• Like
Shaw Leaders
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Published

working with a school based leadership team

working with a school based leadership team

Published in Education , Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
295
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Leading Tomorrow's Schools, Today June 2010
  • 2.
    • Stephen G Barkley
    • Executive Vice President
    • Performance Learning Systems
    • 6227 Lower Mountain Road
    • New Hope, PA 18938
    • 888.424.9700
    • [email_address]
    • www.plsweb.com
  • 3. Collective Capacity –Fullan(2010)
    • The power of collective capacity is that it enables ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary things—for two reasons:
    • ..knowledge about effective practice becomes more widely available and accessible on a daily basis
    • ...working together generates commitment
  • 4. Collective Capacity –Fullan(2010)
    • Moral purpose, when it stares you in the face through students and your peers working together to make lives and society better, is palpable, indeed virtually irresistible. The collective motivational well seems bottomless. The speed of effective change increases exponentially. Collective capacity, quite simply, gets more and deeper things done in shorter periods of time.
  • 5. CREATIVE IDEAS RISK CELEBRATIONS MEASUREMENT AND MODIFICATION VISION AND BELIEFS
  • 6. Together Toward Tomorrow
    • Vision/Mission/Beliefs
    • Creative Planning
    • Risk-taking Implementation
    • Measurement and Modification
    • Celebration
    • Steve Barkley
  • 7. Ready-Fire -Aim
    • Relationships first (too fast/too slow)
    • Honor the implementation dip
    • Beware of fat plans
    • Communication during implementation is paramount
    • Learn about implementation during implementation
    • Excitement prior to implementation is fragile
    • Take risks and learn
    • It is okay to be assertive
    • Michael Fullan- Motion Leadership: The Skinny on Becoming Change Savvy (2010)
  • 8. What do you believe
    • is the vision that should drive our work
    • are some of the greatest signs of student achievement in our school? signs for improvement?
    • are the areas of change and improvement your leadership team needs to explore
  • 9. These gaps begin before children arrive at the schoolhouse door. But, rather than organizing our educational system to ameliorate this problem, we organize it to exacerbate the problem.
  • 10. Results are devastating. Kids who come in a little behind, leave a lot behind.
  • 11. What We Hear Many Educators Say:
    • They’re poor
    • Their parents don’t care
    • They come to schools without breakfast
    • Not enough books
    • Not enough parents
    • N/A
  • 12. But if they are right, why are low-income students and students of color performing so much higher in some schools…
  • 13. On Our Website
    • VISION Shaw Elementary School of Hillsborough County will be in the top 1% of schools in the nation.
    • MISSION We will provide all students with the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to realize the potential.
  • 14. Personalizing the Picture
    • As a teacher/educator what are some of the beliefs that drive the work you do each day?
  • 15. Personalizing the Picture
    • As a teacher/educator what are some of the beliefs that drive the work you do each day?
    • How does being on the staff at Shaw, knowing your students needs, impact your vision/mission/beliefs?
  • 16. Personalizing the Picture
    • As a teacher/educator what are some of the beliefs that drive the work you do each day?
    • How does being on the staff at Shaw, knowing your students needs, impact your vision/mission/beliefs?
    • What skills and knowledge do you have to use to achieve your picture? What do you think you may need to learn?
  • 17. Ken Robinson
    • http://www.ted.com/talks/sir_ken_robinson_bring_on_the_revolution.html
  • 18. Focus: Change or Improve
    • Ken Robinson…
    • The Element: How Finding Your Passion Change Everything
    • … .education doesn’t need to be reformed—it needs to be transformed
    • My School focus….
    • Improve………………….
    • Change………………….
  • 19. Changes
    • What should students do/experience at school in order to learn the critical skills?
  • 20. Changes
    • What should students do/experience at school in order to learn the critical skills?
    • How do schools/teaching need to change to accommodate the needed student experiences?
  • 21. INSTRUCTIONAL CHANGES
    • What changes can we make to get the changes we seek in students?
    • Describe the teaching/learning process you wish to have happening.
  • 22. CREATIVITY
    • Collection
    • Incubation
    • Illumination
    • Verification
  • 23. 4 Shifts
    • Whole vs. Parts
    • Process vs. Structure
    • It’s all relationships
    • Goals vs. Targets
  • 24. Creativity Information Vision Relationships New CREATIVITY EXPERIMENTS Wheatly, M.J. and M. Kellner-Rogers, A Simpler Way .
  • 25. Information Flow Ask/Tell
  • 26. Relationships Diverse and rich relationships
  • 27. Teacher Relationships
    • Parallel Play
    • Adversarial Relationships
    • Congenial Relationships
    • Collegial Relationships
            • Roland S. Barth
            • Relationships Within the Schoolhouse
            • ASCD 2006
  • 28. Elementary School
  • 29. My Work My Time Design together Implement individually Shared responsibility for student achievement Helping each other Modify Individual Behavior, Consensus on implementation Individual Franchise Team
  • 30. Vulnerability Trust ACTION
  • 31. My Work My Time Design together Implement individually Shared responsibility for student achievement Helping each other Modify Individual Behavior, Consensus on implementation ACTION Individual Franchise Team Vulnerability Trust
  • 32. National Staff Development Council
    • Staff development that has as its goal high levels of learning for all students, teachers, and administrators requires a form of professional learning that is quite different from the workshop-driven approach. The most powerful forms of staff development occur in ongoing teams that meet on a regular basis, preferably several times a week, for the purposes of learning, joint lesson planning, and problem solving. These teams, often called learning communities or communities of practice, operate with a commitment to the norms of continuous improvement and experimentation and engage their members in improving their daily work to advance the achievement of school district and school goals for student learning. www.nsdc.org
  • 33. Analysis
    • Identify classrooms in your school that are closest to full implementation of your vision for learning.
    • Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.
    • Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.
  • 34. Analysis
    • Identify classrooms in your school that must change the most to reach full implementation of your vision for learning.
    • Describe in detail the observable students behaviors.
    • Describe in detail the observable teacher behaviors.
  • 35. Appraise
    • Consider one area of teacher practice that is crucial to your desired student achievement. Rank your classrooms along this continuum.
    • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
    • Most Full
    • Change Implementation
    • Needed
  • 36.
    • Rank teachers according to this system:
    • Unwilling
    • Unaware
    • Getting Ready
    • Started
    • Developing
  • 37. Unconsciously Talented Unconsciously Unskilled Consciously Unskilled Consciously Skilled Unconsciously Skilled
    • Gordon’s (1974) Skill Development Ladder
    Gordon’s Skill Development Ladder
  • 38. What leadership is needed to bring about the desired teacher performance ? EVALUATION Outside Criteria SUPERVISION MENTORING PEER COACHING Teacher’s Choice
  • 39. Joyce/Showers Research Figure 5.2 Training Components and Attainment of Outcomes in Terms of Percent of Participants Components Study of Theory Demonstrations Practice Peer Coaching Beverly Joyce and Bruce Showers (2002) Student Achievement Through Staff Development 3 rd Edition. Ch. 5: Designing Training and Peer Coaching: Our Needs for Learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Knowledge (thorough) 10 30 60 95 Skill (strong) 5 20 60 95 Transfer (executive implementation) 0 0 5 95 — OUTCOMES —
  • 40. Learning Dip
  • 41. Principal as Learner
    • Fullan …Motion Leadership (pg36)
    • … the link between principal action and student achievement, one finding is most powerful: the degree to which the principal participates as a learner in helping teachers figure out how to get classroom and schoolwide improvement (Robinson,Loyd,and Rowe 2008)
  • 42.  
  • 43. CONFIRMATORY PARAPHRASE FACTS ATTITUDES/ FEELINGS INTENTIONS
  • 44. PRACTICE
    • TEACHER: MY STUDENTS WON’T READ AN ASSIGNMENT SO I DON’T SEE HOW I CAN DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN PRESENT INFORMATION IN CLASS HOPING THEY WILL REMEMBER SOME OF IT.
  • 45.
    • TEACHER: MY STUDENTS WON’T READ AN ASSIGNMENT SO I DON’T SEE HOW I CAN DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN PRESENT INFORMATION IN CLASS HOPING THEY WILL REMEMBER SOME OF IT.
    • Fact
    • You have not been able to get many of the students to work outside of class.
  • 46.
    • TEACHER: MY STUDENTS WON’T READ AN ASSIGNMENT SO I DON’T SEE HOW I CAN DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN PRESENT INFORMATION IN CLASS HOPING THEY WILL REMEMBER SOME OF IT.
    • Feeling
    • You are worried that presenting information in class won’t get the student achievement that you want.
  • 47.
    • TEACHER: MY STUDENTS WON’T READ AN ASSIGNMENT SO I DON’T SEE HOW I CAN DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN PRESENT INFORMATION IN CLASS HOPING THEY WILL REMEMBER SOME OF IT.
    • Attitude
    • If students read outside of class you would teach very differently.
    • You want to find a way to get them to read outside of class.
  • 48. Gripes to Goals
  • 49. Gripes to Goals
    • Too many students don’t care about their grades… there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat.
  • 50. Gripes to Goals
    • Too many students don’t care about their grades… there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat.
    • You have a strong desire for your students to do well.
    • Grades just don’t seem to be it.
    • You see a need to find a different way to motivate your students.
  • 51. POSITIVE FEEDBACK
    • COMPLIMENT
    • PRAISE
    • APPROVAL
  • 52. APPROVAL
    • INDICATE APPROVAL
    • PERSONALIZE
    • CITE THE SPECIFICS
  • 53. EMPATHY
    • ACCEPT FEELING AND EMOTION
    • REFOCUS….PAST OR FUTURE
    • SUCCESS
    • … .ALTERNATIVE DIRECTION
  • 54. MY STUDENTS WON ’ T READ AN ASSIGNMENT SO I DON ’ T SEE HOW I CAN DO ANYTHING OTHER THAN PRESENT INFORMATION IN CLASS HOPING THEY WILL REMEMBER SOME OF IT.
    • Feeling
    • You are worried that presenting information in class won ’ t get the student achievement that you want.
    • Teaching students with a history of low performance is worrisome. Their success can be extremely uplifting and fulfilling.
  • 55. Practice Empathy Teacher- Looks like PLC’s will be decreasing my personal planning time. Teacher-This student has nor responded to a single intervention that the team has suggested and I am going to be held accountable.
  • 56. SUPPORTING STATEMENT UNQUALIFIED TOTALLY AGREE QUALIFIED AGREE WITH LIMITS SUPPORT FOR SOMETHINGELSE DISAGREE/PRIVATE ACCEPT REINFORCE ACCEPT PART GIVE LIMITS ACCEPT RIGHT TO OPINION SUPPORT SOMETHINGELSE
  • 57. Our principal expects too much..
    • UNQUALIFIED
    • TOTALLY AGREE
    • QUALIFIED
    • AGREE WITH LIMITS
    • SUPPORT FOR
    • SOMETHING ELSE
    • DISAGREE/PRIVATE
    • You are right. We won’t ever met that standard.
    • The principal’s expectations are very high. I believe we can improve.
    • The principal is a dreamer. I believe the dream of our students being successful is very important.
  • 58. Supporting Statement
    • Too many students don’t care about their grades… there is no way to motivate them to work. Failing them isn’t a threat.
    • Many student are not motivated by grades. Have you ever had a student who worked hard and did well and wasn’t interested in the grade?
  • 59. Collective Capacity –Fullan(2010) The power of collective capacity is that it enables ordinary people to accomplish extraordinary things—for two reasons: ..knowledge about effective practice becomes more widely available and accessible on a daily basis ...working together generates commitment
  • 60. Collective Capacity –Fullan(2010) Moral purpose, when it stares you in the face through students and your peers working together to make lives and society better, is palpable, indeed virtually irresistible. The collective motivational well seems bottomless. The speed of effective change increases exponentially. Collective capacity, quite simply, gets more and deeper things done in shorter periods of time.