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Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times
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Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times

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A presentation by John Thompson, David Manuel-Navarrete, Maja Göpel and Moritz Remig at the Resilience 2014 conference in Montpellier, France on 7 May 2014.

A presentation by John Thompson, David Manuel-Navarrete, Maja Göpel and Moritz Remig at the Resilience 2014 conference in Montpellier, France on 7 May 2014.

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  • FORWARD A QUANTUM FUTURE OF BIO-ECONOMY : http://dabpensiero.wordpress.com/2014/12/09/quassi-project-quantum-art-science-society-for-a-responsible-innovation/. Paolo Manzelli: egocreanet2012@gmail.com
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  • SEARCH FOR PARTNERS : How research organizations may achieve a quantum jump for improving the quality of an higher responsible innovation in a short time? This challenging queston is the focus of the Project QUASSI ( Quantum Art , Science and Society for Responsible Innovation ) project . .The world "Quantum" is not only used as the meaning in quantum-physics as a quantum jump , but more extensively or metaphorically, quantum jump or quantum leap also indicates a leap or a radical paradigm shift in science, technology or in other cultural and societal contexts. Therefore Quantum Jump is more than just a tag line. It is the effective QUASSI mission for new solutions, for launching the project to the next higher qualitative levels of knowledge society development... ---> QUASSI MISSION is focused on : "obtaining the full benefits of the bioeconomy will require purposive RRI- goal-oriented policy" ---> The QUASSI main issue will be : "Resource Based BIO-ECONOMY Development in Quantum Science ,Art and Society though a multi -actors approach " for responsible developmental sustainability" . ---> The R&I Responsible Priorities would be : WP1. Understanding Policy strategies for improving a quantum jump in bio-economy and food sovereignty. WP2 .Implement the obvercoming of RRI barriers in Future Trends of Functional Food for bioeconomy and health innovation WP3 . Favor RRI contents and programmes for emerging biotechnology for environmental and bio-diversity long -term sustainability for ensuring biotechnology innovation and industry growth WP4 - Responsible perspectives of innovation and ethics in transdisciplinary bio - medicine, focused on recently emergent fronts in areas in biomedical research such as the molecular basis of diseases and cells apoptosis. Generation of emergent frontiers of quantum-medicine searching for alternative methods of care by integrating quantum-physics.and medicine for improving responsible states of health. WP5-. Promoting and disseminating activities to produce tangible results in the reorganization process and collaborative structures of Research and Innovation in Quantum Resource Based BIO-ECONOMY Development that reflects societal needs following the the need to re-engineer the biotech economic model. --> see n facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hariohmshantihi --> Type of action: Coordination and Support Actions. RRI: http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/h2020-section/responsible-research-innovation. EU_BIO-ECONOMY : http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/horizon2020/en/h2020-section/bioeconomy ----------------------------------------------- The QUASSI PROJECT will require leadership, from Institutions leading firms, to establish goals for the application of advances in quanttum biotechnology and to food functional innovation for a higher quality of production and people health . NB. The proposals should include an international dimension in particular with the following countries: Brazil, Republic of South Africa, India, Canada, Australia, Russia, United States of America, Japan and China. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SEE: http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/national_bioeconomy_blueprint_april_2012.pdf; SEE OECD: http://www.oecd.org/sti/sci-tech/1913021.pdf; Paolo Manzelli 04 DEC/2014
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  • 1. Towards a Sustainable and Socially Just Transformation Reflections on Karl Polanyi and the Emergence of New Forms of Governance and Social Relations in Uncertain Times John Thompson, David Manuel-Navarrete, Maja Göpel and Moritz Remig 7 May 2014 1
  • 2. Karl Polanyi and The Great Transformation: Framing the Debate John Thompson The STEPS Centre, University of Sussex Institute of Development Studies, UK 7 May 2014 2
  • 3. Why This Dialogue Session? Purpose: Draw insights from the work of Karl Polanyi, particularly ‘The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time’ Goals: 1. Highlight the relevance of Polanyi’s critical political economic analysis to Resilience thinking 2. Explore an emerging research agenda that links Polanyian ideas with the Transformation agenda 3
  • 4. Renewed Interest 4 1886-1964
  • 5. The ‘Stark Utopia’ of the Market “The idea of a self-adjusting market implied a stark utopia. Such an institution could not exist for any length of time without annihilating the human and natural substance of society; it would have physically destroyed man and transformed his surrounding into a wilderness.” – Karl Polanyi The Great Transformation (p.3) 5
  • 6. ‘Fictitious Commodification’ “Labor is only another name for a human activity which goes with life itself, which in its turn is not produced for sale but for entirely different reasons, nor can that activity be detached from the rest of life, be stored or mobilized; land is only another name for nature, which is not produced by man; actual money, finally is merely a token of purchasing power which, as a rule, is not produced at all, but comes into being through the mechanism of banking or state finance. None of them is produced for sale.” – Karl Polanyi The Great Transformation (p. 79) 6
  • 7. ‘Double Movement’ "The social history of our time is the result of a double movement: The one is the principle of economic liberalism, aiming at the establishment of a self- regulating market; the other is the principle of social protection, aiming at the conservation of man and nature as productive organisation." 7 – Karl Polanyi The Great Transformation (p. 136)
  • 8. Polanyi’s Great Transformation Large parts of economic processes separate from society and rule social relations instead of being regulated to benefit societal needs – ‘fictitious commodification‘ of land, labour and money Institutional and governance innovations seek to re- embed these market forces into social relations – ‘double movement‘ Economy Society Society Economy Society becomes an ‘annex‘ to economic and market forces ... But where does the environment fit into this picture? 8
  • 9. The Current Crisis There are 3 key empirical realities that are of normative concern to the transformation agenda: 1. Inequality – as markets have become more unfettered, levels of inequality have increased in many countries 2. Instability – market volatility has also increased, leading to shocks in prices and availability of energy, food, etc. 3. Un-sustainability – market forces are leading to the transgression of ecological boundaries 9
  • 10. Planetary and Social Boundaries 10
  • 11. Planetary and Social Boundaries 11 Polanyi’s ideas offer a promising basis for a more integrated structural analysis that connects the three key dimensions of our present crisis and opens up opportunities for a critical reflection on governance solutions to help bring about ‘sustainable transformations’ at a time of increasing complexity and uncertainty. This is the focus of our dialogue session today.
  • 12. Karl Polanyi’s Countermovement and Polycentric Governance in Socio-Ecological Systems David Manuel-Navarrete School of Sustainability, Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona, USA 7 May 2014 12
  • 13. Polanyi and Socio-Ecological Systems GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONS NATURE CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS MARKETMARKET SYSTEM BOUNDARY CONDITIONS COUNTER- MOVEMENT 13
  • 14. $elf-regulation Under the Market System • Organization of production lays upon the fiction that land, labor, and money are commodities • The market is self-regulating • Distribution of factors of production is automatic: law of supply and demand • The “gain” motive ensures supply & demand equilibrium through prices • No interference of other social institutions 14
  • 15. Polycentricity and SES GOVERNANCE INSTITUTIONS ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS ACTION SITUATIONS • Coexistence of multiple centers of power, each promoting different goals and values, and all competing to gain ascendancy • Governance as a higher level of organization within the social dimension of SES • Role of trust and reciprocity as key forms of integration fostering collective action over individualistic propensities 15
  • 16. Bases of Socio-ecological Organization Social Status in Monocentric Systems Individual contract Social contract Social Positions in Polycentric Systems FIXED HIERARCHY SELF- REGULATION SELF- ORGANIZATION PRINCIPLE OF ORGANIZATION PRINCIPLE OF ORGANIZATION ? 16
  • 17. Karl Polanyi: Great Systems Thinker Maja Göpel Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy Berlin, Germany 7 May 2014
  • 18. Thinking Economies as Systems Systems are dynamically self-stabilizing units set out to achieve something Each system is composed of • Parts • Connections & • Purpose determining its behavior 18
  • 19. Purpose of the System Today: Gain “Success” “Return on Investment” “Progress” “Development” “Economic Success” “Quarterly Reporting” * Google Image Search 19
  • 20. The Stark Utopia Of A Market System 1. The purpose for this system now seems “normal” but has been an innovation: “nineteenth century civilization alone was economic in a different and distinctive sense, for it chose to base itself on a motive only rarely acknowledged as valid in the history of human societies, and certainly never before raised to the level of a justification of action and behavior in everyday life, namely gain.” (Polanyi, p.30) 2. The “matrix of the self-regulating market” became the ideal image for societal organization: “that is why the control of the economic system by the market is of overwhelming consequence to the whole organization of society: it means no less than the running of society as an adjunct to the market. Instead of the economy being embedded in social relations, social relations are embedded in the economic system.” (Polanyi, p.57) 20
  • 21. Wellbeing in the Economic Gain System Easterlin Paradox: Income and Happiness Decouple  Income security, relative rank in society, social relations core OECD report How’s Life? 2011 21
  • 22. Wellbeing in the Economic Gain System Tim Kasser, The High Price of Materialism: “What happens to our well- being when our desires and goals to attain wealth and accumulate possessions become prominent? When we adopt the messages of consumer culture as personal beliefs?” Extrinsic motivations reduce quality of life and foster anti-social and environmentally indifferent behavior. 22
  • 23. Wellbeing in the Economic Gain System Human Co-Creation: The Performance Effects of Money-Markets  Cost-benefit lens cripples social responsibility and hampers performance 23
  • 24. Paradigm Shifts: Repurposing the System UNEP GEO5 report, 2012, Chapter 16 24
  • 25. Ecosystem Services Through Polanyi’s Lens: From Fictitious Commodification to Behavioural Incentives for Ecosystem Services Moritz Remig Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies e.V. Potsdam, Germany 7 May 2014 25
  • 26. Market Dominance in Environmental Policy • Relevance of Polanyi‘s analysis for today: „land“ (i.e. environment) as a fictitious commodity • Dynamics still at work (Fraser 2012) & expansion of market logic • Recent evolution in environmental policy instruments is dominated by market-based approaches – Payments for Ecosystem Services – REDD+ – Wetland banking – Emission trading schemes 26
  • 27. Payments for Ecosystem Services • Shift towards a provider-gets logic instead of polluter-pays • Definition of PES (Wunder, 2005): 1. „a voluntary transaction where 2. a well-defined Ecosystem Service [ES] (or a land-use likely to secure that service) 3. is being ‘bought’ by a (minimum one) ES buyer 4. from a (minimum one) ES provider 5. if and only if the ES provider secures ES provision (conditionality).” • Resilience and Development: by 2030, payments can benefit 120-163 million low-income households in developing countries estimate (Milder et al., 2010) 27
  • 28. Economists‘ Panacea Might Not Suffice • Fictitious commodification – Commodity fetishism (Kosoy & Cobera, 2010) – The environment as a commodity (Vatn, 2000) • Monetary value of nature is contested • The economist‘s response to external costs is to internalize them – Polanyi and Kapp both underline the systemic character of externalities – It‘s not about internalization but a systemic reduction of environmental stresses 28
  • 29. Insights from a Polanyian Perspective • Integrated and systemic perspective – “Polanyi's approach in The Great Transformation is holistic and ecological, providing a broad framework for the identification, classification, and understanding of social costs.” (Swaney & Evers, 1989) – “Sustaining the biosphere is not an ecological problem, nor a social problem, nor an economic problem. It is an integrated combination of all three." (Holling, 1994) • Dynamic approach: societal transformations • Institutions matter • Combining resilience, development and empowerment 29
  • 30. New Perspective for PES: Transforming Behavior • Connecting Transformation and Resilience • Understanding PES as incentive mechanism for changing behavioral practices • Reembedding society in the biosphere – between planetary boundaries (carrying capacity) and development (social justice)  safe and just pathways to sustainability 30
  • 31. Some Questions for Discussion • How can markets become re-embedded in social relations and how can new forms of social protection affect these? • How can a more active ‘developmental state’ help drive sustainable transformation? • How might a protective counter-movement of grassroots resistance emerge to challenge dominant forces ‘from below’? • What governance solutions for ecosystem service regulation might help protect ecosystems and local livelihoods? • How do findings from wellbeing studies relate to the market system’s drive for ever-more productivity and competition of social processes that affect people’s relationship with nature? • How can an empowering Polanyian narrative help challenge the neo-liberal discourse and open up new space for a politically- informed debate on a sustainable ‘Great Transformation’?
  • 32. Thank You

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