MUNCH POKE PING  E-Safety and Vulnerable YP  PRUs Conference  July 8 th  2011  MUNCH PING POKE!
Introductions  Stephen Carrick-Davies <ul><li>Ten years at Childnet International  </li></ul><ul><li>Now an Independent Tr...
AGENDA FOR WORKSHOP Discussion/reflections/questions  Discussion/reflections/questions Discussion/reflections/questions Di...
Guardian Newspaper article 19 June 2010
“ If you took away my mobile phone you  would take away a part of me” THE ONLINE WORLD  IS  THE CHILD’S WORLD !  The impor...
ALL FOR FREE …… BUT ….WHAT PRICE IS FREE ?  Social location   APPLICATIONS Huge range of apps NEWS FEEDS  “boast by post” ...
<ul><li>Classifying the risks to children online  </li></ul>Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project and referenced in t...
<ul><li>Contact  </li></ul><ul><li>www.ceop.gov.uk   </li></ul><ul><li>if you have concerns about inappropriate communicat...
<ul><li>Classifying the risks to children online  </li></ul>Violent and hateful content  Classification by ‘EU Kids’ onlin...
<ul><li>2)  OVERVIEW OF PROJECT </li></ul>What additional risks do vulnerable YP encounter, and bring to social media?  Wh...
The word  ‘ Vulnerable’ <ul><li>Vulnerability is not static - All children can be vulnerable at different stages and degre...
<ul><li>Those outside of school in Pupil Referral Units or NEET settings  </li></ul>We have identified a group who do shar...
Methodology  <ul><li>A Grounded Theory approach with data taken from: </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews of relevant literature and...
Film
Film  <ul><li>FEEDBACK </li></ul><ul><li>Showcasing how tools can put the learner in the centre and become co-researchers ...
Feedback  <ul><li>Do you recognise these reflections from the YP ?  </li></ul>
Eight main findings under 4 main themes of  3)  KEY FINDINGS + RECOMMENDATIONS
<ul><li>The task of assessing the correlation between offline vulnerabilities and online risk for certain groups of young ...
Lack of supportive adults in their lives  More unsupervised time, fewer structures and boundaries  Fluid learning environm...
<ul><li>Dedicated staff working with vulnerable young in PRUs (and elsewhere) must be given ongoing support and training t...
<ul><ul><li>For most young people, the primary gateway to the internet is now their mobile phone.  Furthermore because of ...
<ul><ul><li>This report reviews whether technology, as well as being an amplifier, can somehow also act as an ‘incubator’....
<ul><li>It is imperative to be informed by young people’s own experience of online risk.  To understand whether and exactl...
<ul><li>E-safety needs to be embedded into the wider teaching of emotional, social and digital literacies in all schools f...
<ul><li>It is becoming apparent that there are very real, risky situations online which vulnerable young people in particu...
<ul><li>More research about the targeting of young girls by older boys via technology should be undertaken and a multi-age...
<ul><li>Empowering vulnerable young people to overcome the challenges and risks they face online takes enormous expertise,...
<ul><li>If the support and guidance which PRUs give students in this area is to be effective, it has to be consistent acro...
<ul><li>It is crucial to balance the risks and showcase the very real positive ways technology can be used to support vuln...
<ul><li>It is important to pilot more creative approaches to the use of mobile technology and access to social networking ...
<ul><li>Many PRUs have a mixture of paid teachers and external agencies working with pupils in centres and in the communit...
<ul><li>A number of staff interviewed said they needed better advice about when certain online activity was illegal and wh...
<ul><li>Vulnerable young people may have a lack of understanding of the consequences of risky behaviour online, and be una...
<ul><li>It’s important that those offering ‘Report abuse’ and helpline services appreciate the ‘barriers’ that vulnerable ...
<ul><li>DISCUSSION  </li></ul>
Q1) In what capacity do you work with vulnerable young people ?  <ul><li>Using an online survey tool we had 61 professiona...
Q2) How would you describe your contact with young people ?  39%  direct teaching, support  24 indirect management, leader...
Q3) In your experience are the young people you work with involved in risky behaviour online or via mobile phone ?  <ul><l...
Q4)  Problematic question  This question was too vaguely drafted. It was an attempt to ask staff whether they felt that YP...
Q 5) Thinking about the young people you work with, how confident do you think they are about their ability to avoid or na...
Q6) Thinking about the young people you work with, do you feel that they are more at risk than other young people when it ...
Q 8) Have you ever received training on how young people use social media and how they are/may be at risk can online, for ...
<ul><li>81% (48) said that they had an e-safety strategy (including AUPs) in place. 8 said they weren’t sure and 1 said “n...
Feedback from survey and interviews <ul><li>34% replied saying that they were very equipped to deal with abuse and 12% say...
Q 10) In your work with young people do you feel you are properly equipped to deal with cases of online or mobile phone ab...
Q 11)  In your work with vulnerable young people have you used Social Media or mobile technology positively to engage with...
Q 12) Would you be interested in contributing to the research and the production of resources through either:  <ul><li>40 ...
<ul><li>DISCUSSION  </li></ul>
Our PRU set up its own internal social network to allow interaction between staff and pupils.  Southampton “ We don’t have...
<ul><li>DISCUSSION  </li></ul>
P olicies I nfrastructure E ducation Whole-school ongoing education  & prevention  programme which is targeted at both pup...
Legalities of handling online disclosures. What is our duty of care and legal ramifications of viewing. We need positive e...
Need help to embed this topic into wider Digital and Social and emotional literacy schemes to help develop resilience and ...
“ Deliverables” need to be dynamic and not a set of do’s and don’ts. AUPS need to be positive NOT negative -expectation is...
R isk R eputation R esilience The  3   Rs   of digital literacy
THANK YOU FOR COMING, FOR YOUR TIME AND FOR YOUR INPUT  www.carrick-davies.com [email_address] Tel 07712451859  See  www.c...
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E safety and vulnerable yp -Presentation for PRUS conference July 2011pr us conference presentation july 2011

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Presentation given to delegates at the PRUS.org.uk network conference at Standstead Airport in July 2011. The presentation profiled the work that Stephen Carrick-Davies has been undertaking for the TDA looking at the social media and vulnerable young people. In particular what staff working with these YP need in temrs of training and support.

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  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • E safety and vulnerable yp -Presentation for PRUS conference July 2011pr us conference presentation july 2011

    1. 1. MUNCH POKE PING E-Safety and Vulnerable YP PRUs Conference July 8 th 2011 MUNCH PING POKE!
    2. 2. Introductions Stephen Carrick-Davies <ul><li>Ten years at Childnet International </li></ul><ul><li>Now an Independent Trainer/Consultant </li></ul>
    3. 3. AGENDA FOR WORKSHOP Discussion/reflections/questions Discussion/reflections/questions Discussion/reflections/questions Discussion/reflections/questions 2) OVERVIEW OF PROJECT 3) KEY FINDINGS + RECOMMENDATIONS 4) Staff Training needs 5) Next steps 1) WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT
    4. 4. Guardian Newspaper article 19 June 2010
    5. 5. “ If you took away my mobile phone you would take away a part of me” THE ONLINE WORLD IS THE CHILD’S WORLD ! The importance of technology for “digital natives” AMPLIFIER (gives children a voice) ANONYMITY ALWAYS ON AWAY FROM SUPERVISION ACCEPTANCE - IDENTITY & STATUS ACCESS THE WORLD ACTIVE NOT PASSIVE MEDIUM ADDICTIVE
    6. 6. ALL FOR FREE …… BUT ….WHAT PRICE IS FREE ? Social location APPLICATIONS Huge range of apps NEWS FEEDS “boast by post” MESSAGES Superseding E-mail Video coming WHO’S ONLINE Know who is online now! PHOTOS/TAGS Comment and Tag photos face recognition LIVE CHAT Superseding IM FRIENDS Find, link, be in constant contact + on your mobile VIDEO link and embed
    7. 7. <ul><li>Classifying the risks to children online </li></ul>Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project and referenced in the Byron Report CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Adverts Spam Sponsorship Personal info Violent and hateful content Pornographic unwelcome sexual content Bias Racist Misleading info or advice Tracking Harvesting Personal info Being bullied harassed or stalked Meeting strangers Being groomed Self harm Unwelcome persuasions Illegal downloading Hacking Gambling Financial scams Terrorism Bullying or harassing another Creating and uploading inappropriate material Providing misleading info/advice Child as Recipient Child as Participant Child as Actor
    8. 8. <ul><li>Contact </li></ul><ul><li>www.ceop.gov.uk </li></ul><ul><li>if you have concerns about inappropriate communication from an adult to a minor . </li></ul>Pornographic unwelcome sexual content Meeting strangers Being groomed Creating and uploading inappropriate material Online grooming is a criminal offence Include this button on your home page “ One-third of those who sexually abuse children are just children themselves.” BBC Newsnight programme March 2010 21,630 BEBO members have the name “Porn Star” “ Sexting” = teens sharing nude photos via mobiles and web. The practice can have serious legal and psychological consequences CONTENT Child as Recipient CONTACT Child as Participant CONDUCT Child as Actor Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values
    9. 9. <ul><li>Classifying the risks to children online </li></ul>Violent and hateful content Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project and referenced in the Byron Report 22% of yp aged 11-18 report having been cyber bullied. It ruins lives. YP may not disclose that it is happening CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Being bullied harassed or stalked Bullying or harassing another Child as Recipient Child as Participant Child as Actor
    10. 10. <ul><li>2) OVERVIEW OF PROJECT </li></ul>What additional risks do vulnerable YP encounter, and bring to social media? What can we learn from those who are working in this area ? What training and support do professionals need re social media risk in their practice ? What do staff need ? What are the risks?
    11. 11. The word ‘ Vulnerable’ <ul><li>Vulnerability is not static - All children can be vulnerable at different stages and degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>All children are different so there are dangers in making broad statements. </li></ul><ul><li>Many children are neglected which is harder to spot yet makes them vulnerable. </li></ul><ul><li>Vulnerable yp cross particular stages of development and can become vulnerable adults </li></ul><ul><li>The 4 categorisations of risk offline do not necessarily mirror online experience (eg a </li></ul><ul><li>disabled YP may be empowered online due to the ‘leveller’ nature of the internet. </li></ul><ul><li>The paradox that over-protected children can be more vulnerable online. </li></ul><ul><li>There is an argument that the more a child uses the internet the more they become confident and possibly complacent and feel ‘invinsible’ and don’t feel they are at risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Those who have experienced offline risk and abuse may be more resilient and able to protect themselves online or may not be affected so much by the risks they encounter. </li></ul><ul><li>There is need for more research into how children and YP who are risk offline are at risk </li></ul><ul><li>online. (UKCCIS is looking at this along with others). </li></ul>However in the meantime.... This is complex because:
    12. 12. <ul><li>Those outside of school in Pupil Referral Units or NEET settings </li></ul>We have identified a group who do share many common vulnerabilities Looked after children “ Chaotic” family/home environments Special Education Needs Disabilities and or emotional behavioural difficulties Marginalised groups in our society System neglect, language, migrant communities etc How are these YP susceptible to risk, abuse, attack, exposure, harm online ? Recognising of course that there are other vulnerable groups and overlapping issues
    13. 13. Methodology <ul><li>A Grounded Theory approach with data taken from: </li></ul><ul><li>Reviews of relevant literature and recent studies </li></ul><ul><li>Focus group interviews with YP (using drama and film to build a rapport and engage the group) </li></ul><ul><li>Feedback from professional’s surveys, interviews, site visits & workshops </li></ul><ul><li>Researcher's field notes, diaries and reflections </li></ul>
    14. 14. Film
    15. 15. Film <ul><li>FEEDBACK </li></ul><ul><li>Showcasing how tools can put the learner in the centre and become co-researchers and participants in the delivery of learning. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Feedback <ul><li>Do you recognise these reflections from the YP ? </li></ul>
    17. 17. Eight main findings under 4 main themes of 3) KEY FINDINGS + RECOMMENDATIONS
    18. 18. <ul><li>The task of assessing the correlation between offline vulnerabilities and online risk for certain groups of young people is problematic but nevertheless broad principles can be extrapolated. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Many of the young people I work with are massive risk takers, impulsive to the extreme and often use alcohol and/or drugs. On average they first engage in sexual activity at a far younger age than other students. They also have huge amounts of unsupervised time on their hands, often till very late at night. I teach many YP who are half-asleep as they have been online till gone 3am.” PRU staff member </li></ul></ul>1
    19. 19. Lack of supportive adults in their lives More unsupervised time, fewer structures and boundaries Fluid learning environment and gaps in education and induction Low self-confidence. Identity seen to be part of ‘outsiders’ Influences of alcohol, drugs and gang culture. Risk takers and at risk Experience abusive relationships or environments including anger
    20. 20. <ul><li>Dedicated staff working with vulnerable young in PRUs (and elsewhere) must be given ongoing support and training to better understand how young people are harnessing social media and mobile communication and why it is now the single most important activity many vulnerable young people rely on to give them identity, connection and a sense of community . </li></ul><ul><li>Signposting staff to the existing high-quality, age-appropriate E-safety resources and guidance is important. But there is no substitute for high quality ‘hands-on’ training so staff can fully understand the language, tools and applications </li></ul>Recommendations “ I don’t use social networking so probably understand less than my students.” PRU staff member.
    21. 21. <ul><ul><li>For most young people, the primary gateway to the internet is now their mobile phone. Furthermore because of the way in which young people are able to ‘screen grab’ messages and use private message services such as Blackberry Messenger (BBM) to communicate one-to-many, there is much less distinction between what is private and what is public which creates very real safeguarding issues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I have over 120 people on my BBM but I deleted like 30 on Saturday cause I was angry and they pissed me off so I just deleted them. Since I’ve had my BlackBerry only 2 people have deleted me.” </li></ul></ul>2
    22. 22. <ul><ul><li>This report reviews whether technology, as well as being an amplifier, can somehow also act as an ‘incubator’. Does the constant stream of communication which is created, uploaded, stored, mutated or morphed and then re-broadcast somehow create a new dimension? For example, content originally intended as private can be captured, allowed to gestate, commented upon, added to and altered. It can then re-surface later as a broadcast as something very different. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Staff need to understand the new subtle safeguarding issues of converged services. For example, smart phones now give users access to GPS services which will pin-point users’ locations and face recognition options. </li></ul></ul>Recommendations
    23. 23. <ul><li>It is imperative to be informed by young people’s own experience of online risk. To understand whether and exactly how young people are at risk online, it is imperative to understand young people’s experience of risk through their own narrative accounts and to analyse the contextualised social phenomena found there. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ I go to bed like at 2 o’clock in the morning cause I’m texting. When my pinger’s gone to sleep that’s when I go to sleep. If there’s no-one to ping I’ll go to sleep. If <name> is up till 6am I would stay up all night.” S tudent from Focus Group </li></ul></ul>3
    24. 24. <ul><li>E-safety needs to be embedded into the wider teaching of emotional, social and digital literacies in all schools from an early age . </li></ul>“ Schools should be more serious about this subject, like they don’t know what’s really going on like, ah it’s just a mobile phone and they’re just pinging each other but it’s more serious than that and there ought to be a law about what phone you should have.” Student from focus group Recommendations A resource looking specifically at the compulsive nature of mobiles and understanding the ‘need’ for constantly checking for messages, could be a really positive resource for PRUS and could be a great ‘way in’ to addressing issues of identity and belonging.
    25. 25. <ul><li>It is becoming apparent that there are very real, risky situations online which vulnerable young people in particular can get drawn into. </li></ul><ul><li>Ofline mobbing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The police see a continuing trend where too many young people are robbed because of their mobile phones. Also the inappropriate use of social networking sites can sometimes create an increased risk around youth violence and bullying. Any initiative that helps to reassure and to address some of these concerns whilst allowing young people to be educated to use these internet sites safely has to be welcomed.” Police Sergeant Safer Schools interviewed. </li></ul></ul>4
    26. 26. <ul><li>More research about the targeting of young girls by older boys via technology should be undertaken and a multi-agency-supported campaign about peer-grooming aimed at vulnerable young people should be considered. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ More and more ‘Facebook’ style bullying issues and confrontations are arriving in the classroom with no warnings accessed through mobiles (not PCs). All our young people, despite their socio-economic group, have mobile phones - most with internet access. We have seen serious incidences of grooming through mobile, using a mixture of SN and conversations.” </li></ul></ul>Recommendations
    27. 27. <ul><li>Empowering vulnerable young people to overcome the challenges and risks they face online takes enormous expertise, resources and ultimately a whole-community commitment. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In your work do you feel that you are properly equipped to deal with cases of online or mobile abuse?” 34% said they were very equipped, 54% somewhat equipped and 12% said not equipped. </li></ul></ul>5
    28. 28. <ul><li>If the support and guidance which PRUs give students in this area is to be effective, it has to be consistent across multi-agencies. Any agreed policies should also be understood by those working with vulnerable young people outside the PRU system, including those responsible for caring for young people (parents and carers, or foster providers, care homes etc). This is challenging as some of the environments in which these young people live can be ‘chaotic’. </li></ul>“ We don’t need more guidance from the top down. What we need is support, resources and trust to develop appropriate responses based on our considerable professional experience and understanding of vulnerable young people.” LA advisor. Recommendations
    29. 29. <ul><li>It is crucial to balance the risks and showcase the very real positive ways technology can be used to support vulnerable young people. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In your work do you feel that you are properly equipped to deal with cases of online or mobile abuse?” 34% said they were very equipped, 54% somewhat equipped and 12% said not equipped. </li></ul></ul>6
    30. 30. <ul><li>It is important to pilot more creative approaches to the use of mobile technology and access to social networking within PRUs. Examples of vulnerable young people’s positive engagement with social media should be better promoted and disseminated within the field. The www.prus.org.uk network could help in disseminating good examples to members and help link practitioners wanting to piloting new ideas. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Those who are shy are much more likely to use social media more than face to face as it helps break down communication barriers, especially for those with learning difficulties. Also online games and tools for learning are a great way for children to learn and can be used at optimum times to suit different learning styles.” Teacher </li></ul></ul>Recommendations
    31. 31. <ul><li>Many PRUs have a mixture of paid teachers and external agencies working with pupils in centres and in the community (including training providers), so it is vital to create a standardised approach to E-safety. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In a youth policy environment which continues to prioritise multi-agency working and, (where local areas are making varied decisions about the structure of provision and the different professionals, volunteers and sectors involved in provision), finding shared frameworks to promote effective use of technology and to provide strong direction and support for E-safety work is vital.” </li></ul></ul>7
    32. 32. <ul><li>A number of staff interviewed said they needed better advice about when certain online activity was illegal and what their legal duties were when it came to viewing content on a student’s device. A simple ‘pocket guide’ (or app) for practitioners outlining when content, contact or conduct was criminal would be useful. </li></ul><ul><li>A national conference bringing a range of practitioners from different sectors working with vulnerable young people (including SEN, migrant communities, etc) should be convened to provide an important forum for identifying work being carried out, sharing experience, mapping risk and developing standardised policies. </li></ul>There are various organisations providing specialist support to youth workers in how to use and engage with vulnerable young people using social media. Developing a database of these providers and auditing various policies which provide protection for staff in using social media would be a good. Providing high-quality training for staff on how to protect their own online privacy, reputation and safety is essential if staff are to be more active in engaging with students and helping students with their own profiles. Recommendations
    33. 33. <ul><li>Vulnerable young people may have a lack of understanding of the consequences of risky behaviour online, and be unable or unwilling to get help. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ In a youth policy environment which continues to prioritise multi-agency working and, (where local areas are making varied decisions about the structure of provision and the different professionals, volunteers and sectors involved in provision), finding shared frameworks to promote effective use of technology and to provide strong direction and support for E-safety work is vital.” </li></ul></ul>8
    34. 34. <ul><li>It’s important that those offering ‘Report abuse’ and helpline services appreciate the ‘barriers’ that vulnerable young who may have in using these services. For example reading and writing difficulties, depression, few supportive adults in their lives etc. Has any work been done to create a specific ‘Get Help’ App for Smart phones which would help YP know how and where to get help or report abuse? </li></ul>“ They lack the self-control/regulation that other YP might have. It is also becomes a means by which they can quickly engage in pay-back and retribution from a ‘safe’ distance.” Teacher from a PRU Recommendations
    35. 35. <ul><li>DISCUSSION </li></ul>
    36. 36. Q1) In what capacity do you work with vulnerable young people ? <ul><li>Using an online survey tool we had 61 professionals complete a series of questions </li></ul><ul><li>The majority of these professionals worked directly in PRUS or NEETS settings (combined 82%) 45 </li></ul>Feedback from survey and interviews
    37. 37. Q2) How would you describe your contact with young people ? 39% direct teaching, support 24 indirect management, leadership etc. 30% both direct and indirect 6.5% other (research or wider interest).
    38. 38. Q3) In your experience are the young people you work with involved in risky behaviour online or via mobile phone ? <ul><li>Clear picture emerged that staff felt that YP in these settings were involved in risky behaviour online. </li></ul><ul><li>81% yes 13.2% not sure and 5.7% said “no”. </li></ul>
    39. 39. Q4) Problematic question This question was too vaguely drafted. It was an attempt to ask staff whether they felt that YP were targets, participants, initiators or all of the above.
    40. 40. Q 5) Thinking about the young people you work with, how confident do you think they are about their ability to avoid or navigate risky situations they encounter through: There was a very broad consensus from staff that most YP they worked with either knew a little about avoiding or navigating risk online across these platforms or were very confident. However staff felt that a significant minority (13.2% - 17%) did not know how to avoid or navigate risky situations online.
    41. 41. Q6) Thinking about the young people you work with, do you feel that they are more at risk than other young people when it comes to bullying and abuse online or via mobile phones ? <ul><li>Most felt that they were either more, or slightly more at risk, than other YP when it came to bullying and abuse online or via mobiles (62% combined) </li></ul>
    42. 42. Q 8) Have you ever received training on how young people use social media and how they are/may be at risk can online, for example addressing cyber-bullying ? <ul><li>70% of those who answered this question said that they had received training on how YP use social media and exposure to risks. </li></ul><ul><li>30% said ‘No’ </li></ul>
    43. 43. <ul><li>81% (48) said that they had an e-safety strategy (including AUPs) in place. 8 said they weren’t sure and 1 said “no” </li></ul>Q9) In your place of work (or organisation) is there an E-Safety strategy in place? For example Acceptable Use Policies reporting procedures, education for users etc ?
    44. 44. Feedback from survey and interviews <ul><li>34% replied saying that they were very equipped to deal with abuse and 12% saying they felt they were not equipped. </li></ul>
    45. 45. Q 10) In your work with young people do you feel you are properly equipped to deal with cases of online or mobile phone abuse? <ul><li>12% said they felt they were not equipped </li></ul><ul><li>54% somewhat equipped and </li></ul><ul><li>34% saying that they were very equipped to deal with abuse. </li></ul>
    46. 46. Q 11) In your work with vulnerable young people have you used Social Media or mobile technology positively to engage with your young learners ? <ul><li>Just under half of those interviewed had used social media positively to engage with young learners. Of those who hadn’t 30% said that they would like to. </li></ul>
    47. 47. Q 12) Would you be interested in contributing to the research and the production of resources through either: <ul><li>40 out of the 61 respondents asked to be contracted to contribute further to this work either on the telephone, meeting or attending one of the 2 workshops which were held. </li></ul>
    48. 48. <ul><li>DISCUSSION </li></ul>
    49. 49. Our PRU set up its own internal social network to allow interaction between staff and pupils. Southampton “ We don’t have a culture of panic here – especially re ICT issues. ICT is embedded in all we do - it’s now a life skill.” Parkside, Ipswich Work in progress IDENTIFYING GOOD PRACTICE TO INSPIRE OTHERS! THE POSITIVE ! “ Those who are shy are much more likely to use social media more than face to face as it helps break down communication barriers, esp for those with learning difficulties. Also – online games and tools for learning is a great way for children to learn and can be used at optimum times to suit different learning styles.” Suffolk “ We would like to start a sheltered environment to aid transition” Derbyshire “ We use it [SM] to keep in contact with YP, especially those who go missing.” Sheffield. Could these be little ‘vignettes’ re specific practical actions EG ‘ Facebook Fridays’ Good practice/examples
    50. 50. <ul><li>DISCUSSION </li></ul>
    51. 51. P olicies I nfrastructure E ducation Whole-school ongoing education & prevention programme which is targeted at both pupils, parents and the whole school work-force. E-safety policy, Acceptable Use Policy, Anti-Bullying policy , Mobile use policy Managed learning environment with high quality access and equipment which is filtered, monitored and supervised . PIE
    52. 52. Legalities of handling online disclosures. What is our duty of care and legal ramifications of viewing. We need positive examples of use for learning and meaningful engagement We need ‘hands-on’ catch up sessions on the basics and new trends of social media especially for our older staff (digital divide). (set up dummy A/Cs) Operational knowledge with clear guidance on how would you handle a certain situation not just theoretical discussion. + real information on % of risks not over-exaggeration Clear guidance on boundary issues for all staff ‘Friending’ YP eg fundraising, mentoring, organising events etc. including advice on recording, transparency, disclosure etc <ul><ul><li>“ I don’t use social networking so probably understand less than my students.” </li></ul></ul>What do staff need ? 1
    53. 53. Need help to embed this topic into wider Digital and Social and emotional literacy schemes to help develop resilience and reduce inappropriate actions. <ul><ul><li>“ I am sad and amazed at how little young people know how to protect themselves.” </li></ul></ul>We need advice about sanctions that work and advice about what to do re inappropriate and threatening messages from parents to other pupils. Not having access to Facebook in school is problematic as we can’t demonstrate safe use. We need clear guidance on how to use it in school breaks There is a really important international dimension and we need to learn from how other countries are tackling the use of social media in schools – Spain ‘A’ level in Moodle ! We must also learn the lessons which are coming from Serious Case Reviews What do staff need ? 2
    54. 54. “ Deliverables” need to be dynamic and not a set of do’s and don’ts. AUPS need to be positive NOT negative -expectation is that you do something wrong! <ul><ul><li>“ We need to build on this work and continue to allow students to be co-researchers and make sure that the focus is on participation in the delivery of learning”. </li></ul></ul>Advice needs to include the importance of putting the learner at the heart – including being the teacher. “Teachers are sometimes the worst learners!” We need really clear advice about ‘Taking, making and distributing’ inappropriate images (inc legal advice). So YP are not criminalised at early stage. We need to recognise the affects of increased exposure to more extreme pornography is having on issues of sexual discovery/identity and experience. “ We need good quality advice & training which is updated and ‘REAL’ to our context as we learn to exist more online for our YP.” What do staff need ? 3
    55. 55. R isk R eputation R esilience The 3 Rs of digital literacy
    56. 56. THANK YOU FOR COMING, FOR YOUR TIME AND FOR YOUR INPUT www.carrick-davies.com [email_address] Tel 07712451859 See www.carrick-davies.com/research/Excluded-YP.aspx

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