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Morning calm weekly 130125 Morning calm weekly 130125 Document Transcript

  • The latest news from the Army in Korea is available online at: www.Army.mil/KoreaJanuary 25, 2013 Published for those serving in the Republic of Korea Volume 11, Issue 14Watch out for foreign agentsAuthorities say spies eye U.S. troops in hopes of gleaning intelligenceBy Franklin Fisher a bigger picture of what’s happeningfranklin.s.fisher2.civ@mail.mil on Camp Casey” for example, Douglas said. CAMP RED CLOUD – It’s a Friday “Something as simple as when yournight and a group of Soldiers are get- unit is set to go to the field or when they’reting the weekend started at their favor- set to start the next exercise” can give for-ite bar off post. eign spies something useful, he said. It’s a place where the Soldiers feel “Which then can lead to, ‘Okay, well,comfortable, where they can unwind, if we know they’re going to have an ex-talk smack, drink beer and where they ercise, we know they’re going to haveand the bar employees know one an- convoy operations at this time,” he said.other by first name. The Soldiers feel “It can lead to several other avenues.”themselves among friends. Other types of routine information But according to U.S. Army intelli- can help foreign agents stitch thingsgence authorities, friends aren’t neces- together.sarily the only ones in the room. Who’s on the unit alert roster? How There may also be intelligence op- many Soldiers in the unit? What’s theeratives working for foreign govern- Soldier’s job? What’s his security clear-ments – spies – trying to blend in and ance level? How long does he expect topick up even the most routine items be stationed in Korea? Does he haveof information, said Warrant Officer friends planning on requesting an ex-Christopher Douglas of the 524th Mili- tension on their Korea tour?tary Intelligence Battalion. Agents can also look to start conver- With infinite patience, reeling in sations with Soldiers.one seemingly unimportant detail at “Maybe he buys him a beer, buysa time, they can gradually fit together him a drink and they just chat,” said– as they would a jigsaw puzzle – a pic- Douglas.ture of how the U.S. military is operat- And if they can ease an unsuspect-ing in a given area of Korea. ing Soldier into any kind of friendly So intelligence authorities are re- relationship, that opens even biggerminding Soldiers to be on their guard possibilities for trained spies.against foreign intelligence agents. If the Soldier needs money, theAnd that if they think someone might agent may offer it.be a foreign agent, to report their sus- “Maybe that person doesn’t even askpicions to the authorities right away. for anything in return for the money,” “Soldiers may go out and have a said Douglas. “Maybe they say, ‘Hey,good time and not realize that they’re here’s the money. I don’t need any-being watched or listened to,” said thing in return right now but later on IDouglas. may need a favor.’” A typical hunting ground for foreign And agents may even find a way toagents is any place they know draws maneuver the Soldier to where he orU.S. servicemembers. That could be she can be blackmailed.the “Ville” outside Camp Casey in In a bar it could be inappropriateDongducheon, for example. Or the behavior with a female bar worker, be-Itaewon section of Seoul. Or countless havior that someone gets a picture orother places throughout Korea where video of with a cellphone camera.U.S. servicemembers congregate. “This,” Douglas said, “could lead to The agents can get useful informa- a blackmailing situation where you’retion just by getting within earshot of presented with these photos anda group of Soldiers. Especially Soldiers someone basically saying ‘Hey, eitherwho may be drinking, and talking you help me out, give me this informa-loudly and carelessly. tion, or these will be sent back home to “It may seem not important, but to your spouse or to your command.” This World War II U.S. government poster warned of the need to beware of enemy spies.someone who’s piecing together in- U.S. Army intelligence authorities say that vigilance against foreign spies is just asformation, they may be able to glean See “Spying” on page 4 necessary for U.S. troops in Korea today. GARRISONSInside Modern Army Former interns Cmd. Perspective P02 Combatives pursue careers at MP Blotter P02 USAG Red Cloud P04 at Camp Carroll Camp Humphreys USAG Casey P04 USAG Yongsan P07 See See USAG Humphreys P15 PAGE 12 PAGE 15 USAG Daegu P21 Feature Page P12
  • NEWS • PAGE 2www.army.mil/korea MORNING CALM THE MORNING CALM DECEMBER 14, 2012 MORNING CALM PAGE 3 www.army.mil/korea The Morning Calm Published by The United States Army Garrison Humphreys Public Affairs Office Managing Editor: Edward N. Johnson Senior Editor: Pvt. Ma Jae-sang USAG RED CLOUD Commander: Col. John M. Scott ACAP preps Soldiers for return to civilian life Public Affairs Officer: Kevin Jackson Writer/Editor: Franklin Fisher Public Affairs NCOIC: Sgt. 1st Class Jeff Troth Staff Writer: Pfc. Lee Seong-su CAMP RED CLOUD – When peo- to Work (VOW) to Hire Heroes Act of USAG YONGSAN Commander: Col. Michael L. Masley ple look back on their military service 2011, which Congress passed and Presi- Public Affairs Officer: Mark Abueg there’s one thing they’re almost sure to dent Obama signed into law. The Army Writer/Editor: Sgt. Choi Sung-il remember the rest of their lives: that wants to leave no stone unturned in Staff Writers: Sgt. Kevin Frazier, Cpl. Han Samuel, Pfc. Lee Hyo-kang sudden shock they underwent in the giving our Soldiers the best possible Intern: Susan MacDonald transition from civilian to Soldier. preparation for their transition to ci- We all remember it, that first en- vilian life. USAG HUMPHREYS counter with a pack of snarling drill This October, under terms of the Commander: Col. Darin S. Conkright Public Affairs Officer: Edward N. Johnson sergeants, the rigors of adjusting body President’s Veterans Employment Command Information Officer: Steven Hoover and mind to whole new levels of per- Initiative, Soldiers in ACAP will have Staff Writer: Sgt. Ma Jae-sang formance. Then AIT, and after that, our the option of still more help applying USAG DAEGU first unit, with us fresh out of training for college or technical training. It in- Commander: Col. Kathleen A. Gavle and no clue that a friendly joke’s being cludes submitting an application to Public Affairs Officer: Philip Molter played when we’re sent to the supply or getting an acceptance letter from a Command Information Officer: Mary Grimes Staff Writer: Cpl. Jeong Hyuk-soo, sergeant for “a box of grid squares.” learning institution. Training in entre- Pfc. Chin, Hyun-joon But if the early phase of military preneurship will also be offered. Intern: Lee Seung-bin, Kim Hye-in, Park Gi-bum life is a transition we won’t likely for- Unit leaders too have an impor- get, there’s another transition awaiting tant – and mandatory – role in all this. This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for us. It’s as important and in some ways Each commander, sergeant major and members of the Department of Defense. Contents of even more challenging: the transition first sergeant is responsible for ensur- The Morning Calm are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department out of the military and back into the — Col. John M. Scott — ing Soldiers start getting ACAP’s help of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial civilian world. at an early stage in the transition pro- content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of U.S. Army Garrisons in Korea. Circulation: 9,500 Hours ago you were a Soldier. Sud- a well-composed resume ready to go, cess: not later than 12 months from denly, you’re a veteran. Now what? well-ahead of ETS. The counselor their scheduled departure if they’re in Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way Veterans need jobs, or to start or re- helps with that too. the Active or Reserve components, and connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with the Contracting Command. The sume college or vocational training. But that’s far from all. continued participation in ACAP until PAID ADVERTISING - FULL PAGE civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. But hold on. Get a job? What kind? Also under ACAP, Veterans Admin- they’re discharged. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute Resume? How do you do that and get it istration representatives brief Soldiers Soldiers can get started by contact- endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the right? Job interviews? What’s it take to on what benefits they can expect. And ing our ACAP Center in newly reno- products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, make that a success? Applying to col- the U.S. Department of Labor briefs vated Maude Hall, building 2440, on use or patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, lege? How? What’s it involve? them on what benefits it provides. Camp Casey. The center’s phone num- national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, Fortunately, for the challenges await- That includes the all-important un- ber is 730-4033. And there’s an ACAP political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this ing our new veterans there’s some really employment checks that help tide over website: www.acap.army.mil. equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, outstanding help awaiting them too. the newly-minted veteran until he or I’m excited that ACAP is giving this the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation of the equal opportunity policy It’s called ACAP – the Army Career she finds new employment. generation of Soldiers such practical, is corrected. and Alumni Program. To help avoid bad spending and results-oriented preparation, tailored Oriental Press President: Charles Chong The Army has developed it to afford other financial mistakes that can mar to the real-world challenges that await Commercial Advertising Soldiers plenty of hands-on help in the re-entry to civilian life, ACAP helps them when they return to civilian life. Telephone: DSN 315-738-5005 ramp-up to re-entering civilian life. with such basics as how to draw up and The U.S. Army Garrison Red Cloud Fax: (02) 790-5795 E-mail: oppress@kornet.net This help kicks in well before – at keep to a 12-month budget. and Area I stands ready to do our full Mail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758 least a full year before – that re-entry Until recently, only the pre-separa- part in ensuring that our Soldiers here Location: Bldg. 1440, Yongsan, Main Post rolls around. tion counseling had been mandatory in Warrior Country make the most of SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: ACAP pairs Soldiers with counsel- for Soldiers. Whether they asked for this terrific program. Phone: DSN 738-4068 ors who give face-to-face guidance. the other forms of ACAP help was left Because for the big culture shock E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil The counselor helps draft a realistic up to them. and other challenges in the transition game plan for that transition. But as of last November the full ar- from Soldier back to civilian, you need The Department of the Army makes ray of ACAP services became manda- to gear up early so you’ll be truly good it a requirement that the Soldier have tory under the Veterans Opportunity to go. x Military Police Blotter The following entries were excerpted from the police blotters of the previous week. These entries may be incomplete and do not imply guilt or innocence. Area I: transported the Subject to Gate #6, The USAG-Daegu (Walker) PMO Failure to Obey (Escort Viola- USAG-Yongsan where MP confirmed was notified by C&S gate guards tion); Initial Report: The USAG- the subject was a USFK member and at Gate #2, USAG-Daegu (Henry) Red Cloud PMO was notified of an then transported the Subject to Brain that the Subject was observed Escort Violation by the gate guards. Allgood Army Community Hospital walking into the gate without an Investigation revealed the subject (BAACH), USAG-Yongsan. The Sub- ID card. The Subject further failed (U.S. Invited Contractor) signed a ject underwent command directed to provide his correct social secu- Submitting stories or photos to guest, onto USAG-Red Cloud but LBAT, with results pending. The Sub- rity number to the gate guards. The Morning Calm failed to deregister the guest within ject was kept in the BAACH for ob- MP responded and obtained the 24 hours. The Subject was pro- servation. Later in the afternoon, the subject’s social security number Send your Letters to the Editor, guest commen- cessed and released to his supervi- subject was transported to the USAG- which was run through DBIDS re- taries, story submissions, photos and other sor. Yongsan PMO, administered a PBT, vealing the subject was under the items to: MorningCalmWeekly@korea.army.mil. Area II: with a result of 0.121% BAC, processed, age of 21. MP detected a strong All items are subject to editing for content and to Fail to Obey General Order- and released to her unit, with instruc- odor of an unknown alcoholic bev- insure they conform with DoD guidelines. Underage Drinking; Initial Re- tions to return on a later date. erage emitting from the Subject’. port: The Itaewon KNP Box notified The subject was administered a the USAG-Yongsan PMO of a highly Area IV: PBT, with a result of 0.189% BAC. The Morning Calm Online Edition: intoxicated individual on the steps Fail to Obey General Order- Un- The subject was processed and re- www.army.mil/korea of the KNP Box in Itaewon. KNP derage Drinking; Initial Report: leased to his unit.
  • USAG-RC • PAGE 4http://redcloud.korea.army.mil USAG RED CLOUD THE MORNING CALM On the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his historic “I Have a Dream” speech before hundreds ofthousands who took part in the March on Washington. King’s soaring oration marked a pivotal juncture in the American Civil Rights Movement and is seen as one of the landmarkevents in American history. King was remembered at Camp Casey during a Jan. 15 observance of his birthday. – Photo by Bob Adelman/Magnum PhotosMartin Luther King Jr. remembered in Area ISpeaker says King had immense impact on improved race relations, civil rightsBy Franklin Fisher where they will not be judged by the color of their program, the audience heard brief remarks by Col.franklin.s.fisher2.civ@mail.mil skin but by the content of their character.” Lou Rago, Commander, 1st ABCT, and a vocalist Pleasant next quoted the final speech of King’s and musicians from the 2 ID’s jazz band performed CAMP RED CLOUD – The life and words of life, given April 3, 1968, in Memphis, Tenn. “Amazing Grace.” xDr. Martin Luther King Jr. played a profound role In that speech King said “And whenever men andin helping America move toward greater racial women straighten their backs up, they are going Pfc. Lee Seong-su contributed to this story.harmony and respect for civil rights, a guest speaker somewhere, because a man can’t ride your backat Camp Casey told an audience attending a Jan. 15 unless it is bent.”observance of King’s birthday. And from the same speech, Pleasant quoted these “There was Martin Luther King, trying to make words, from near the close:America what it is today,” the speaker, Herbert “But it really doesn’t matter with me now, becausePleasant, told the audience of about 120 in the I’ve been to the mountaintop…And I’ve looked over,ballroom of the Warrior’s Club. and I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there Pleasant is director of the Community Activity with you, but I want you to know tonight, that we, asCenter at Camp Hovey. The event was hosted by the a people, will get to the Promised Land.”2nd Infantry Division’s 1st Armored Brigade Combat “Today,” said Pleasant, “America has grown,”Team. from the days when King crusaded against racial King was an internationally preeminent civil segregation and other forms of racial discriminationrights leader and recipient of a 1964 Nobel Peace to the present day, when, in the U.S. military forPrize. He was shot to death in Memphis, Tenn, April example, servicemembers of different races serve4, 1968. He was 39. harmoniously. During his remarks Pleasant put special emphasis In a subsequent interview with the Morningon several of King’s more famous statements, one Calm, Pleasant said that thanks largely to King,of them from the historic “I Have a Dream” speech, “we’re drinking from the same water fountain,delivered Aug. 28, 1963, on the steps of the Lincoln everybody’s getting along, rather than being separateMemorial in Washington, D.C. King spoke before – blacks here, whites there. Back in the Sixties, hean audience of hundreds of thousands who came was struggling to make us one, everyone with equalfrom around America to participate in the March on rights.” Herbert Pleasant, director of the Camp Hovey CommunityWashington. The event also featured a slide presentation on Activity Center, delivers at Camp Casey keynote remarks During the speech, King said “I have a dream, that King’s life, during which a recording was played during a Jan. 15 observance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’smy four little children will one day live in a nation of the “I Have a Dream” speech. Also during the birthday. – U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Lee Seong-su Spying from Page 1 “The main thing we want them espionage activity can be reported to punishable under the Uniform Code of hinder enemy spying. But he said thoseto do,” Douglas said of Soldiers who the Uijeongbu Military Intelligence Military Justice. cases have occurred.suspect spying, ‘is, first, remain calm. Detachment at 010-3695-0370. “By not saying something, one could “Because of the efforts of SoldiersRemain calm while it’s happening or Reports can also be made – from make the argument you’re allowing it and civilians reporting suspiciousif you suspect it’s happening. Make anywhere in Korea – by calling DSN to happen,” Douglas said. activity,” said Douglas, “intelligencemental notes. After the encounter, jot 723-3299. Or by contacting the unit For security reasons Douglas could professionals have been able to detect,them down.” S-2 office. not disclose examples of actual cases identify, neutralize and sometimes In Area I, suspected foreign Failing to report such activity is where reports from Soldiers helped counter these threats in Korea.” x
  • JANUARY 25, 2013 USAG RED CLOUD USAG-RC • PAGE 5 http://redcloud.korea.army.mil News & Notes Special Operations Recruiting Cancelled Recruitment briefings for special operations and other duty that were scheduled for Camp Casey from Jan 31 – Feb. 1, have been cancelled. For more information, e-mail Sgt. 1st Class Randall Howard at randall.e.howard@mail.mil. Free Basketball Game in Seoul Free tickets and buses from Warrior Country to the Korea Basketball League game, 7 p.m. Feb. 7 at Jamsil Basketball Stadium in Seoul are available on a first-come, first-served basis through the USO. The Kim Sullins, a teacher at Casey Elementary School, reads a Czech folk tale, “Tall, Wide and Sharp–eye” to children during the Seoul Samsung Thunders faceschool’s Read Around the World event Jan. 15. It gave students a chance to learn about other countries while also further developing off with the Dongbu Promy Protheir listening comprehension skills. – U.S. Army photo by Sgt. 1st Class Jeff Troth Basketball Club. The USO willStudents go around the world in 120 minutes make available 150 tickets to Defense Department ID card holders. A bus will leave Camp Casey’s Community ActivityBy Sgt. 1st Class Jeff Troth “I wanted the kids to know more different information to organize the Center, bldg. 2236, at 4 p.m. Ajefferey.l.troth.mil@mail.mil about Italy,” said Chiara Hunter. story. bus will leave the Camp Red “Normally on an Army post you will “It helps us remember parts of the Cloud Community Activity CAMP CASEY – Casey Elementary see wives from Germany or Puerto story,” said second-grader Paul Davis, Center, bldg. 2, at 4:30 p.m.School students grabbed their Rico, but not too many Italian wives, son of Maj. Paul Davis, of Company Those wanting transportationpassports, buckled their seatbelts and so I decided to represent myself and let B, Headquarters and Headquarters must RSVP. For tickets and moreturned on their listening ears to enjoy the kids know about my country and Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division. “It information, call the USO ata trip around the world without even an Italian Christmas tale I don’t’ think helps us with what comes first – the 730-4813, or call the Communityleaving school grounds Jan. 15. American children now about.” setting, character and problem.” Activity Centers. Almost 70 students, along with Hunter’s book was an Italian folk Those three parts make uptheir parents, took part in the school’s tale – “Befana” – an old lady who the triangle which represents the Newcomers’ OrientationRead Around the World. For the delivers gifts to children throughout beginning of all stories. The middle An orientation for Soldiers,afternoon reading trip, the children Italy on Jan. 5, Epiphany Eve. She is represented with a square to signify spouses and civilians who arehad the opportunity to visit four of chose the story because “it is simple four events that happen in the story. newcomers to Area I is scheduledeight “countries” the school had set and represents what is important for The end of the story is represented for Jan. 28 from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.up in their classrooms. The children’s Italian children at Christmas time.” with a circle which brings everything at the Army Community Servicechoices included the Czech Republic, But the day was also about together. classroom in bldg. 2451 at CampTurkey, Germany and the Choctaw comprehending what was read to The volunteers brought together Casey. The orientation will cover,Nation. them. more than just stories from their among other topics, medical “We sent out a message and asked “Continuous School Improvement, countries, they also brought the music services, commissary and otherwho would like to volunteer to read, or CSI, is what we are doing at the and foods of their homeland. on-post shopping, and Koreanand the volunteers chose their country,” school to help our students where we “Puerto Rico was my favorite culture. For more information,said Jessica Gudeman, a kindergarten see the need is,” said Gudeman. “We country,” said Davis. “I liked the call 730-3107.teacher and co-chair person for the are working this year to get our kids to dancing.”reading event. “We had some teachers comprehend what they are reading and In keeping with the theme of Free foodstep up to share where they were from. to understand what they are hearing in world travel, each student received Free finger food will be availableThey wanted to share that part of their the stories.” a “passport” prior to beginning their for Customer Appreciation Nightculture and history with the kids.” The Casey Elementary School journey. Before departing a country at the Gateway Club on Camp But it wasn’t just staff that read to Wolves adopted a “go chart” to help the storytellers affixed to the page a Casey Jan. 29 from 8 – 9 p.m. Forthe students, Gudeman said. students make connections about sticker of their country’s flag. more information, call 730-3400. “We also had parents who what is happening in the story. The When their travels were complete,volunteered, we had a parent from school’s go chart breaks the story the students showed their passports toKorea read about Korea and Mrs. into three parts – beginning, middle the school’s “customs” agents who gave 2ID Band Seeks VocalistsHunter who is from Italy come in and and end – with each part represented them a cookbook with recipes from the The 2nd Infantry Division Bandread a story from Italy,” she said. by a different shape and containing eight countries. x is seeking vocalists. Applicants must have chain-of-command approval and an audition. Those Live, from interested should call 732-6695. Camp Casey... Winter Driving Safety Did you know … that when At Camp Casey in Dongducheon road conditions are RED, post Jan. 22, Lt. Col. Shawn Creamer shuttles and inter-post shuttles of the 2nd Infantry Division, that operate between the installations, and the Incheon (center, holding microphone) International Airport shuttle congratulates U.S. Vice President continue to run unless the Joseph Biden on his reelection service is temporarily suspended and that of President Obama to a by senior Army leaders? These second term. Creamer and 11 other contract bus drivers have U.S. and Korean servicemembers extensive professional driver spoke via satellite to Biden, who training and certification to safely was one of about 4,000 attendees operate a vehicle during adverse at the Commander-in-Chief Ball weather conditions. Senior Army in Washington, D.C. Millions of leaders will not permit anyone viewers saw the interviews on live to drive in road conditions that could potentially put drivers and television. – U.S. Army photo by their passengers in danger. Staff Sgt. Joshua Tverberg
  • USAG-Y • PAGE 7http://yongsan.korea.army.mil USAG YONGSAN THE MORNING CALMCYSS continues excellence with NAEYC accreditationBy Pfc. Jihoon Jungjihoon.jung.fm@mail.mil YONGSAN GARRISON -- U.S.Army Garrison Yongsan’s Child,Youth and School Services haveearned reaccreditation from theNational Association for theEducation of Young Children.The accreditation showcases theCYSS’ capability of supportingServicemembers, Families andCivilians with a quality child careconsistent in every field of theNAEYC inspection. Originally accredited in 2006,the Yongsan CYSS supportsreadiness and contributes tothe quality of life for the AreaII Community by providingappropriate care options forchildren and youth. The NAEYC accreditationprocess requires thoroughpreparation to meet programstandards, including curriculum,staff, nutrition, environment,and ongoing relationships withthe community. Claudette Mohn,the CYSS services coordinator, Claudette Mohn, CYSS services coordinator for USAG Yongsan’s Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, center,and her team received NAEYC receives the NAEYC Accreditation certificate presented by Col. Michael E. Masley, left, and Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel L. Willing, Jan.accreditation after an on-site 14. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Jung Jihoon)visit by NAEYC assessors “We are very excited about doing the right thing.” accreditation is regarded as our Servicemembers, Civiliansour accomplishment,” Mohn NAEYC, founded in 1926, is a a proof that the accredited and Families throughout thesaid. “As the premise for the civilian academic organization program is professional and garrison to get better child careaccreditation is to demonstrate that provides education for all efficient. service.”that the program meets the children from birth age to age “Our program will benefit the U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan’snational standards, CYSS has eight. Its goal is to organize a high Community because the NAEYC CYSS provides programs suchactually earned the accreditation quality system of early childhood accreditation will elevate the as; hourly child care programsby help of dedicated staff education. Also, NAEYC approves garrison’s assessment among the for both full and part day, beforemembers. Taking what we earned credit for qualified child care nation,” Mohn said. “In addition, and after school care programs,as a chance, we expect that the programs so that it can help all since everything we do to earn the middle school and teenaccreditation will show current people concerned in developing accreditation regards taking care programs, family child care, andand potential parents that we are continuous programs. NAEYC’s of children, our program will help school support services. xMilitary Police raises awareness of handicapped parking zonesBy Pfc. Lim Hongseo in a handicap space. Handicaphongseo.lim.fm@mail.mil plates or placards issued from a stateside DMV are not valid here YONGSAN GARRISON -- In in Area II.”order to make Yongsan more The vehicle registration sectionaccessible to the physically located in Camp Kim issues thehandicapped community, U.S. Forces Korea handicappedMilitary Police of U.S Army decal. The Brian Allgood ArmyGarrison Yongsan have put Community Hospital, Postextra efforts to raise awareness Exchange shops, Commissaryof handicapped parking zones and Moyer Recreation Centerregulations. are some of the places within Handicapped parking zones Area II that have designatedensure easier access to those handicapped parking zones.who have a verified permanent “The Brian Allgood Armyphysical disability. As approved Community Hospital is whereby a military physician, violations of handicap parkinghandicapped personnel may often occur,” Konerman said. “Asapply for a special handicap more and more Servicemembersdecal, which will be displayed and Families visit the hospital,on the inside of the driver’s front there is an overall lack of parkingwindshield of the vehicle. spaces, and people take up the “Handicap parking by those handicap zone instead. Peoplenot authorized is a problem here with legitimate need can’t usein Area II,” said Sgt. Thomas what they need to use.”If theA. Konerman, traffic accident regulation is violated, all vehiclesinvestigator for the 142nd other than the ones with properMilitary Police Company. “People USFK handicap decals willoccupying the handicapped receive parking citations.”parking zone without proper If you need to register for aauthorization are taking away USFK handicap decal, you mayspaces from those who really do so at the Vehicle Registration Spc. Robert S. Jones, Traffic Collision Investigator for 142nd Military Police Company, writes aneed them. It is important Office on Camp Kim. Please ticket to a vehicle violating the handicapped parking zones regulations in front of the 121st Combatto know that the registered contact DSN 724-4811 for further Support Hospital / Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital, Jan. 15. (U.S Army photo by Pfc. Limdecals authorize you to park information. x Hong Seo), Dec. 20. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Lee Hyokang)
  • January 25, 2013 USAG YONGSAN USAG-Y • PAGE 8 http://yongsan.korea.army.milNew water pumps at Yongsan save money News & Notes USAG Yongsan’s Official Website Check out what’s hot and stay in the know with information straight from the source. Visit and bookmark USAG Yongsan’s official website at http://yongsan. korea.army.mil and you’ll find the latest news, photos, and lots of other Community information. Heating Season Reminders As part of our energy conservation efforts, the garrison has installed timers/ programmable thermostats in our buildings. Administrative buildings are heated from 0600 to 1700 to a temperature of 68F. After duty hours the temperature is reduced to 55F to conserve energy. If you need assistance please call the Service Order desk, DSN 724-3360. Primary Care AppointmentUkun Chong, foreman of the Water and Waste Branch for U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan’s Directorate of Public Works, explains the positive Need a primary appointmentoutcomes of replacing the 40-year-old in-line pumps to a new cost effective pump, Jan. 23. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. Lee Hyokang) at the Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital?By Cpl. Hyokang Lee Public Works, through his sink hole which can lead to The USAMEDDAC-K Centralhyokang.lee.fm@mail.mil personal investigation, made an unfortunate accident from Appointment lines has changed a decision that the garrison subsurface erosion and cause the hours of operation. You may YONGSAN GARRISON, could be saving more money by a serious damage to the host now call between Monday-FridayRepublic of Korea -- U.S. implementing the new system nation main arterial,” said (0700-1800) to make a PRIMARYArmy Garrison Yongsan took at the wells even if they can Cobbs. CARE appointment . Just diala big step forward to save tax operate it for only few years. The cost to replace the DSN 737-CARE (2273).payers’ dollars by replacing The original pumps produced intake pumps at the Han Riverdeteriorated in-line pumps at water at an efficiency rate of well was $405,977. The work Telephone Prefix 05033the well water intake station to less than 20 percent per each was done through the Energy Replaces 0505brand new efficient pump. The pump, which indicated that Savings Contract Program by Telephone prefix 05033 nowgarrison expects to save over the pumps had passed their Johnson Controls. replaces telephone prefix 0505 as$1.3 million by not purchasing life cycle and needed to be This is one of many on-going of Dec. 1, 2012 on all U.S. ArmyCity Water. replaced. energy saving projects here in posts throughout South Korea USAG Yongsan relied on two “The garrison was using Yongsan garrison. By saving when dialing from a commercialsources of water: the primary on or about 40 percent city energy, Yongsan supports the telephone line into the Defensesource of water is the wells water and 60 percent well Department of the Defense’s Switch Network (DSN). Air Forceand the Seoul City Water as an water to service water to the budget. and Navy bases will not be affectedEmergency backup. However, community,” Cobbs said. “We “Now that we will realize by the prefix change. The newthe garrison depended more are now using 100 percent well a return on the investment prefix works by dialing 05033 andon the City Water because water and have ordered all city on or about 6 months from the last six digits of a DSN line.they constantly lost water water lines closed.” now as a result of the $1.3with the deteriorated pumps Economic matter was not million savings,” said Cobbs. 2013 PyeongChang Worldand the pumps couldn’t meet the only reason the project was “I have turned my attention Winter Gamesthe hydraulic needs of the planned. Cobbs also concerned to the wastewater system to The PyeongChang Specialcommunity. about the risk of losing water determine similar cost savings Olympics World Winter Games Calvin Cobbs, chief from the defected pipe and the were we can reduce the cost of will take place from Jan. 26of Plant Operations and possible outcome of it. wastewater charges paid to the to Feb. 8 when 3,000 athletesSanitation Branch for USAG “Losing water in the host nation.” x from 115 different countries willYongsan’s Directorate of pipeline may have caused compete in a variety of Olympic- type sports. The PyeongChang World Winter Games is intended to provide children and adults with intellectual disabilities the opportunity to compete and develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, and experience joy. Athletes will participate in 7 major events (alpine skiing, cross- country skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, speed skating, figure skating, and floor hockey). For more information about this event, visit http://www. specialolympics.org/Games/ PyeongChang_2013.aspx. For a complete list of community information news and notes, visit the USAG Yongsan official website at http://yongsan.korea.army.mail
  • PAGE 10www.army.mil/korea CHAPLAIN THE MORNING CALM Area I Worship Schedule Area II Worship Schedule Area III Worship Schedule Area IV Worship ScheduleCollective Protestant Liturgical Sunday 9:30 a.m. Memorial Chapel Collective Traditional DaeguSunday 11 a.m. Stanley Chapel Traditional Sunday 9:30 a.m. Brian Allgood Hospital Sunday 11 a.m. Freedom ChapelSunday 11 a.m. CRC Warrior Chapel Contemporary Sunday 9 a.m. South Post Chapel SundaySunday 4 p.m. Hovey Chapel Sunday 10:30 a.m. K-16 Chapel Spanish 1 p.m. Freedom Chapel General Protestant 9 a.m. Henry TheaterSunday 9:30 a.m. West Casey Chapel Sunday 11 a.m. Hannam Village Chapel Catholic Mass 10:30 a.m. Daegu High School Nondenominational Chapel Next 5 p.m. Freedom Chapel Gospel 11:30 a.m. Henry Theater Sunday 11 a.m. South Post Chapel Church of Christ 4:40 p.m. Walker Chapel AnnexLiturgical Protestant Gospel Sunday 1 p.m. South Post Chapel Korean Worship Wed 7 p.m. Freedom Chapel Contemporary 6 p.m. Walker Chapel OfficeSunday 11 a.m. Stone Chapel Korea Women Bible Study Tue, 9:30 a.m. Freedom Chapel Mision Pentecostal Hispana Tuesday Sunday 2:30 p.m. Hannam Village Chapel KATUSA Bible Study 6 p.m. Freedom Chapel KWBS 10:30 a.m. Walker Chapel AnnexGospel PWOC Bible Study Wed 6:30 p.m. Freedom Chapel KATUSA Service 6 p.m. Walker Chapel AnnexSunday 10:15 a.m. Memorial Chapel United Pentecostal Sunday 1 p.m. Memorial Chapel Spanish Bible Study Thur,7 p.m. Freedom Chapel Wednesday PWOC 10 a.m. Walker Chapel Annex Catholic MassCOGIC KATUSA Tuesday 6:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel LDS Youth 6:50 p.m. Walker Chapel Annex Sunday 9 a.m. Freedom ChapelSunday 12:30 p.m. CRC Warrior Chapel M, W, T, F 11:45 a.m. Freedom Chapel Seventh-Day Adventist Friday Saturday 9:30 a.m. Brian Allgood Hospital Youth Ministry 6:30 p.m. Walker Chapel Office Religious education Sun 10 a.m., Freedom ChapelKATUSA LDS 6:30 p.m. Walker Chapel Annex Tue 6 p.m.Sunday 7 p.m. CRC Warrior Chapel Episcopal Sunday 11 a.m. Brian Allgood HospitalTuesday 6:30 p.m. Stone Chapel MCCW 3rd Th 9:30 a.m. Freedom Chapel Camp Carroll Catholic Services PWOC Wed 9:30 a.m. Freedom Chapel Sunday Catholic Mass Saturday 5 p.m. Memorial Chapel PMOC 2nd Sat 8:30 a.m. Freedom Chapel General Protestant 10 a.m. Camp Carroll ChapelCatholic Services/Mass Sunday 8 a.m. Memorial Chapel Catholic Mass 11:40 a.m. Camp Carroll ChapelSunday 9 a.m. CRC Warrior Chapel Sunday 11:30 a.m. Memorial Chapel Youth of the Garrison Friday 6:30 p.m. CAC Rec AnnexSunday 11:30 a.m. West Casey Chapel M, W, T, F 11:45 a.m. Memorial Chapel Tuesday 1st Sat. 9 a.m. Memorial Chapel KATUSA Service 6 p.m. Camp Carroll Chapel Jewish Friday 7 p.m. South Post Chapel Latter-day Saints worship POC: daegubp@gmail.com Latter-day Saints worship POC: cphumphreysbp@gmail.com Latter-day Saints worship POC: northernbp@gmail.com Latter-day Saints worship POC: seoulbp@gmail.com Korea-wide Army chaplain points of contactArea I and USAG Red Cloud Chaplains Area II and USAG Yongsan Chaplains Area III and USAG Humphreys Chaplains Area IV and USAG Daegu ChaplainsChaplain (Lt. Col.) Suk Jong Lee: Chaplain (Maj.) Robert E. Marsi: Chaplain (Maj.) Ricky A. Way: Chaplain (Maj.) Charlie Leesukjong.lee@us.army.mil, 732-6169 robert.marsi@us.army.mil, 738-3009 ricky.a.way.mil@mail.mil 754-7274 sun.c.lee4.mil@mail.mil, 764-4192Chaplain (Maj.) Alfred Grondski: Chaplain (Maj.) Michael Frailey Chaplain (Capt.) Michael Roberts Chaplain (Maj.) Paul Wilbournalfred.grondski@us.army.mil, 732-6016 michael.l.frailey.mil@mail.mil, 738-3058 michael.r.roberts@us.army.mil, 754-7042 paul.d.wilbourn.mil@mail.mil, 764-5455 PAID ADVERTISING - HALF PAGE
  • PAGE 12www.army.mil/korea FEATURE THE MORNING CALM JANUARY 25, 2012 MORNING CALM PAGE 23 http://daegu.korea.army.mil 498th CSSB, 501st SBDE host 2013 Modern Army Combative Tournament at Camp CarrollStory and photos by Staff Sgt. Robert Dedeaux program,” said Micheal Herd, senior instructorrobert.dedeaux@us.army.mil at the 498th CSSB Modern Army Combatives Training School. In addition, we also wanted DAEGU GARRISON — The U.S. Forces Ko- to put this tournament together so we couldrea motto “Fight Tonight” took a literal meaning assemble a team to take to the ‘All Army Com-Saturday and Sunday as Soldiers from across the batives Tournament’ in Fort Carson later thisKorean Peninsula kicked, punched and pum- year.”meled their opponents into submission during The Army Combatives program has adapted PAID ADVERTISING - FULL PAGEthe “Unleash the Pen” 2013 Modern Army Com- to integrate the most current mixed martial artbatives Tournament at Camp Carroll, South Ko- techniques. Level 1 is now the Basic Combat-rea. ives Course, which now includes post, frame, The 498th Combat Sustainment Support hook, and employing secondary weapons (pis-Battalion, 501st Sustainment Brigade hosted tol or bayonet). Level 2 is the Tactical Combat-the tournament which consisted of double ives Course. Level 3 is the Basic Combativeselimination rounds for more than 40 competi- Instructor Course. Level 4 is the Tactical Com-tors in eight weight classes. batives Instructor Course. “We set up the Modern Army Combatives For more information on future tournamentsTournament to help Soldiers enjoy the pro- or to enroll in Basic Combatives Course visit thegram, to get some experience in the ring and 498th CSSB Combatives School House Facebooka chance to apply what they learned in our page or contact michael.k.herd.mil@mail.mil x
  • JANUARY 25, 2013 USAG HUMPHREYS USAG-H • PAGE 15 www.army.mil/korea News & Notes Former interns pursue careers at Camp Humphreys Reading Volunteers Needed By Victoria Choi Soldiers are needed to help be USAG Humphreys Public Affairs a positive influence on our next generation and share the power CAMP HUMPHREYS – When they of reading. Up to six Soldiers are first entered the U.S. Army Garrison needed each Friday to come, in Humphreys Intern Program, three uniform, to read aloud to Hum- current graduates had no idea that phreys American Elementary the experience would eventually lead School students. Participants them to working here. must have an approved ACS vol- The Humphreys program, which unteer packet, including back- ground check, before registering is part of the U.S. Forces Korea Good for reading times. Contact the Neighbor and Community Relations USO for more information, at Program, has been in operation for 753-6281. three years. Approximately 60 local Korean university students have had Pinewood Derby Set the opportunity to work in an Ameri- Lee, Hye-young, (right front) currently works as a child and youth program assistant at The Scouts will be participating can environment and experience the Humphreys Youth Center. About three years ago, she was beginning an internship in their Pinewood Derby in the American culture without having to in the Garrison Public Affairs Office, which she credits with helping her find employ- Youth Rec Annex (Bldg. 111), on travel to the United States. ment at camp Humphreys. – Courtesy photo Jan. 26, starting around 11:15 a.m. The interns contribute to the mis- teens and goes on field trips with them. Then, in June 2012, Yoo became tour Sign-ups begin at 10 a.m. Anyone sion by providing their voluntary ser- She said that she enjoys working with coordinator at USO Tours by Koridoor. can compete in the race. vices in garrison offices, where they children and youth and thinks that her Although he was offered another con- Cheonan Warship Tour get a chance to get familiar with a new internship experience helped her a lot tract position at Camp Kim, in Seoul, USO Tours is offering a Cheonan profession, learn new, useful, skills in adjusting to her job. he decided to come here because he re- Warship Security Tour. The tour and get to know more about the peo- “During the internship, I wrote ally missed Humphreys. leaves the USO on Jan. 26, at 9 ple at in the Humphreys community some articles about the child and Yoo had some U.S. Army friends a.m., and returns around 6 p.m. and themselves. For many of them, youth programs and events,” she said. when he was in college. He heard from The tour costs $55 for active duty the program became a life-altering ad- “So, I was familiar with my new work- those Soldiers that they were working military and Family members, venture. place. When I interviewed for my cur- during the week and just staying on and $60 for civilians. The fee in- When Kim, Hyeong-gyun, who rent job, I wasn’t nervous at all. Visit- post on weekends. He felt sorry for the cludes transportation, an English goes by the American name Neil, be- ing the many facilities and meeting a fact that his foreign friends didn’t use speaking guide and all entrance gan as an intern in 2010, he worked at lot of people during the internship was the opportunity to explore his country. fees. For more information, call 753-6248 or stop by the Hum- the Super Gym. Even at that time he very helpful to me.” “Korea is small, but there are many phreys USO. said, “I realized that the internship Another former intern, David Yoo, things to see,” said Yoo. “I help to coor- could be a turning point in my life.” can be found at the USO working for dinate and serve tours and I feel really TARP Training At Theater The internship program allowed Koridoor Tours. During his 2011 in- happy and satisfied with my job every The next Threat Awareness and Kim to experience “real” America, a ternship, he worked at in the Garrison time I get positive feedback from the Reporting Program (TARP) train- country he had never been to. Here, Plans, Analysis, and Integration Office. participants. I’m always looking for ing will be held Jan. 29, from 10-11 at Humphreys, he said he met “a lot of “My internship experience has great places and nice experiences to a.m. (English) and 11 a.m.-noon great people” and enjoyed the “abun- changed my life,” Yoo said. “In my 20’s, serve better tours for Soldiers, civilians (Hangul), in the Post Theater dant fast food.” After finishing his in- I saw and experienced a new world and families at Humphreys.” (Bldg. 113). TARP training is an ternship, Kim started working for the and society. My internship experience On Jan. 14, the internship pro- annual requirement and is held Camp Humphreys Army and Air Force at PAIO was great. I could learn many gram welcomed the seventh season quarterly. The next quarterly training will be April 25. Training Exchange Service and currently works things, much more than I expected. of interns. A total of 13 students from is open to all mission units and at the shoppette closest to Army Fam- I could learn (about) the American Namseoul and Pyeongtaek universities the Humphreys Community. For ily Housing. business culture, personal relation- have joined the Humphreys communi- more information, contact Doug Lee, Hye-young, who goes by the ships, customer service, marketing, ty for at least the next six months. Kim, Fraser at 754-6192. American name Judy, was the very first and the atmosphere of the installation Lee and Yoo are glad that the program intern of USAG Humphreys Public in general. I translated documents, keeps opening the installation for new First Time Home Buyer Affairs Office and she also decided to participated in important meetings interns, bringing the American and The ACS Financial Readiness Pro- connect her life’s work with the instal- and assisted in designing marketing Korean communities closer together. gram offers a “First Time Home lation after finishing her internship. tools for the ICE program. Working “I hope the interns learn many Buyer” class, on Jan. 29, from 1-2 Lee currently works as a child and with the ICE program was especially things and have the opportunity to get p.m., in the Family Readiness youth program assistant at the Hum- memorable. Through these many ex- a job here,” Lee said. “Do not hesitate Center (Bldg. 1127). For more in- formation, call 753-8403. For phreys Youth Center. In her position, periences I could evaluate myself and to accept a challenge while at Camp more information on ACS pro- she schedules monthly programs for think what I’d like to do for my future.” Humphreys.” x Entitlement survey completion helps paychecks grams, go to http://humphreys. korea.army.mil/ACS and look un- der Downloads. By Lt. Col. Anthony Cole the COLA survey. The data collected to complete. The surveys can be ac- Money and Moving Director, 175th FMSC will assist in the determination of the cessed from the 175th Financial Man- The ACS Financial Readiness Pro- amount of COLA paid to service mem- agement Support Center (FMSC) gram offers a “Money and Mov- CAMP HUMPHREYS – During the bers in Korea. Facebook page, http://www.facebook. ing” class for first term Soldiers, on Jan. 30, from 1-2 p.m., in the upcoming months, the Defense Trav- The OHA Survey tracks utilities com/pages/175th-Financial-Man- Family Readiness Center (Bldg. el Management Office (DTMO) will and recurring maintenance expenses agement-Support-Center-Official- 1127). For more information, call conduct two important entitlement incurred by our service members and Site/328065913301 or the Defense Trav- 753-8403. surveys for those stationed in Korea: their families living in privately leased el Management Office website, http:// the Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) housing while stationed overseas. Ser- www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/lps- BOSS Japan Cruise survey, from Feb. 15-March 15, and the vice members who reside off post and korea.cfm. The surveys will not be Feb. 1 is the deadline day for the Overseas Housing Allowance (OHA) have received OHA for more than six available until the stated time frames BOSS Japan Cruise, scheduled for Utilities survey, from April 1-30. months are authorized to take the listed above. The goal is 100 percent Feb. 14-18 (five days, four nights). The COLA survey tracks the shop- OHA Utility survey. The purpose of contact. Transportation, hotel, breakfast ping patterns of Uniformed Service collecting this data is to assist in the Maximum participation in these and more is covered under the Members stationed overseas who formulation of OHA paid to service surveys are encouraged because $890 price. For more information, contact Humphreys BOSS at 753- have family members at overseas loca- members. DTMO uses their data to update the 8970 or 753-8825. tions. All service members who have The surveys are online question- amount of COLA and OHA entitle- been stationed in Korea for more than naires that may be taken from home ments for Soldiers, sailors, airmen, and three months are encouraged to take or work and take about 30 minutes Marines. x
  • PAGE 16www.army.mil/korea USAG HUMPHREYS THE MORNING CALM The Kimchicks try to block the ROKettes jammer from getting through. – Courtesy photo by Matt Audet The Kimchicks are: Gholdie Knocks, BuZzed Lightyear, HurriCaylen, Punker BruiseH- er, Shudder Speed, Snowstorm, Deviant Ingredient, Bruise Lee, Mobsta and Cherry BombHER. – Courtesy photo by Cary Collins The ROKettes are: Manik Panik, Keiki o ka Ainokea, FoXy L’Amour, Black Magik, KarenRockettes jammer, Ginger Sniper, gets ready to score some points for her team. – A. Grudge, Hellbows, Dirti Rott’n App!eteeni, Lynch Mob, Toxic Intention and GingerCourtesy photo by Matt Audet Sniper. – Courtesy photo by Megan WadeRoller Derby ‘revival’ comes to HumphreysBy Kendra Moore Osan Humphreys team soon. “I think the women take some rough knocks, teach them how to fall and fall prop-USAG Humphreys Public Affairs Office it’s interesting to see women battle it hits, and smacks to the ground. erly, so you can get right back up and out with roller skates on.” Tania Fricke, known as FoXy do the job you need to do.” CAMP HUMPHREYS – “Get her, Spruced up with knee pads, elbow L’Amour said, “It feels great to be head- Sumja said that the crowd turnoutMom,” yelled out Kaya Black, 11, as protection and hard-hats, the ladies ing into my 40’s and still taking out was awesome. “We had such amazingshe passionately watched her mother, were rough and rolling, smashing into chicks half my age.” support from the community. It’s beenBilly, and the other ladies battle it out each other and knocking over oppo- The coach of the team is Rachel overwhelming.”on the Youth Annex gym floor for the nents in high hopes of winning the Sumja, who has been doing roller der- “Without the fans, it is just prac-Osan Humphreys Rollergirls Roller game. Even with all of that protective by since 2005 and started a league in tice,” Wheeler said.Derby team, Jan. 13, during a bout gear, bumps and bruises could not be North Carolina in 2006. “It’s very entertaining,” said Masterbetween the Kimchicks and the RO- avoided. “I was trying to get together a con- Sgt. Bobby Jones, who was there sup-Kettes, bringing a new definition to “This is an awesome, stress-reliev- tact sport for women,” she said. Then porting one of his airman. “I’ve neverthe expression “Rock ‘n Roll.” ing sport,” said Dorothy Wheeler, a she started the Osan Humphreys team been to a bout, but you can tell they Although the sport of roller derby is senior airman who goes by the name in October 2011, practicing at Osan Air have a lot of passion in what they arestill relatively new to Korea, the origins ToXic InTention. “The best part about Base on a basketball court in the rain, doing.”date back to the late 1940’s. The sport this sport is that we are all friends… un- heat and cold. Participation with the Osan Hum-is played between two teams of five til the whistle blows. “She took a bunch of desperate phreys Roller Derby is open to allmembers skating on a circuit track. “The adrenaline rush of this sport housewives and made us fierce,” Fricke women, whether active duty, civilians,Each team designates a scoring player, is very intense,” Wheeler added. “I said. or family members. The next Osancalled a “jammer,” with the others be- look forward to this every Sunday. It’s It looks like all of their hard work Humphreys Roller Derby event willing “blockers.” The most recent revival all about endurance and strength, es- has started to pay off. There are about be held in the Super Gym, Feb. 16, atof the sport began in early 2000, in pecially for the blockers, because not 20 players now, both active duty mili- 7 p.m. Anyone interested in joining ei-Austin, Texas. Today, there are more only do you have to hit her, but you tary and family members, and during ther as a player, volunteer, or referee,than 1,200 amateur leagues worldwide. have to lift her up and take her out.” this event, they had six new players. should message them on their Face- “I love the sport,” said Wendolyn This is not a sport for the tender- Sumja said even though there was a book page at: www.facebook.com/Simmons, who hopes to be on the hearted. During the course of a bout, lot to work on, “they did amazing. We OsanRollerDerbyFanx
  • USAG-H • PAGE 18www.army.mil/korea USAG HUMPHREYS THE MORNING CALMWestphal voices support for U.S. troops in KoreaBy Walter Ham IV military personnel on the peninsula.Eighth Army Public Affairs As budgets tighten in the years ahead, Westphal said the U.S. Army YONGSAN GARRISON – The U.S. will continue to prioritize its combatArmy’s second highest civilian official forces, wounded warriors and Armyvoiced his support for U.S. Soldiers, ci- families.vilian employees and families serving “We want no compromise there,” hein Korea during a recent visit. said. Under Secretary of the U.S. Army On Yongsan Garrison, the EighthJoseph W. Westphal visited the Korean Army commanding general briefedPeninsula Jan. 15-17, as a part of a week- Westphal on Eighth Army’s revolu-long trip to the Asia Pacific region. tionary mission change from an Army Following a stop in Hawaii, West- Service Component Command to anphal arrived in South Korea to meet operational Field Army headquarters,with senior military leaders and Sol- capable of commanding multinationaldiers on Yongsan Garrison and Camp corps-level combat formations.Humphreys, the current and future While at Humphreys, Westphal ateheadquarters posts for U.S. Forces in lunch with Soldiers at the 194th Com-South Korea. bat Sustainment Support Battalion’s Prior to his tour, Westphal said he is Provider Grill Dining Facility; receivedparticularly looking forward to visiting briefings on the Humphreys Transfor-Camp Humphreys for the first time. mation; and visited the newly built “While I’ve never been there, I Under Secretary of the U.S. Army Joseph W. Westphal makes a point while dining with Army Family Housing units and somethink I know Humphreys better than Soldiers at the Provider Grill, Jan. 17. – U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jamel Carry off-post apartments.I know my backyard ... just from all of The U.S. Army’s senior leaders havethe presentations that I’ve had back in partnership this has become,” said Korean War hero; and Eighth Army all recently visited the Korean Penin-Washington about it,” said Westphal. Westphal, adding that the anniversary Commanding General Lt. Gen. John D. sula and sang the praises of American As the U.S. Army winds down its shows how far South Korea has come Johnson. troops serving close to the world’sinvolvement in Afghanistan, Westphal in 60 years -- from a nation devastat- Westphal said he is impressed with most heavily armed border.said Army units will be increasingly fo- ed by a brutal war “to one of the most the readiness of American forces in Westphal echoed their sentiments.cused on maintaining stability in the vibrant economies in the world…to a Korea and the dedication of the senior “More and more, this assignment isAsia Pacific region. country of tremendous possibility and U.S. Army leadership team on the pen- incredibly important to our national Westphal noted that the Republic potential.” insula, which he called one of the best security,” said Westphal. “This is at theof Korea-United States Alliance will During his visit, Westphal met leadership teams in the U.S. Army. heart of one of the most strategicallymark the 60th anniversary this July of with Gen. James D. Thurman, com- “I’m trying to make sure that I can important places in the world.the Korean War Armistice agreement mander of United Nations Command, also be a voice for our alliance in Wash- “If I was a young guy thinking aboutthat brought a tenuous ceasefire to the Combined Forces Command and U.S. ington in terms of readiness,” said my future, I would think seriouslyKorean Peninsula. Forces Korea; retired Republic of Ko- Westphal. about, ‘Hey, I want to join the Army “The 60th anniversary gives us a rea Army Gen. Paik Sun-yup, the ROK The under secretary said he was fo- and go to Korea and see what that’schance to show what an incredible Army’s first four-star general and a cused on every issue that affects U.S. like,’” said Westphal. x
  • PAGE 20http://daegu.korea.army.mil MORNING CALM THE MORNING CALM JANUARY 25, 2013 USAG DAEGU USAG Daegu • PAGE 21 http://daegu.korea.army.mil Soldiers get a kick out of Combatives Tournament Story and photos by Lee, Seung-bin NCOIC. "Benefits of the program are it.” maintain physical fitness. The MAC seungbin.lee@us.army.mil vast. From the obvious of being able to “The MAC Program reflects big Army competition is a challenge for us. We defend yourself if the situation presents by instilling Warrior Ethos in its Sol- just take our own time and dedicate DAEGU GARRISON — The Camp it’s self, to the workout aspect. The diers, applying the seven Army Val- ourselves to being better as a team, a Carroll Fitness Center set the stage for program is an awesome way to get in ues and teaching hand-to-hand and coach and good mentors.” the 2013 Modern Army Combatives shape and stay in shape. The program close quarter combat, said Herd. "Be- Herd emphasized the importance of (MAC) Tournament held over the Mar- instills the Army Values every day and I ing that we are currently the Army at safety. “Safety is always our number one tin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend. believe assists in producing some of the war we must ensure that every Soldier concern – ensuring that each Soldier Hundreds of Soldiers, Family members best Soldiers in the Army.” is equipped not only with the proper gets the best possible training within a and friends attended the widely antici- If you think mixed martial arts is pri- weaponry and ammunition but with controlled environment.”x pated competition that kicked off Jan. marily a male-dominated sport, one the ability to defend oneself if that 18 with a weigh-in of participants. A participant in the tournament would equipment happens to malfunction. It total of 53 competitors from across the say you are wrong. is to ensure that every Soldier no mat- peninsula formed teams to compete in "I am a brand new in the Army," ter MOS or duty position is able to close the three-day tournament, that tested Pvt. Megan Frezee, 1st Brigade Special with and destroy the enemy, while still the combative skills, agility and endur- Troops Battalion, 4th Chemical Com- displaying the Warrior Ethos and the ance of Soldiers "fit to fight." The 498th pany, Camp Hovey said. "I only had one seven Army Values.” CSSB Combatives School on Camp Car- class before coming to the competition. “As a Soldier, hand-to-hand combat roll played an integral role in getting the However, I participated because I like training is a very necessary part of self tournament off the ground. to fight and I wanted to show that we defense on the battlefield,” said the “Our mission is to train officers, are tough. winner of the heavyweight category, Soldiers, and KATUSAs on the Mod- “Hand-to-Hand combat can be fun. It Staff Sgt. Chan Tea Soeung, 304th Ex- ern Army Combatives Program basic is not about violence. I hope more fe- peditionary Signal Battalion, 1st Signal hand-to-hand combat skills," said Sgt. male Soldiers participate in the compe- Brigade, Camp Humphreys. “Physical Michael Herd, 498th CSSB Combatives tition next time. I think they will enjoy training is the best way to train and PAID ADVERTISING - FULL PAGE 501st SBDE KATUSAs volunteer time and energy to Elite Child Center Story by Lee, Seung-bin An interesting and unique story from seungbin.lee@us.army.mil this center is that the students from the Elite Child Center are actually very good DAEGU GARRISON — A broadcast in school on average, especially in Eng- documentary team from Seoul’s SBS lish. broadcast network traveled to Camp “The KATUSAs from 501st SBDE visit Carroll Jan. 16 to begin production of the center every Wednesday and spend a feature that will highlight 501st Sus- almost two hours focusing on English tainment Brigade KATUSAs volunteer- studies,: said Park, Woo Jeong, chief of ing at the Waegwan Elite Community the Elite Community Center. "It’s not Center as English instructors. easy for the kids from the center to get “There are so many Local Child Care quality or expensive private education. Centers in Korea that operate under Because of this, the friendship/alliance poor conditions, with education and with the 501st is the only way that the finance being among their greatest kids have a chance to not only receive needs,” said Lee, Jong-jin, production quality tutoring, but have fun while director, SBS broadcast television. “We they learn. The KATUSAs play a vital want to inform viewers of these poor role as teachers, and as mentors.” preparing for the English Speech Com- English Camp, received an award dur- conditions, and to do that we plan to “It took time for the students and I to petition as a team enabled us to become ing an English Speech Contest held at visit various centers in Korea every two get to know each other, said Pfc. Lee, close. Although this is a volunteering U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan. As a re- weeks.” Seung-jun, 501st SBDE. "Studying and effort, it’s worthwhile to share my time sult, the young student traveled to the and knowledge with the students. I feel United States for the very first time especially worthwhile when I see my and, while there, had an opportunity to students start to dream and have hope meet Ban, Ki -moon, Secretary-General for their future and their lives.” of the United Nations. That once-in-a- “This is not simply about volunteer- lifetime experience led to her dream of ing, but it’s about how we can con- someday becoming the UN Secretary cerned we are about teaching effective- General. ly, and finding ways for the students to “I really appreciate all the help and have fun while they learn the English support from the U.S. Army, the ROK language,” said Pfc. Seo, Il Won, anoth- Army and KATUSAs," Park said. "Most er instructor from the 501st SBDE. of the children, given their under- For one of the students, the help from privileged surroundings, couldn’t have the 501st KATUSAs has really paid off. dreamed of a better future. Thanks to Recently Jo Eun-bi, who couldn’t have the support from the 501st SBDE, the learned English without the help of KA- KATUSAs have brought a lot of hope TUSAs supporting the Good Neighbor and love to our kids.”x (Top) (from left to right) Lee, Jong-jin, SBS Production Director, Jo, Eun-bi, Pfc. Lee, Seung- jun, 501st SBDE and Jeong, Ji-su smile during filming at the Elite Community Center.—U.S. Army photo by Lee, Seung-bin (Bottom) Pfc. Lee, Seung-jun, 501st SBDE answers a question for SBS Production Director Lee, Jong-jin. — U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Robert DeDeaux
  • USAG Daegu • PAGE 22http://daegu.korea.army.mil USAG DAEGU THE MORNING CALM JANUARY 25, 2012 MORNING CALM PAGE 23 http://daegu.korea.army.milApsan Global English Camp a Good Neighbor opportunityStory and Photos by Cpl. Jeong, Hyuk-soo tive and important part of the commu- Global English Camp said, “Visiting abroad I can get to know a new thing,hyuksoo.jeong@us.army.mil nity since 2007. Currently, eight mid- the U.S. Army base is a great opportu- and I wish I could come again.” dle schools located in Daegu’s Nam-Gu nity for all the students. It is a global The English Camp director is not the DAEGU GARRISON — For every district participate in the program. world and this type of program gives only one who alone who appreciatesmonth in the year excluding March So far this month, 33 students from students the necessary motivation the English program. U.S. Soldiers,and August, the Apsan Global Eng- Shim-in, and Kyongsang Middle School needed to experience a new culture. and KATUSAs from across USAG Dae-lish Camp takes place inside the Camp have visited Camp Walker and Henry. Every time I see the students enjoy- gu also seem to enjoy the opportunityWalker Army installation. The “Good While visiting the installation during ing and using the English they have interact with the students. “During myNeighbor” event is conducted by Sol- English Camp they have had opportu- learned, I feel proud of what I do and it Army life it makes me proud that I candiers and KATUSAs in support of this nities to speak with U.S. Soldiers and makes everything worthwhile.” help somebody else. The English Campfriendship-alliance program. It gives other Americans. Their visits have al- A second year middle school student will help the students overcome theirarea Korean students an opportunity lowed them opportunities to tour the Lee, Jung-woo from Shim-in Middle fear of speaking English. Being able toto visit the U.S. installation and ex- Camp Walker Commissary, the Com- School said he’s enjoying the program. get closer with them by doing many ac-perience a variety of things about the munity Activity Center, the Exchange, He added, “The English camp is a great tivities together, which creates a strongAmerican Culture. U.S. Army officials and the DFAC eating facilities. chance to experience about America bond, is something that I believe is im-said the English camp has been an ac- An, Dae-gyu, Director of Apsan and its culture. Without having to go portant,” aid Pfc. Lee, Hyung-ju.x PAID ADVERTISING - FULL PAGEA student poses a question about American culture to Staff Sgt. Yolanda Shy, HHC, USAG Cpl. Choi, Ko-nam, (standing), HHC, USAG Daegu, looks on as a student responds to aDaegu, during an English Camp learning session at the Camp Walker Community Activities scenario presented during the English Camp learning session held Jan. 16, on CampCenter, Jan. 16. On the left, Pfc. Lee, Hyung-gu, also from HHC, takes a question from Walker. The English Camp is held monthly and provides U.S. Soldiers and KATUSAs ananother student participant. opportunity to do their part in supporting the USAG Daegu Good Neighbor Program. HS/MS Design Charrette Make flipping your switch count and conserve energy Story by Mary Grimes these types of appliances should not USAG Daegu Public Affairs be plugged into an extension cord. Major appliances (refrigerators, DAEGU GARRISON — Electrical dryers, washers, microwaves, heat- power in movement generates heat, ers, etc.) must be plugged directly and the more you move, the more into a wall outlet. Extension cords heat you generate. Flip the switch, and power strips must not be used. plug it in, punch the “on” button, re- Cold weather tends to bring out gardless of how you do it, when you the use of more heat…and an incli- conserve energy, you are energizing nation to connect more extension your life. cords. According to fire officials, in the “Especially important this time United States, more than a billion of year, check electrical cords to dollars in loss and damages can be make sure they are not running attributed to fires in homes that were across doorways or under carpets," caused by electrical issues. That’s said Daegu Fire Chief Andrew M. just in home fires alone. This repre- Allen."Extension cords are intended sents just a little less than what was for temporary use. Take a closer look U.S. Army Garrison lost due to cooking fires, but more at how you are using the provided Daegu Commander Col. than candles. outlets and if needed, rearrange the Kathleen Gavle received How can you help prevent an elec- equipment to use the outlets you an outbrief Wednesday trical fire? have. Don’t add extension cords to at the completion of Start by saving electricity. Turn fix a problem, they only amplify your a design charette for off the power when it’s not needed. problem.” the new Middle/High Transformers are a common thing Another way to conserve energy is School which will be to have in off post housing here in by using light bulbs that match or are built on Camp Walker. A U.S. Army Garrison Daegu and Area lower than the wattage on the lamp design charette allows IV. Turn off transformers, computer or fixture. There should be a sticker monitors, copiers and anything else that indicates the maximum wattage multiple groups to have you when they are not in use, or light bulb to use. input into the design you may be leaving the immediate “Just adhering to these informa- features of, in this case, area for a period of time. Taking this tion tips can make a big difference future construction. - small step, stops heat loss and saves toward efforts to conserve energy," U.S. Army Photos by Cpl. money. explained Allen. "They will also Jeong, Hyuk-soo Only plug one heat-producing ap- prevent fires, and save the Garrison pliance into an outlet at a time. Also, huge costs as well.”x