Buy used Twelpforce in a viral campaign on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=6gN41STo4TM&feature=relatedSource: http://twitter.com/#!/twelpforceThe intention: Demonstrate the competence of the company by harnessing thecollective know-how and enabling ALL staff to give answers to questions onTwitter directly.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 24
  • 25. Motives | Deutsche Telekom gives customer service on Twitterand Facebook a faceSource: http://www.telekom-hilft.de/In contrast to Best Buy Deutsche Telekom chose a central support team helpingcustomers on Twitter and Facebook. The upside here as well: other users can seehow well and fast the team solves the problem – or not. A natural incentive to do agood job.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 25
  • 26. So many opportunities for companies engaging in Social Media –What are you waiting for? Let‘s move into Social Media. Big time.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 26
  • 27. ContentsWhy Social Media - Motives for engagementWarning | Provocative thoughts – Rules of engagementThe Social Media CommunityThe Social Media Endeavour – Some things to considerDiscussionStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 27
  • 28. Rules of Engagement | You have to play by the rules of thecommunity Rules of Engagement* 1.  It‘s all about them 2.  Community is a gift 3.  Be humble. Always 4.  Listen. Acknowledge 5.  It’s not about the where 6.  Equip instead of sell 7.  Celebrate them *As taught by Chris Brogan, social media guru Source: http://mcdn.hubspot.com/imu/3_IntroToSocialMedia_GF201.pdfIn order to use the full potential of becoming active in social media you have tounderstand how the community works and what your role can be. Also, you don’tmake the rules, but you have to follow them.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 28
  • 29. Rules of Engagement | It’s all about them«Community is never about you, your product, or anything elserelated to YOUR goals……except insofar as you serve to power theirs.»The community is sensitive to self promotion and dishonesty. They don’t want to bemarketed to. The best way to make it into their minds and hearts is being helpful.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 29
  • 30. Rules of Engagement | Community is a gift«If people form a community around your stuff, be pleased.Whether or not it’s on your site, under your control, you havesomething to work with.»The question is, how can you stimulate people to form a community around you?Why would people donate their time to care about you?Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 30
  • 31. Rules of Engagement | Be humble. Always«The moment you forget that you’re there as a participant andthink you’re the owner, you’re on a fast ride down to nothing.»There are many examples where companies disregarded this rule. It never turnedout well for them. Being a trusted, reliable and authentic member of the communityis a great asset.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 31
  • 32. Rules of Engagement | Listen. Acknowledge«Listening is point 1. If you don’t listen, you fail. Butacknowledging people’s participation is the most most mostmost… most important part of the community. Fail this and fail.»This is very challenging, since you need to be on your post all the time and reactfast. Conversation is real time. There is no 48h response time.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 32
  • 33. Rules of Engagement | It’s not about the where«A community isn’t a Facebook community or a Twittercommunity or any social network in general. It’s people whogather. Tribes are always nomadic in the new web.»Don’t think about social media in terms of channels or technology. Understand themechanics and dynamic of your community.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 33
  • 34. Rules of Engagement | Equip instead of sell«Your community wants to succeed. They look to you (if you’relucky) as part of that recipe. Give them more and moresuccess, not more and more of the product you need to sell.»This requires a good understanding of the community. The better you understandtheir needs, motives and expectations the better you can support them.The principle of reciprocity should provide return.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 34
  • 35. Rules of Engagement | Celebrate them«If all you offer is a place to praise and talk about yourproducts and services, pack it in. Seek out your community’spersonal and professional successes and praise those, too.More so.»People like to be flattered and respond well to praise. Following this advice in allhonesty might be a good investment at marginal cost.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 35
  • 36. ContentsWhy Social Media - Motives for engagementThe Social Media Community – Rules of engagementThe Social Media Endeavour – Some things to considerDiscussionStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 36
  • 37. Social Media Endeavour | Do you know who you want to address?Yes, it’s communications 101, but to be able to answer the following questions, aclear understanding of the audience is mandatory.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 37
  • 38. Social Media Endeavour | Can you reach your target group viasocial media?Seemingly a no-brainer, but you have to be sure about that one. Also it shouldn’t betoo hard to answer with a little bit of research.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 38
  • 39. Social Media Endeavour | Where are your customers? Are there special interest communities? Which platforms do they use? Who do they listen to? Who are the influencers? Who are the authorities? Search for keywords relevant in your industry and identify sources dealing with you or your industry. (Yes, Google is a fine place to start as well as the usual suspects like Twitter or Facebook) Monitor these sources and follow cross references. Identify influencers and authorities. Try to understand how these communities work and how you could fit into that picture.Since we are talking about networks you can start about anywhere. Sooner or lateryou should come across all relevant participants.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 39
  • 40. Social Media Endeavour | You need to start somewhere You don’t need precise goals at the beginning… You can test You can play You can try You can learn …but once you’re getting serious you do need goals Focus on few areas Determine and allocate resources Monitor & measure success CorrectIn order to do the right things and to do them right, you need to know where to putthe right amount of resources. This is what you need goals for.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 40
  • 41. Social Media Endeavour | Are your your goals SMART? Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant Time BoundIn order to be able manage the use of resources adequately, your goals need to beSMART.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 41
  • 42. Social Media Endeavour | Does what you want relate to what youraudience wants? Does your target group want to interact with you? Do they allow you to play the role you intend to play? What motivates them in the long run to interact with you? Can you address their needs, expectations, values, motives? Will you provide added value? For them. Not just for you.To answer these questions a deep understanding of your target group ismandatory. Aligning your intentions with the reality of your target audience iscrucial. Ignorance of this fact is often a reason for failure.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 42
  • 43. Social Media Endeavour | Are you ready to lose control? You won’t always control the message. You may hear things you rather would not. You may need to answer questions you rather would not. It might not even be your choice. If the community wants to talk about you, they will. Maybe you just have to bear it. Fighting them, might make it worse. But: It could also be a chance. If you are deeply connected with the community, they will listen.Today you can’t prevent people from talking about you. You can take part in theconversation and try to actively shape it.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 43
  • 44. Social Media Endeavour | Will your engagement be authentic? Does your brand support or hinder your efforts? Does your culture actually embrace dialogue, transparency and openness?«If you’re trying to fake it, your not gonna make it». People are smart. They findout if you’re trying to play them. And that is usually not taken very well.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 44
  • 45. Social Media Endeavour | Can you really support your socialmedia engagement? Do you have the infrastructure? Do you have enough resources? Do you they have the right skills?There is the notion that social media is cheap, even for free. Especially the later isuntrue. Really engaging in social media takes time and skills.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 45
  • 46. Social Media Endeavour | Who in the company should engage insocial media? Anyone who wants? Who can control them? How can you ensure quality? Anyone who is ordered to? Will they be good ambassadors of your company? Few centralized people? Easier to train and control. Many decentralized people? More voices make more sound, distribute workload. It depends on… …goals …culture …skillsAgain there is no single correct solution. Whoever represent your company needsto know what they are doing: be clear about the goals, tasks, competencies,responsibilities and rules of their engagement. The communication department isbest suited to advice the corporation in this matter and should be consulted.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 46
  • 47. Social Media Engagement | Do the views on social media match? What they care about Match? Your objectives Community rules Match? Corporate culture Expectations Match? Capabilities and resourcesMost failures in social media engagement can be explained by a mismatch of eitherone of these dimensions. Therefore checking them in advance might save somepainful experiences.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 47
  • 48. ContentsWhy Social Media - Motives for engagementThe Social Media Community – Rules of engagementThe Social Media Endeavour – Some things to considerDiscussionStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 48
  • 49. AppendixStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 49
  • 50. Social Media Endeavour | Some things to consider §  Do you know who you want to address? §  Can you reach your target group via social media? §  Where are your customers? §  Are you clear about your goals? Are they SMART? §  Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Time-Bound §  Does what you want relate to what your audience wants? §  Does your target group want to interact with you? §  Do they allow you to play the role you intend to play? §  What motivates them in the long run to interact with you? §  Can you address their needs, expectations, values, motives? §  Will you provide added value? For them. Not just for you. §  Are you ready to lose control? §  Can you bear the heat from the community? §  Can refrain from trying to fight them? §  Will your engagement be authentic? §  Des your brand support or hinder your efforts? §  Does your culture actually embrace dialogue, transparency and openness? §  Can you really support your social media engagement? §  Do you have the infrastructure? §  Do you have enough resources? §  Do you they have the right skills?Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 50
  • 51. Top 10 Guidelines for Social Media Participation at COMPANYThese guidelines apply to (COMPANY) employees or contractors While all (COMPANY) employees are welcome to participate inwho create or contribute to blogs, wikis, social networks, virtual Social Media, we expect everyone who participates in onlineworlds, or any other kind of Social Media. Whether you log into commentary to understand and to follow these simple butTwitter, Yelp, Wikipedia, MySpace or Facebook pages, or comment important guidelines. These rules might sound strict and contain aon online media stories — these guidelines are for you. bit of legal-sounding jargon but please keep in mind that our overall goal is simple: to participate online in a respectful, relevant way that protects our reputation and of course follows the letter and spirit of the law.1. Be transparent and state that you work at (COMPANY). Your honesty 6. When disagreeing with others opinions, keep it appropriate andwill be noted in the Social Media environment. If you are writing about polite. If you find yourself in a situation online that looks as if it’s(COMPANY) or a competitor, use your real name, identify that you work becoming antagonistic, do not get overly defensive and do notfor (COMPANY), and be clear about your role. If you have disengage from the conversation abruptly: feel free to ask the PRa vested interest in what you are discussing, be the first to say so. Director for advice and/or to disengage from the dialogue in a polite manner that reflects well on (COMPANY).2. Never represent yourself or (COMPANY) in a false or misleadingway. All statements must be true and not misleading; all claims must be 7. If you want to write about the competition, make sure you behavesubstantiated. diplomatically, have the facts straight and that you have the appropriate permissions.3. Post meaningful, respectful comments — in other words, please, nospam and no remarks that are off-topic or offensive. 8. Please never comment on anything related to legal matters, litigation, or any parties (COMPANY) may be in litigation with.4. Use common sense and common courtesy: for example, it’s best toask permission to publish or report on conversations that are meant to 9. Never participate in Social Media when the topic being discussedbe private or internal to (COMPANY). Make sure your efforts to be may be considered a crisis situation. Even anonymous comments maytransparent dont violate (COMPANY)s privacy, confidentiality, and legal be traced back to your or (COMPANY)’s IP address. Refer all Socialguidelines for external commercial speech. Media activity around crisis topics to PR and/or Legal Affairs Director.5. Stick to your area of expertise and do feel free to provide unique, 10. Be smart about protecting yourself, your privacy, and (COMPANY)’sindividual perspectives on non-confidential activities at (COMPANY). confidential information. What you publish is widely accessible and will be around for a long time, so consider the content carefully. Google has a long memory. NOTE: Mainstream media inquiries must be referred to the Director of Public Relations.Source: http://www.shiftcomm.com/downloads/socialmediaguidelines.pdfStimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 51
  • 52. Crisis Management tips 1. Set-up a Crisis Management Team – if you haven’t done so already. 2. Ensure the team has sufficient training and hands-on experience communicating with customers on social media channels 3. Set up response channels – if you haven’t done so already – such as a blog, YouTube account, Twitter account, etc 4. Star listening: Set up alerts and RSS feeds. Subscribe to Radian6 or Google Alerts. 5. Make it someone’s job to listen everyday. You never know when a crisis will hit. 6. Imagine the worst PR scenarios possible to hit your business. Prepare for them by making sure you understand and can use the social channels like YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, etc, you’ve set up. 7. Optimize a website or blog you intend to use for crisis management with keywords that can be used by the opposition. 8. Nurture meaningful connections with major players on the Net who have strong followings on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, etc, so that they may help you in times of crisis. 9. Run regular fire drills – at least once a quarter because the Net and tools change so quickly. You need to know you’re team is prepared. 10. Keep listening 11. Be ready to respond immediately – or at least within 24 hours Source: http://jontusmedia.com/crisis-management-social-media/Further reading:http://www.slideshare.net/elishatan/social-media-crisis-management-three-case-studieshttp://www.slideshare.net/corinnew/social-media-as-a-crisis-communication-tool-during-the-icelandic-volcano-eruption Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 52
  • 53. Opportunities | Social media can help you getting the message out§  Increased reach, address new target groups§  Word of mouth•  Better understand your stakeholders•  Get more direct feedback•  Improve your offering together with stakeholders•  Improve bonding with stakeholders and thus increase loyalty•  Counter fragmented media consumption•  Circumvent intermediaries and save time and cost•  Easy control and monitoring of successThis list is not exhaustive but gives an impression of how a company can benefitfrom the use of social media. It is also a basis for further discussion.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 53
  • 54. Challenges| Social media is not just another communicationchannel§  New communication rules need to be learnt and followed§  Control over information – bad news also spread fast§  Well informed, challenging stakeholders expect adequate responses§  Engagement has to be serious§  Communication processes are much faster§  Fragmented target audience is difficult to reach all at once§  Unwanted messages can lead to loss of authenticity and trust§  Target audience might not yet fully trust social media channelsThis list is not exhaustive but gives an impression of the challenges a companyfaces when engaging with social media. It is also a basis for further discussion.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 54
  • 55. Recommendations | Social media should neither be ignored norrushed into§  Start listening §  Get a feeling for different social media tools §  See how the community uses them §  See what they say about you§  Monitor §  Systematically monitor relevant channels §  Identify information hubs and opinion leaders §  Start feeding your messages to these channels§  Engage §  Share your content: news, press releases, videos, photos, etc. §  Invite stakeholders to interact with you on social media platforms §  Engage in the conversation with other participants §  With long term focus: Actively shape your position and reputation by your messages and value adding interactionsAlthough first steps can be taken easily with little risk, serious engagement shouldfollow a long term strategy and clear goal set.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 55
  • 56. Effective social media engagement doesn‘t happenby chance.Stimmt.Stimmt AG | Corporate Social Media Engagement – Using Social Media for Good 56