Chapter 5Early Atomic Theory and Structure                                                        Lightning               ...
Chapter Outline5.1 Early Thoughts                        5.5 Discovery of Ions5.2 Dalton’s Model of the Atom 5.6 Subatomic...
Early ThoughtsThe earliest models of the atom were developed by the  ancient Greek philosophers.Empedocles (about 440 B.C....
Dalton’s Model of the Atom (1803-1810)1. Elements are composed of minute, indivisible    particles called atoms.   – Atoms...
Dalton’s Model of the Atom (cont.)5. Chemical compounds are formed by the union    of two or more atoms of different eleme...
Law of Multiple ProportionsAtoms of two or more elements may combine in  different ratios to produce more than one compoun...
Your Turn!Which of the following statements in Dalton’s atomic  theory has had to be modified or discarded in  modern atom...
Your Turn!Which pair of formulas illustrates the law of multiple  proportions?a. CH3Cl and CH3OHb. H2O and HOHc. CuCl2 and...
The Nature of Electric Charge1.    Charge may be of two types: positive and negative.2.    Unlike charges attract and like...
Your Turn!Which of the following sets of ions have the greatest  force of attraction?a. Fe2+ and Na+                      ...
Your Turn!As the distance between two oppositely charged  particles increases, the force of attraction willa. Increase    ...
Discovery of IonsMichael Faraday (1791-1867)• Discovered that compounds  dissolved in water contain  charged particles.• T...
Discovery of IonsSvante Arrhenius (1859-1927)• He reasoned that an ion is an atom carrying a positive  or negative charge....
Subatomic Parts of the AtomCathode Rays (Electrons)• Discovered by J. J.  Thomson in 1897• Travel in straight lines• Are n...
ElectronsThe electron (e-) is a particle with• a mass of 9.110×10-28 g or 1/1837 mass of a hydrogen  atom.• a relative cha...
Your Turn!Cathode rays area. Ionsb. Electronsc. Protonsd. Neutrons                   Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Subatomic Parts of the AtomProtons  A relative charge of +1.  Mass is 1837 times the mass of an electron.Thompson’s Plum P...
Subatomic Parts of the AtomJ. J. Thompson proposed that ions result from the loss   and gain of electrons                 ...
Periodic PlacementThe position of the element on the Periodic Table gives  clues to the type of ion because of the valence...
Subatomic Parts of the AtomNeutrons  Discovered by James Chadwick in 1932.  Neutral charge                 Copyright 2012 ...
Your Turn!A proton is aa. Cationb. Anionc. None of the above                 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Your Turn!A neutron is aa. Cationb. Anionc. None of the above                 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Your Turn!What is the relative mass of an electron?a. Slightly larger than a protonb. Slightly smaller than a protonc. 1/1...
Mass and Number of AtomsCalculate number of atoms in 25 g of hydrogen, if each  hydrogen atom has a mass of 1.673×10-24 g....
Your Turn!The mass of a copper atom is 1.045x10 -22 g. How many  copper atoms are present in a 94.5g sample of  copper?a. ...
The Nuclear Atom  Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Rutherford’s Experiment            Observation                               HypothesisMost alpha rays passed through     ...
Nuclear AtomProtons and neutrons make up the dense, positive nucleus.Electrons occupy the empty space outside the nucleus....
Your Turn!The mass of an atom is primarily determined by the  mass of itsa. Protonsb. Neutronsc. Electronsd. Protons and n...
Atomic Number of the Elements• The atomic number of an element is the number of  protons in the nucleus.• The atomic numbe...
Your Turn!Use a periodic table to determine the atomic number of  potassium. Which of the following is true?a. Potassium h...
Isotopes of the ElementsIsotopes are atoms of an element with the same atomic  number but different masses.Isotopes have d...
Isotopic Notation                                                         31Phosphorus-31 is the only stable P isotope. P ...
Isotopes Complete the table:Element Symbol Atomic Mass No. of  No. of    No. Of                No.   No. Protons Electrons...
Your Turn!Carbon-14 dating involves measuring the amount                                               14  of C-14 remaini...
Your Turn!Approximately 50.70% of all atoms of bromine are 79 Br                                                 35  atoms...
Atomic MassThe mass of an atom is so small that a table of relative  atomic masses using atomic mass units was devised.• T...
Atomic Mass     Isotope   Isotopic mass        Abundance            Average atomic mass                   (amu)           ...
Your TurnBromine has two stable isotopes: Br-79 (50.70%) and  Br-81 (49.32%). The atomic masses are 78.92 amu  and 80.92 a...
QuestionsReview Questions (pg 95)  – Do 1, 3, 5,  – Practice later 2 – 6 evenPaired Questions  – Do 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 2...
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NWTC General Chemistry Ch 05

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  • Figure 5.3 Cathode ray tube. A stream of electrons passes between electrodes. The fast moving particles excite the gas inside the tube creating a greenish glow between the electrodes.
  • Figure 5.4 Thompson’s Model of the Atom In this early model of the atom, negative particles (electrons) were thought to be embedded in a positively charged sphere. It is sometimes called the plum pudding model.
  • Figure 5.5 (a) When one or more electrons are lost from an atom, a cation is formed. (b) When one or more electrons are added to a neutral atom, an anion is formed.
  • Figure 5.7 In the nuclear model of the atom, protons (p) and neutrons (n) are located in the nucleus. The electrons are found in the remainder of the atom (which is mostly empty space because electrons are very tiny).
  • Figure 5.8 The isotopes of hydrogen. The number of protons (purple) and neutrons (blue) are shown within the nucleus. The electron (e-) exists outside the nucleus.
  • NWTC General Chemistry Ch 05

    1. 1. Chapter 5Early Atomic Theory and Structure Lightning occurs when electrons move to neutralize a charge difference between Introduction to General, Organic, and Biochemistry 10e the clouds John Wiley & Sons, Inc and the Morris Hein, Scott Pattison, and Susan Arena Earth
    2. 2. Chapter Outline5.1 Early Thoughts 5.5 Discovery of Ions5.2 Dalton’s Model of the Atom 5.6 Subatomic Parts of the5.3 Composition of Atom Compounds 5.7 The Nuclear Atom5.4 The Nature of Electric 5.8 Isotopes of the Elements Charge 5.9 Atomic Mass Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    3. 3. Early ThoughtsThe earliest models of the atom were developed by the ancient Greek philosophers.Empedocles (about 440 B.C.) stated that all matter was composed of four “elements” – earth, wind, fire and water.Democritus (about 470-370 B.C.) thought all forms of matter were composed of tiny indivisible particles, called atoms, derived from the Greek work for indivisible. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    4. 4. Dalton’s Model of the Atom (1803-1810)1. Elements are composed of minute, indivisible particles called atoms. – Atoms are made up of smaller particles2. Atoms of the same element are alike in mass and size. – Isotopes of elements exist3. Atoms of different elements have different masses and sizes. – Isotopes like C-14 and N-14 make this incorrect Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    5. 5. Dalton’s Model of the Atom (cont.)5. Chemical compounds are formed by the union of two or more atoms of different elements. – Still true H2O6. Atoms combine to form compounds in simple numerical ratios. – Still true7. Atoms of two elements may combine in different ratios to form more than one compound. H2O2 – Still true Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    6. 6. Law of Multiple ProportionsAtoms of two or more elements may combine in different ratios to produce more than one compound. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    7. 7. Your Turn!Which of the following statements in Dalton’s atomic theory has had to be modified or discarded in modern atomic theory?a. Atoms of the same element are alike in mass and size.b. Chemical compounds are formed by the union of two or more atoms of different elements.c. Atoms combine to form compounds in simple numerical ratios. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    8. 8. Your Turn!Which pair of formulas illustrates the law of multiple proportions?a. CH3Cl and CH3OHb. H2O and HOHc. CuCl2 and CuBrd. Na2O and Na2O2 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    9. 9. The Nature of Electric Charge1. Charge may be of two types: positive and negative.2. Unlike charges attract and like charges repel.3. Charge may be transferred by contact or induction.4. Force of attraction between ions is – Reduced by distance between charges (r) – Increased by increasing charge (q) kq1q 2 Coulombs Law: F= where k is a constant. r2 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    10. 10. Your Turn!Which of the following sets of ions have the greatest force of attraction?a. Fe2+ and Na+ kq1q 2b. Fe2+ and O2- Coulombs Law: F = r2c. Fe3+ and O2- • With the distance the same, only the charge matters. • The greater the charge, the greater the force of attraction Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    11. 11. Your Turn!As the distance between two oppositely charged particles increases, the force of attraction willa. Increase kq1q 2b. Decrease Coulombs Law: F = r2c. Remain the same Since the distance is squared, it has a HUGE impact on the force of attraction Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    12. 12. Discovery of IonsMichael Faraday (1791-1867)• Discovered that compounds dissolved in water contain charged particles.• These charged particles conduct electricity.• Coined the term “ion” from the Greek word “wanderer.” Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    13. 13. Discovery of IonsSvante Arrhenius (1859-1927)• He reasoned that an ion is an atom carrying a positive or negative charge.• Both positive and negative ions are present in a compound so the molten compound conducts electricity.• Cations move toward negative electrode (cathode)• Anions move toward positive electrode (anode) Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    14. 14. Subatomic Parts of the AtomCathode Rays (Electrons)• Discovered by J. J. Thomson in 1897• Travel in straight lines• Are negatively charged• Are deflected by electrical and magnetic fields Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    15. 15. ElectronsThe electron (e-) is a particle with• a mass of 9.110×10-28 g or 1/1837 mass of a hydrogen atom.• a relative charge of -1.• a diameter of less than 10-12 cm. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    16. 16. Your Turn!Cathode rays area. Ionsb. Electronsc. Protonsd. Neutrons Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    17. 17. Subatomic Parts of the AtomProtons A relative charge of +1. Mass is 1837 times the mass of an electron.Thompson’s Plum Pudding Model (proposed in 1904) Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    18. 18. Subatomic Parts of the AtomJ. J. Thompson proposed that ions result from the loss and gain of electrons Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    19. 19. Periodic PlacementThe position of the element on the Periodic Table gives clues to the type of ion because of the valence electrons. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    20. 20. Subatomic Parts of the AtomNeutrons Discovered by James Chadwick in 1932. Neutral charge Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    21. 21. Your Turn!A proton is aa. Cationb. Anionc. None of the above Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    22. 22. Your Turn!A neutron is aa. Cationb. Anionc. None of the above Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    23. 23. Your Turn!What is the relative mass of an electron?a. Slightly larger than a protonb. Slightly smaller than a protonc. 1/1837 the mass of a proton Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    24. 24. Mass and Number of AtomsCalculate number of atoms in 25 g of hydrogen, if each hydrogen atom has a mass of 1.673×10-24 g. 1 atom 25g × = 1.5x1025 atoms 1.673×10-24 g Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    25. 25. Your Turn!The mass of a copper atom is 1.045x10 -22 g. How many copper atoms are present in a 94.5g sample of copper?a. 9.04 X 10 23b. 1.045 X 10 -22c. 1870d. 94.5 94.5 g 1 atom = 9.04 X 10 23 atom 1.045x10 -22 g Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    26. 26. The Nuclear Atom Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    27. 27. Rutherford’s Experiment Observation HypothesisMost alpha rays passed through Most of the volume of anAu as if nothing was there! atom is empty spaceSome alpha rays were deflected as The nucleus or center ofif repelled by a like charge the atom is positive.particle.Some bounced back as if they Most of the mass of theencountered something very atom is in the nucleus.dense. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    28. 28. Nuclear AtomProtons and neutrons make up the dense, positive nucleus.Electrons occupy the empty space outside the nucleus.A neutral atom contains the same number of electrons and protons. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    29. 29. Your Turn!The mass of an atom is primarily determined by the mass of itsa. Protonsb. Neutronsc. Electronsd. Protons and neutronse. Protons, neutrons and electrons Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    30. 30. Atomic Number of the Elements• The atomic number of an element is the number of protons in the nucleus.• The atomic number determines the identity of the element.Example: Sodium has an atomic number of 11 so every sodium atom has 11 protons. Since a neutral atom of Na has 11 protons, it also has 11 electrons. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    31. 31. Your Turn!Use a periodic table to determine the atomic number of potassium. Which of the following is true?a. Potassium has 15 protons and 15 electrons.b. Potassium has 15 protons and 31 electrons.c. Potassium has 19 protons and 19 electrons.d. Potassium has 19 protons and 39 electrons. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    32. 32. Isotopes of the ElementsIsotopes are atoms of an element with the same atomic number but different masses.Isotopes have different numbers of neutron.The mass number is the sum of protons and neutrons. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    33. 33. Isotopic Notation 31Phosphorus-31 is the only stable P isotope. P 15The neutral atom has 15 protons and 15 electrons.Number of neutrons = 31 - 15 = 16 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    34. 34. Isotopes Complete the table:Element Symbol Atomic Mass No. of No. of No. Of No. No. Protons Electrons Neutrons 37chlorine 17 Cl 17 37 17 17 20 204 lead 82 Pb 82 204 82 82 122 38argon 18 Ar 18 38 18 18 20 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    35. 35. Your Turn!Carbon-14 dating involves measuring the amount 14 of C-14 remaining in a fossil. How many 6 C neutrons does this radioactive isotope have?a. 14b. 6c. 8d. 20 Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    36. 36. Your Turn!Approximately 50.70% of all atoms of bromine are 79 Br 35 atoms. How many neutrons, protons and electrons does this isotope of bromine have?a. 79 neutrons, 35 protons and 35 electronsb. 44 neutrons, 35 protons and 35 electronsc. 35 neutrons, 79 protons and 35 electronsd. 44 neutrons, 35 protons and 44 electronse. 79 neutrons, 35 protons and 44 electrons Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    37. 37. Atomic MassThe mass of an atom is so small that a table of relative atomic masses using atomic mass units was devised.• The atomic mass unit (amu) is defined as 1/12 mass of a C-12 atom. 1 amu = 1.6606x10-24g• Atomic mass is a weighted average of the naturally occurring isotopes of an element compared to the atomic mass of carbon-12. Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    38. 38. Atomic Mass Isotope Isotopic mass Abundance Average atomic mass (amu) (%) (amu) 12 12.000 98.97 6 C 12.01 13 C 13.003 1.11 6Atomic mass of Carbon:98.97% 12C (12.000 amu) + 1.11% 13C (13.003 amu) = 12.01 amu Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    39. 39. Your TurnBromine has two stable isotopes: Br-79 (50.70%) and Br-81 (49.32%). The atomic masses are 78.92 amu and 80.92 amu respectively. Determine the average atomic mass of bromine.a. 50.70 amub. 78.92 amu Percent of 1 * mass of 1 + Percent of 2 * mass of 2 =c. 80.00 amu Average Atomic Massd. 79.92 amu 50.70% 79Br (78.92 amu) + 49.32% 81Br (80.92 amu)= Average atomic mass (0.5070 * 78.92 amu) + (0.4932 * 80.92 amu) = 79.92 amu Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc
    40. 40. QuestionsReview Questions (pg 95) – Do 1, 3, 5, – Practice later 2 – 6 evenPaired Questions – Do 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, 33, 37 – Practice later every other even (2, 6, etc) Copyright 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc 1-43

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