William Wolmer: Rural development and Livestock : Trends, Challenges and Opportunities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

William Wolmer: Rural development and Livestock : Trends, Challenges and Opportunities

on

  • 5,504 views

A presentation given by William Wolmer at a workshop in Botswana in November 2008. The presentation explores achieving compatibility between the Transfrontier Conservation Area concept and ...

A presentation given by William Wolmer at a workshop in Botswana in November 2008. The presentation explores achieving compatibility between the Transfrontier Conservation Area concept and international standards for the management of Transboundary Animal Diseases. This is part of our Veterinary Science, Transboundary Animal Diseases and Markets project. Find out more at: http://www.steps-centre.org/ourresearch/vetscience.html

Statistics

Views

Total Views
5,504
Views on SlideShare
5,481
Embed Views
23

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
87
Comments
0

3 Embeds 23

http://stepscentre-thecrossing.blogspot.com 14
http://stepscentre-thecrossing.blogspot.co.uk 5
http://www.slideshare.net 4

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

William Wolmer: Rural development and Livestock : Trends, Challenges and Opportunities William Wolmer: Rural development and Livestock : Trends, Challenges and Opportunities Presentation Transcript

  • RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LIVESTOCK : TRENDS, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES ACHIEVING COMPATIBILITY BETWEEN THE TRANSFRONTIER CONSERVATION AREA CONCEPT AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF TRANSBOUNDARY ANIMAL DISEASES KASANE, BOTSWANA, 11-14 NOVEMBER 2008 William Wolmer (wwolmer@f2s.com)
  • Outline
    • Livestock and livelihoods
    • Transboundary animal diseases – what’s the problem for smallholders?
    • The livestock revolution
    • Beef, smallholders and wildlife in SADC region
    • New contexts for beef production – good and bad news
    • Marketing/disease control scenarios
    • TFCAs – opportunities and threats
  • Livestock and livelihoods
    • WDR 2008: most rural households and 40% of poorest households own livestock
    • Food, milk, draught power, manure, transport, clothing, ut-ensils, fuel, social safety nets, cultural resources and means of saving – red meat trade not main focus
    • Closely correlated to crop production
    • Livestock (not only cattle) important to diff people (men/women; wealthy/poor) at diff stages in demographic cycle
    • Complex sharing and loaning systems exist
  • FMD: same disease, different response Source: DEFRA, UK and Dr Peter Roeder, FAO, Rome
  • Why the overreaction?
  • Livestock Revolution
    • Rising affluence, particularly in Asia, brings growing global demand for milk, meat and other livestock products
    • Livestock sector in developing world growing at 7% p.a. Milk and meat production to double by 2050 (FAO)
    • African Union: livestock is a ‘sunrise sector’ – livestock a route out of poverty through access to high-value export markets (see African horticultural experience)
    • But, African countries: 2% of global trade in livestock products. Africa imports US$2.2billion/year more livestock products than exports
  • EU imports of beef and live animals 2007 Source: DG AGRI, European Commission 31.10.08
  • SADC: Competing or complementary sectors? Smallholder agropastoralism Commercial beef production Wildlife and tourism
    • Dualistic systems
    • Fences and zones
  • At the interface... Farmers Weekly UK 31.10.08 Elephants damage crops and veterinary fence, Zimbabwe. (Courtesy IUCN-ROSA)
  • SADC: Competing or complementary sectors? Smallholder agropastoralism Commercial beef production Wildlife and tourism
  • New contexts for beef production – the bad news:
    • Rising costs of compliance with product quality and food safety standards
    • Demise of ACP preferential agreements - EPAs
    • South American competition – low cost, high yielding, less daunting veterinary challenges (no buffalo)
    • Emergence of large multiple retailers with private standards regimes
    • Capacity of veterinary services
  • ... But its not all bad:
    • New markets – Asia, Middle East, Russia
    • Multiple retailers – opportunities for value-added branding and farm assurance schemes (‘green’ or ‘ethical’ certification)
    • Regional, urban, local market opportunities
    • New ideas for appropriate disease control gaining ground (FMD freedom with vaccination; compartmentalisation; commodity-based trade)
  •  
  • TFCAs – some personal reflections
    • Paradigm shift in conservation – beyond the reserves to the ‘lived-in’ landscape. Barriers to corridors.
    • Potential to provide further livelihood opportunities for some although extensive wildlife management remains unsuited to smallholder mixed farming systems (other than as joint ventures)
    • But how much further employment will tourism generate? A fickle industry in context of global economic downturn
    • Must provide sufficient incentives to accommodate wildlife costs (as with EU environmental stewardship experience)
    • Open borders for local populations as well as tourists and animals?
    • TFCAs could sit comfortably alongside many of the new beef marketing and disease control scenarios outlined
  • Conclusions
    • Goal: (high return), resilient and safe livestock production and marketing systems alongside vibrant tourism sector – biosphere that sustains full ecological functions and retains its living diversity
    • Approaches not reliant on area-based disease freedom open up the potential for greater market participation by poorer producers and offer degree of compatibility with transfrontier conservation
    • Not either/or – need combination of options; no ‘one-size-fits-all’ solution
    • Build resilience