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Social Learning Networks and Social Bookmarking

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Presentation at DMU 2008 e-learning symposium to raise awareness of the potential benefits of social bookmarking and Social Networking

Presentation at DMU 2008 e-learning symposium to raise awareness of the potential benefits of social bookmarking and Social Networking

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  • Heather 3 mins Running Total 3 mins to include welcome, introduction and objectives Post it notes: * yellow – “what you will do differently as a result of this session” * Red/pink – “what is stopping me” Tags for blog comments are: workshop3 Advice to participants: make notes on the handouts Handouts: 1) Powerpoint slides 2) Minds on Fire PDF 3) heathers???
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    • 1. Steve Mackenzie and Heather Conboy: May 16 th 2008 SOCIAL (LEARNING) NETWORKS AND SOCIAL BOOKMARKING 1. Workshop Admin, Introductions and Objectives 2. Setting the Scene and Context for this workshop (SM) 3. Social Bookmarking (HC) 4. Social and Learning Networks (SM) 5. Summary and Final Thoughts Workshop Agenda Welcome
    • 2. Introductions DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
      • Heather Conboy (E-learning co-ordinator, Faculty of Humanities)
      • Worked with lecturers on the PgCertHE to raise awareness of Web 2.0 technologies and the benefits of working with the two most well known web 2.0 technologies Blogs and Wikis
      • Steve Mackenzie (Distance Learning Developer, Faculty of HLS)
      • Has developed and delivered a ‘Web 2.0: the basics: An introduction to learning and teaching’ online course which gives teachers practical experience of Social Bookmarking, Social Networking and other Web 2.0 technology.
      • Currently Studying for MA Independent Study: The impact of interactive and collaborative technology
    • 3. Workshop Objectives The application of Web 2.0 technologies for educational purposes is gaining ground in many academic quarters. In this workshop we will highlight the features of two popular web 2.0 technologies Social Bookmarking and Social Networking and explore ideas of how they can be used for teaching, learning and professional development. In this workshop we will 1. Explore the meaning of social bookmarking/ Social Networking as part of the Web2.0 environment 2. Demonstrate the use of social bookmarking and networking (including del.icio.us, Ning) 3. Ask participants to share their thoughts and ideas for using these tools 4. Share how we have tried to use these tools as part of the pathfinder 5. Explore ways in which they can be useful for both students and staff DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 4. Your Experience
      • Social Bookmarking
        • None
        • A little
        • A fair bit
        • Quite a lot
      • Social Networking
        • None
        • A little
        • A fair bit
        • Quite a lot
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 5. Before We Start: Some Simple Definitions
      • Social Bookmarking is a web-based service to share Internet bookmarks. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social bookmarking
      • Social Networking is a phenomena defined by linking people to each other in some way. www.topicguru.net/
      • Networked Learning is a process of developing and maintaining connections with people and information, and communicating in such a way so as to support one another's learning. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Networked learning
      • Web 2.0 is a term describing the trend in the use of World Wide Web technology and web design that aims to enhance creativity, information sharing, and, most notably, collaboration among users. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 6. Web 2.0 (Social Software) and the Power of Network Learning
      • Web 2.0 allows you to participate (conversations, contributions) and share (ideas and resources)
      • Web 2.0 connects people and resources
      • Web 2.0 technology is easy to use
      If you believe that interacting and communicating with others i.e. being social is conducive to learning then Web 2.0 is useful: DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 7. Web 2.0: Facilitator of Social (Networked) Learning
      • It could be argued that students can do this anyway. Web 2.0 technologies can build on and extend face to face interactions . They can facilitate for example:
      • Ease of access (e.g 24/7 internet access, electronic written tutor feedback always available)
      • More immediate or quicker Feedback
      • A voice for quieter, less dominant students
      • Connection to a wider audience permanently
      • Capture ideas for further reflection, discussion and debate
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008 Students can learn by:
    • 8. The Impact of Social Software on Learning http://youtube.com/watch?v=grI_h88vs3g George Siemens: proponent of a new learning theory Connectivism DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 9. Social software (Web 2.0) can facilitate networked learning Blogs Micro-Blogging Media Wikis Social Bookmarking Social Networking Any Questions
      • Make a note of any questions you may have from what you have seen in the video clip, about web 2.0 and/or Social software
      • If not enough time to ask your
      • question then post a message in
      • the web2learning network and
      • myself, heather and others can
      • respond.
      • http://web2learning.ning.com
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 10. Social Bookmarking
      • The real-time Web, organized by you.“ (Technorati.com)
      • A way of storing, classifying, sharing and searching links through the practice of folksonomy techniques on the internet. In a social bookmarking system (eg del.icio.us ), users store lists of internet resources that they find useful, and other people with similar interests can view the links by category, tags, or randomly. (Futurelab)
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 11. Tagging & Citeulike, Connotea, Source: www.modulussystems.com/blog/2007/09/anyone-fo... DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 12. Nuts ‘n bolts: how-to
      • Allows you to save Web pages as bookmarks and access them online
      • Allows you to ‘ tag ’ (categorise) as you please
      • Enables you to share your bookmarks with other users and to search other people’s bookmarks
      • Enables you to form networks with other users (people who are searching for relevant sites for you)
      • Allows both Personalising & Sharing : Reading your network’s bookmarks, e.g. Del.icio.us provides convenient RSS feeds.
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 13. http://del.icio.us/dmupathfinder/socialnetworking The Del.icio.us website (Interface) DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 14. Ideas for social bookmarking Projects Informal and independent learning Scaleable build resource for class or subject Researcher networks Staff resources Possible integration with other networking DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 15. Social Networks: Commonly Known Sites
      • Facebook, Myspace, Bebo
      • Primary purpose is social
      • Educational uses have/ are being explored
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
      • Personally I have no interest in Facebook as a learning tool, as in my opinion
      • it is a distraction from learning and an
      • invasion of students social space.
      • Note: It may have a role to play for some tutors
      Owen Kelly currently teaches digital interactive media at Arcada, a university of applied sciences in Helsinki, Finland. He advocates the use of facebook (but not myspace and bebo) educationally. You can read his views here: http://www.owenkelly.net/393/social-software-as-a-front-end/
    • 16. Create Your own Learning Network: Ning
      • Very popular way of creating your own learning network
      • Why?
        • A more co-ordinated purposeful approach
        • Easily created
        • Easily organised and administered
        • Easily customisable
        • Inviting, easy to use online environment
        • Private
        • Network organiser can easily broadcast messages
        • Network Activity: email notification for participants
        • Powerful use of RSS (Really Simple Syndication) Feeds
        • Note: A working network can be setup in 15-30 minutes
        • Note: Useful way to embark on informal professional development
        • http://Web2learning.ning.com
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 17. Case Study: Web2learning
      • Features Include:
        • Links from latest activity to people or resources
        • Sharing/uploading of video, audio, pictures
        • Imported RSS Feeds that link to web2learning del.icio.us tags
        • Imported RSS Feed to interesting and highly relevant blogs from George Siemens – elearnspace and ‘Connectivism’
        • Imported RSS Feeds to Slideshare application that delivers world wide PowerPoint presentations – subject matter is ‘Connectivism’
        • Creation of Sub Groups within the network
        • Ability for individuals to make blog posts within the network
        • Forum discussions
        • Imported RSS Feed to interesting and highly relevant blog - TechCrunch
      • Set up as part of research into teaching and learning using web 2.0 tools
      • Professional development approach for teachers. Part of the approach was to use this personalised Learning Network
      • Fits into a teaching model that uses the network to foster informal learning to supplement formal teaching and learning
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 18. What to know more about Social Networks and/or Web 2.0?
      • Professional Development – Ning Networks
      • Join one of these informal learning networks to participate in a learning network and learn about web 2.0 and its application to education
        • College 2.0
        • Classroom 2.0
        • Ning in Education
        • Professional Development 2.0
        • Web 2.0 Learning
      • Professional Development – The student experience
      • Sign up for the Web 2.0 the basics: An introduction Course
        • Distance learning online course over 6 weeks
        • Based on the SCORE 2.0 Model of learning
        • Groups of 12 max either DMU Staff or invited Global Educators
        • Contact Steve Mackenzie if interested for a September/October start (dates to be finalised)
      • Reading and Del.icio.us Bookmark tags
        • http://www.johnseelybrown.com/mindsonfire.pdf Excerpt: “The most profound impact of the Internet is its ability to support and expand the various aspects of social learning.”
        • http://del.icio.us/dmupathfinder/socialnetworking
        • http://del.icio.us/tag/socialnetworking
        • http://del.icio.us/Web2Learning/socialnetworking
      Example Social Networks with a learning focus http://www.realmentalhealth.com/ http://dailystrength.org/ DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 19. Issues to Consider for Non-institutional use of web 2.0 Technology
      • Web 2.0 and the use of Social (learning) networks has some fantastic attributes to facilitate learning.
      • However Institutions do need to be aware of important issues such as
        • Personal safety of staff and students when engaging in activities on the Internet
        • Privacy – it might be necessary and appropriate to ensure that students contribute in a secure private environment
        • Security of data and ability to deliver a service
        • Legal issues – e.g. plagiarism, copyright and libel
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 20. Additional Case Study: Why we use Ning? Edge Hill University: Their Story as explained at http://ltd-edgehill.blogspot.com/2007/11/using-social-network-instead-of-vle.html There are many different social networking sites, and they are all different. This means the interaction of people in each of them is different. We’ve chosen the Ning social networking site to test at Edge Hill because:
      • We wanted people to be able to join the private group without accepting the module leader as a friend . This seemed to be the case with Facebook (let us know if there are any settings to change this). We thought that students might not want to accept their tutors as a Facebook Friend as this gives them access to your updates about what you are doing and photos. Using Ning feels a lot less intrusive into students private lives .
      • The groups can be set so that the module leader (or whoever set the group up) accepts requests for membership of the group. This means that they can keep control of access , but students can still take the responsibility to join themselves.
      • Once students are members they can use the Video tool to share videos, the Music tool to share audio, the Photos tool to share images, the Forum to share ideas and attach documents. The module leader can send out notices via the Blog tool. This covers everything that they might want to share.
      • Note: Also not mentioned is a new feature about to be introduced within a ning network- wikis
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 21. Additional Case Study (con) : Social Network or VLE?
      • Our first decision was whether to focus the students on using the VLE or a Social Network area. The main differences are:
        • In our VLE (WebCT/Blackboard CE) there are limited options for students to add content easily. Many Social Network Services make this simple, and empower the students to share, create and communicate more.
        • Students have to be invited to the area, and then set up their own accounts. This is an added level of complexity for them over having an institutional account to log into everything, but none of the students who started using the area today had a problem and it only took them half a minute.
        • You can subscribe to RSS feeds detailing activity on the site. Although not everyone uses feeds, if you follow a lot of sites there's no good reason not to! If the VLE that we use had RSS feeds of updates, it would make it much easier to follow what is going on in each area.
        • http://ltd-edgehill.blogspot.com/2007/11/using-social-network-instead-of-vle.html
      DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 22. The floor is yours – Ideas and Questions DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008
    • 23. Final Thoughts On Networking “ As this article states , the ability to form networks is vital for achieving personal and career goals. When I suggest how important personal learning networks are, I often encounter the statement "I don't have time". As this author states: "If you want to succeed you need to make the time". She then goes on to suggest that we need to schedule time for forming networks so that it becomes habitual. I wonder how many educators regularly set aside time to consider the quality and diversity of their networks.” (George Siemens – elearnspace e-mail newsletter 11/05/2008) Anticipate problems and don’t be afraid to seek constructive help. No matter how carefully you plan, some things will invariably go wrong.  Don’t despair: numerous educators have emphasized the value of risk-taking to professional growth.  The point is not to give up (“Oh, I tried online group work and it didn’t work at all”).  Seek help from knowledgeable colleagues and from faculty development centers where you will find books, articles, and professionals who can offer indirect advice or who can observe your online classes.   Remember that the research on deep learning is unequivocal.  To reach your intended educational outcomes, you must provide students with opportunities for  interactions and for active learning.  These should occur in carefully structured, sequenced activities that are frequently assessed. The technology is merely a tool to help implement these techniques. Barbara Millis Managing—and Motivating!—Distance Learning Group Activities Thank You for attending. Please fill in and hand back your post it notes DMU 2008 Symposium : Social (learning) networks and social bookmarking – Steve Mackenzie & Heather Conboy May 16th 2008

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