S12j prague on civil society innovation

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  • Abstract Responsibility, Accountability and Enablement in Civil Society Engagements with the Direction of Innovation   This paper will start by examining mainstream European policy debates around 'knowledge society', 'innovation union', 'public engagement' and 'responsible innovation'. It will argue that these should not be taken at face value. Though some opportunities are presented for progressive 'opening up' of the politics of science and technology, there are also countervailing forces. Indeed (in areas like health, energy, materials and 'security'), many such policy initiatives are better understood as means by which powerful incumbent interests secure instrumental legitimation of favoured directions for innovation.   It will be shown how - despite interesting developments - conventional academic innovation studies systematically neglects the diverse impacts of civil society in 'innovation governance'. It will explore similar neglect of the crucial roles for democratic politics in studies of 'transitions to sustainability'. At root, lies the lack of any healthy critical political discourse about the general property of 'direction' in innovation (and social progress more widely). Altho 'linear models' are frequently disavowed, 'one track race' (indiscriminately 'science based', 'pro-innovation') rhetorics continue to thrive. Yet innovation - of all kinds - is actually known to be a complex, distributed, networked, relational process. So, the importance should be clear of institutions, discourses, practices (and methods of appraisal) that address the crucial property of 'direction'.   Far from being in tension with underlying 'Enlightenment' notions of scientific and social progress, it will be argued that recognition of this point is, ironically, actually entirely consistent with this mainstream theme in high level European political culture. But the implications are potentially very radical. The paper will end by exploring some of these implications for 'opening up' notions of responsibility and accountability towards a more democratic European politics of science, technology and innovation. In this task of 'pluralising progress', the diverse, contending roles of civil society become recognised as central. In short, this agenda is about moving beyond mere 'enlightenment' concerning the simple possibility of social advance, towards the enablement of more plural directions for real social progress.
  • Johnson and Lundvall, 2000. Promoting innovation systems as a response to the globalising learning economy http://www.druid.dk/uploads/tx_picturedb/ds2000-106.pdf Cooke P, Uranga M G, Etxebarria G, 1998, "Regional systems of innovation: an evolutionary perspective" Environment and Planning A 30(9) 1563 – 1584 Henry Etzkowitza, José Manoel Carvalho de Mellob, Mariza Almeidac, Towards “meta-innovation” in Brazil: The evolution of the incubator and the emergence of a triple helix, Research Policy Volume 34, Issue 4, May 2005, Pages 411-424 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V77-4FR8PHN-1&_user=128860&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1033972868&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000010638&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=128860&md5=9f4aa99c8023150dbde4bf839a35ec5c also: Loet Leydesdorff, Henry Etzkowitz , The Transformation Of University-industry-government Relations, Electronic Journal of Sociology (2001) http://sociology.org/content/vol005.004/th.html Henry Etzkowitza, José Manoel Carvalho de Mellob, Mariza Almeidac, Towards “meta-innovation” in Brazil: The evolution of the incubator and the emergence of a triple helix, Research Policy Volume 34, Issue 4, May 2005, Pages 411-424 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V77-4FR8PHN-1&_user=128860&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1033972868&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000010638&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=128860&md5=9f4aa99c8023150dbde4bf839a35ec5c also: Loet Leydesdorff, Henry Etzkowitz , The Transformation Of University-industry-government Relations, Electronic Journal of Sociology (2001) http://sociology.org/content/vol005.004/th.html J. Rogers Hollingsworth, Robert Boyer (eds) Contemporary capitalism: the embeddedness of institutions, Cambridge, 1997 Johan Schot, The contested rise of a modernist technology politics. In Technology and modernity, eds. Th.J. Misa, P. Brey and A. Rip, 257–78. Cambridge: MIT Press.2003 Grin, J. 2006. Reflexive modernisation as a governance issue, or: designing and shaping re-structuration. In Reflexive governance for sustainable development, eds. J.-P. Voss, D. Bauknecht and R. Kemp, 57–81. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.2006 Johan Schot∗ and FrankW. Geels, Strategic niche management and sustainable innovation journeys: theory, findings, research agenda, and policy, Technology Analysis & Strategic Management Vol. 20, No. 5, September 2008, 537–554 Lundvall and Lorenz, Innovation and Democracy in the Learning Economy: the new deal as response to the crisis, memorandum for No.10 policy seminar, October 2009
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
  • Pressure on regime: destabilise it; force incumbents to invest in alternative solutions to the newly pressurised problems
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  • S12j prague on civil society innovation

    1. 1. PLURALISING PROGRESS?Civil Society and the Direction of Innovation Keynote presentation to conference on Science and the Public in Decision-Making Processes, Prague, 25th October 2012 Andy Stirling SPRU & STEPS Centre
    2. 2. Mainstream Innovation Policy“you can’t stop progress” … - The Economist PROGRESS“well restore science to its rightful place”… ` - President Obama“Our hope … relies on scientific andtechnological progress” - Premier Wen Jiabao“One can not impede scientific progress.” - President Ahmadinejad TECHNOLOGYall innovation is progress… Lisbon Strategy for: “pro-innovation action” - EU Council of Ministers “we need more pro-innovation policies” - PM Gordon Brown “… the Government’s strategy is … SCIENCE pro-innovation” - PM David Cameron
    3. 3. The One-Track, Hard-Wired Innovation Race PROGRESS TECHNOLOGYLord Alec Broers, President, RAEng The challenge of government: …“history is a race to “to strive to stay advance technology” in the race”…Technology: The role of the public: “will determine the future “to give technology of the human race’” the status it deserves”…
    4. 4. Conventional Innovation Policy PROGRESS TECHNOLOGYTreats innovation as homogeneous: no distinctions … noalternatives… no politics … no choice!
    5. 5. Conventional Innovation Policy PROGRESS TECHNOLOGYTreats innovation as homogeneous: no distinctions … no alternatives … no politics … no choice !Scope for debate restricted to: yes or no? … how much? how fast? … who leads?
    6. 6. Conventional Innovation Policy PROGRESS TECHNOLOGYTreats innovation as homogeneous: no distinctions … no alternatives … no politics … no choice !Scope for debate restricted to: yes or no? … how much? how fast?’ … who leads?Seriously neglects questions over: which way? …what alternatives? says who? …why?
    7. 7. The Sustainability Transition? PRESUMED SINGULAR TRANSITION SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCETreats innovation as homogeneous: no distinctions … no alternatives … no politics … no choice !Scope for debate restricted to: yes or no? … how much? how fast?’ … who leads?Seriously neglects questions over: which way? …what alternatives? says who? …why?
    8. 8. Innovation as Branching Social PathwaysConstituted by institutions, practices, discourses, imaginations…For instance... “sustainable energy”knowledges of many kinds … as well as science and technologyBUT: not all that is conceivable, feasible, viable – will be fully realisable
    9. 9. Innovation as Branching Social PathwaysIntended and unintended processes and power ‘close down’ pathwayssocial shaping (Bijker, 85) co-construction (Misa, 03)studies: expectations (Brown, 03) imaginations (Jasanoff, 05)
    10. 10. Innovation as Branching Social PathwaysIntended and unintended processes and power ‘close down’ pathwayshistory: contingency (Mokyr, 92) momentum (Hughes 83) path-dependence (David, 85) path creation(Karnoe, 01)
    11. 11. Innovation as Branching Social PathwaysIntended and unintended processes and power ‘close down’ pathwaysphilosophy: autonomy (Winner, 77) closure (Feenberg, 91)/politics entrapment (Walker, 01) alignment (Geels, 02)
    12. 12. Innovation as Branching Social PathwaysIntended and unintended processes and power ‘close down’ pathwayseconomics: homeostasis (Sahal, 85) lock-in (Arthur, 89) regimes (Nelson & Winter, 77) trajectories (Dosi,82)
    13. 13. Civil Society Sustains Excluded PathwaysRelative freedom from market and state structures retains diversityvalues, visions, knowledges, interests, practices, lifestyles, behaviours…
    14. 14. Policy Knowledge as ‘Sound Science’ on public health: “… sound science…science-based decisions” - UN WHO DG Margaret Chan on genetic modification: “… this governments approach is to make decisions … on the basis of sound science” - former UK Prime Minister, Tony Blair on chemicals: “ …sound science will be the basis of the Commissions legislative proposal…” - EC RTD Commissioner, Philippe Busquin on energy: “[n]ow is the right time for a cool-headed, evidence based assessment … I want to sweep away historic prejudice and put in its place evidence and science” former UK Energy Minister Malcolm Wicks Justification: from political ‘problems’ to technical ‘puzzles’
    15. 15. Hidden Ambiguities in ‘Sound Science’Energy technologies: mature, sophisticated comparative analysis…
    16. 16. Hidden Ambiguities in ‘Sound Science’Energy technologies: mature, sophisticated comparative analysis…coaloilgasnuclearhydrowindsolarbiomass 0.001 0.1 10 1000 low RISK high externality’: cUS/kWh (after Sundqvist et al, 2005)
    17. 17. Hidden Ambiguities in ‘Sound Science’Energy technologies: mature, sophisticated comparative analysis… n=coaloilgas minimum 25% 75% maximumnuclear 21hydrowindsolarbiomass 0.001 0.1 10 1000 low RISK high ‘externality’: cUS/kWh (after Sundqvist et al, 2005)
    18. 18. Hidden Ambiguities in ‘Sound Science’Energy technologies: mature, sophisticated comparative analysis… n=coal 36oil 20gas 31nuclear 21hydro 16wind 18solar 11biomass 22
    19. 19. Closing Down Policy Knowledgecontrasting aspects of ‘incertitude’ unproblematic RISK engineered components closed deterministic systems high frequency knowledge incidents familiar contexts about INCERTITUDE likelihoods open dynamic systems low frequency events human factors changing contexts problematic UNCERTAINTY - Socrates, Lao Tzu, Knight, Keynes, Shackle, Collingridge, Smithson, Ravetz, Wynne ...
    20. 20. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecontrasting aspects of ‘incertitude’ knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY engineered components defining pros & cons closed deterministic contrasting impacts systems high frequency diverse perspectives knowledge incidents familiar contexts alternative options about INCERTITUDE likelihoods open dynamic systems novel agents or vectors low frequency events surprising conditions human factors new alternatives changing contexts wilful blinkers problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE - Socrates, Lao Tzu, Knight, Keynes, Shackle, Collingridge, Smithson, Ravetz, Wynne ...
    21. 21. Pressures for Closureinstitutional pressures ‘close down’ around risk assessment knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY aggregative analysis patronage, pressure political closure knowledge about insurance limits ` evidence-based reductive models policy likelihoods stochastic reasoning institutional remits political liability protection culture harm definitions indicators / metrics problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE risk focus is shaped by power – Beck’s “organised irresponsibility”
    22. 22. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY aggregated probabilities optimisation algorithms synthetic decision trees Delphi / Foresight knowledge predictive modelling about likelihoods problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE
    23. 23. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY aggregated probabilities optimisation algorithms synthetic decision trees Delphi / Foresight knowledge predictive modelling about likelihoods burden of evidence onus of persuasion uncertainty factors decision heuristics interval analysis sensitivity testing problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE challenges to expert quantitative assessment
    24. 24. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY aggregated probabilities scenarios / backcasting optimisation algorithms interactive modelling synthetic decision trees mapping / Q-methods Delphi / Foresight participatory deliberation knowledge predictive modelling democratic procedures about likelihoods burden of evidence onus of persuasion uncertainty factors decision heuristics interval analysis sensitivity testing problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE challenges to incumbent mainstream framings
    25. 25. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY aggregated probabilities scenarios / backcasting optimisation algorithms interactive modelling synthetic decision trees mapping / Q-methods Delphi / Foresight participatory deliberation knowledge predictive modelling democratic procedures about likelihoods burden of evidence responsive civic research onus of persuasion curiosity monitoring, uncertainty factors evidentiary presumptions decision heuristics flexibility, reversibility interval analysis diversity, resilience, sensitivity testing agility, adaptability problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE challenges to wilful and instrumental blinkers
    26. 26. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY definitive participatory prescription deliberation knowledge Options about likelihoods safety Options precautionary adaptive sustainability appraisal learning problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE ‘opening up’: options, issues, approaches, possibilities, perspectives
    27. 27. Civil Society Opens Up Policy Knowledgecivil society ‘sub-politics’ helps counter institutional closure knowledge about possibilities unproblematic problematic unproblematic RISK AMBIGUITY definitive participatory prescription deliberation knowledge active civil about society helps likelihoods force humility and reflexivity precautionary adaptive appraisal learning problematic UNCERTAINTY IGNORANCE ‘opening up’: options, issues, approaches, possibilities, perspectives
    28. 28. Innovation studies neglects civil society…Blind spot in social and political science of innovation (Smith, 05)- political science: ‘systems of production’, but not innovation (Hollingsworth 97)- social movements research: ideas, institutions, interests – not technology (Smith, 05)- social studies of technology: only general ‘pressure’ (Poel, 00; Jamison, 99)- multi-level model acknowledges role … (Schot, 03; Geels, 08) …but pays insufficient attention to role of politics and power (Smith et al, 05)Restricted focus in innovation systems research- explicitly excluded in ‘triple helix’ (government, industry, academia) (Etzkowitz 05)- sidelined as general factor in healthy economy (Fukuyama 00)- relevant only at lower levels of regional systems of innovation (Cook 98)- implicated indirectly thro’ small business ‘partnerships’ in development (Hall 01)- on ‘democracy’: focus is on education system, not civil society (Lundvall 09)
    29. 29. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICALFor instance,a las seen under S o c io -te c h n ic ’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap ethe ‘Multi-level Perspective’: d e v e l o p m e n t s L an d scap e environmental drivers / p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , political pressuresdrivers / environmental w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s political pressures o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s re g im e in flu e n c e s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. saturation / incumbent inertia O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g windows of opportunity / a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . breakthrough / reconfiguration E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICALTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . experimentation / learning D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . T im e after Geels, 2002
    30. 30. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e environmental drivers / L a n d s c a p e d e v e lo p m e n ts p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , political pressuresdrivers / environmental w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s political pressures o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s re g im e in flu e n c e s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. saturation / incumbent inertia O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g windows of opportunity / a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . breakthrough / reconfiguration E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICALTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . experimentation / learning D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . T im e after Geels, 2002
    31. 31. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e environmental drivers / L a n d s c a p e d e v e lo p m e n ts p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , political pressuresdrivers / environmental w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s political pressures o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s re g im e in flu e n c e s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. saturation / incumbent inertia O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g windows of opportunity / a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . breakthrough / reconfiguration E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICALTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . experimentation / learning D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . T im e after Geels, 2002
    32. 32. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e environmental drivers / L a n d s c a p e d e v e lo p m e n ts p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , political pressuresdrivers / environmental w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s political pressures o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s re g im e in flu e n c e s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. saturation / incumbent inertia O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g windows of opportunity / a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. reconfigured A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . breakthrough / reconfiguration socio-technical regime E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICALTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . experimentation / learning D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . T im e after Geels, 2002
    33. 33. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ la n d s c a p e L a n d s c a p e d e v e lo p m e n ts p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s re g im e in flu e n c e s o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. - consumer boycotts eg: O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s nuclear power N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. - protest and lobbying A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . chlorine chemicals - counter-expertise deepsea oil E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . T e c h n o lo g ic a l n ic h e s L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . T im e
    34. 34. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ la n d s c a p e L a n d s c a p e d e v e lo p m e n ts p u t p re s s u re o n e x is tin g re g im e , w h ic h o p e n s u p , N e w s o c io -te c h n ic a l c re a tin g w in d o w s re g im e in flu e n c e s o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. - consumer boycotts O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. - protest and lobbying A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . - counter-expertise eg: organic food E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum renewable energy I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICAL low energy housingTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES - activist visions - DIY inventors L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . - grassroots innovation - early adopters T im e
    35. 35. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e - movement building -L penvironmentaln gtdrivers / politicale ovclimater e g i m e , an d scap e d e lo p m e s - institutional structure u t p re s s u re n e x is tin - awareness raising - politicalnchange culturee spressures w h ic h o p up, - trade patterns- t e c h n i c a l N e w s o c io c re a tin g w in d o w s re g im e in flu e n c e s o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r eg: genetic modification p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try air pollution REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re nuclear weapons T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. - consumer boycotts O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. - protest and lobbying A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . - counter-expertise E le m e n ts a r e g r a d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r, alignment / stabilisation / a n d s ta b ilis e in a d o m in a n t d e s ig n . momentum I n te rn a l m o m e n tu m in c re a s e s . TECHNOLOGICALTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES - activist visions - DIY inventors L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . - grassroots innovation - early adopters T im e
    36. 36. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e - movement building -L penvironmentaln gtdrivers / politicale ovclimater e g i m e , an d scap e d e lo p m e s - institutional structure u t p re s s u re n e x is tin - awareness raising - politicalnchange culturee spressures w h ic h o p up, - trade patterns- t e c h n i c a l N e w s o c io c re a tin g w in d o w s re g im e in flu e n c e s o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. - consumer boycotts O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. - protest and lobbying A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . - community mobilisation - counter-expertise - green consumption - nlcommunityo aml l yi n la i nn tk de de s ti og gn e. t h e r , E e m e n ts a re g ra d u a d s t a b i l i s e i n a d mobilisation -n greeno consumption source software I t e r n a l meg:e n t u m i n c ropen m eases. TECHNOLOGICAL waste recyclingTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i community growing NICHES - activist visions - DIY inventors L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . - grassroots innovation - early adopters T im e
    37. 37. …but civil society doesn’t neglect innovation! SOCIO-TECHNICAL S o c io -te c h n ic a l’ l a LANDSCAPE n d scap e - movement building -L penvironmentaln gtdrivers / politicale ovclimater e g i m e , an d scap e d e lo p m e s - institutional structure u t p re s s u re n e x is tin - awareness raising - politicalnchange culturee spressures w h ic h o p up, - trade patterns- t e c h n i c a l N e w s o c io c re a tin g w in d o w s re g im e in flu e n c e s o f o p p o rtu n ity fo r n o v e ltie s la n d s c a p e SOCIO- M a rk e ts , u s e r p re fe re n c e s TECHNICAL S o c io - In d u s try REGIME l te c h n ic a r e g im e S c ie n c e P o lic y C u ltu re T e c h n o lo g y S o c io -te c h n ic a l re g im e is ‘d y n a m ic a lly s ta b le ’. - consumer boycotts O n d iffe re n t d im e n s io n s th e re a re o n g o in g p ro c e s s e s N e w c o n f ig u r a tio n b r e a k s th r o u g h , ta k in g - policy shift - mass markets a d v a n ta g e o f ‘w in d o w s o f o p p o rtu n ity ’. - protest and lobbying A d ju s tm e n ts o c c u r in s o c io - te c h n ic a l r e g im e . - behaviour change - training demand - counter-expertise l l y eg: d t o g e t h e low energy lifestyles -Ea ncommunityuo amobilisationr , le m e n ts a r e g r a d lin k e d s ta b ilis e in a d m in a n t d e s ig n . -I ngreen o consumption te rn a l m m e n tu m in c re a s e s . IP-free distribution TECHNOLOGICAL green careersTECHNOLOGICAL c a l T e c h nNICHES n ic h e s o lo g i NICHES - activist visions - DIY inventors L e a r n in g p r o c e s s e s ta k e p la c e o n m u ltip le d im e n s io n s . D iffe re n t e le m e n ts a re g ra d u a lly lin k e d to g e th e r in a s e a m le s s w e b . - grassroots innovation - early adopters T im e civil society is the main driver of radical transformation
    38. 38. ‘Opening Up’ Innovation Governance privileged POSSIBLE visions technological ‘lock-in’ innovation union PATHWAYS knowledge economy multiple feasible Innovation trajectories IIIIII € $ narrow restricted ‘closed down’ inputs outputs appreciation presumed benefits institutionalised single ‘best’ / ‘optimal’ / Options technical risk most ‘legitimate’ case-by-case focus assessment decisions narrow remits aggregated attention regulatory capture risk technocratic procedures
    39. 39. ‘Opening Up’ Innovation Governance diversity in technology portfolios POSSIBLE diverse knowledge PATHWAYS pathways democracy    IIIIII IIIIII   $ $     CIVIL SOCIETY    broad-based choice ‘opening up’ inputs discourse outputs more acknowledge Options options, plurality and issues, conditionality uncertainties, perspectives Sustainability
    40. 40. ‘Opening Up’ Innovation Governance diversity in technology portfolios POSSIBLE diverse knowledge PATHWAYS pathways democracy    IIIIII IIIIII   help catalyse: $ $   democratic accountability   context sensitivity   social robustness  broad-based choice ‘opening up’ inputs discourse outputs more acknowledge Options options, plurality and issues, conditionality uncertainties, perspectives Sustainability
    41. 41. A ‘3D’ AGENDADirection open up politics of knowledge & innovationDistribution empower marginal and vulnerable peopleDiversity enable pluralities of innovation pathways www.anewmanifesto.org

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