Moving forward: how inclusive and unified will our voice be?

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STEPS Water & Sanitation Symposium 2011

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Moving forward: how inclusive and unified will our voice be?

  1. 1. Moving forward-How Inclusive and unified will our voice be Ulemu Chiluzi
  2. 2. <ul><li>Presentation Outline </li></ul><ul><li>Case For The SADC Region </li></ul><ul><li>Case for Malawi </li></ul><ul><li>Political Power Vs Water and Sanitation Provision </li></ul><ul><li>Water Governance and Inappropriate Political Interference </li></ul><ul><li>Challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Moving Forward </li></ul>
  3. 3. Case For The SADC Regional <ul><li>SADC has 15 Member States namely; Angola , Botswana , Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Lesotho , Madagascar , Malawi , Mauritius , Mozambique , Namibia ,  Seychelles , South Africa , Swaziland , United Republic of Tanzania , Zambia and Zimbabwe . The SADC region has defined its water programme as detailed in Regional Strategic Action Plan for Integrated Water Resources Management and Development (RSAPIWRMD). </li></ul>
  4. 4. The programme is driven by the following strategic objectives: <ul><li>  Maintain and sustain an enabling environment for regional water resources development and management; </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a framework for sustainable, effective and efficient planning and management of shared river basins at regional and related national levels; </li></ul><ul><li>Promote and support strategic infrastructure development for regional integration, socio-economic development and poverty alleviation; </li></ul>
  5. 5. Con’t <ul><li>Develop, promote and facilitate best practices regarding effective participation by various individual and institutional stakeholders in water resource development and management, including women, youth and other disadvantaged groups; </li></ul><ul><li>Build and strengthen human and institutional capacity for sustainable management of water resources at basin, national and regional level </li></ul>
  6. 6. Con’t <ul><li>In the SADC region only four countries have managed to increase access to safe drinking water to above 90 percentage coverage namely Botswana, Mauritius, Namibia and South Africa with three countries comprising of Madagascar, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Mozambique, lagging behind with below 50 percent coverage </li></ul><ul><li>In Zimbabwe, the urban population estimated at 4.5 million is projected to increase at a rate of up to six percent per annum, which is almost six times more than the current national population growth rate of 1.1 percent per year. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Cont’ <ul><li>In Mozambique, about two million people live on the degraded urban peripheries, without access to adequate water supply and sewage services. </li></ul><ul><li>In Namibia 45 percent of the rural population had access to clean and safe water in 1991.Since then, the figure has almost doubled. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Case for Malawi <ul><li>25% of the rural communities do not have access to safe water supplies 18.1% of all schools in Malawi use water from unprotected sources. </li></ul><ul><li>11% of the population still defecate in the open and 43% of households in the urban areas share sanitation facilities while 27% do likewise in rural areas. Malawi has a high level of access to some form of basic excreta disposal facilities with coverage estimated at 82.7 </li></ul>
  9. 9. Case For Malawi <ul><li>Sector Financing </li></ul>  2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 Ministry of Water 0.98% 0.75% 0.83% 0.92% 1.66% 2.01% Ministry of Education 11.84% 10.16% 11.28% 10.13% 8.42% 9.17% Ministry of Agriculture 7.82% 12.70% 13.25% 12.08% 14.04% 13.06% Ministry of Health 10.17% 7.28% 7.82% 10.54% 10.10% 8.92%
  10. 13. Political Power Vs Water and Sanitation Provision <ul><li>Political Power exist at all level; Global, Regional and Country level </li></ul><ul><li>Who suffers? </li></ul><ul><li>The findings of a water mapping study in Malawi conducted by Water Aid revealed inequitable distribution of safe water sources largely influenced by political power both at community level and District level. </li></ul>
  11. 14. Con’t <ul><li>There is more political gains in proving safe water than sanitation services especially for the rural communities. Sanitation is not seen as a priority politically despite its devastating impact on health if not addressed and its significant contribution to poverty reduction when addressed. </li></ul>
  12. 15. Water Governance and Inappropriate Political Interference <ul><li>Corporate governance in the provision of water and sanitation services is essential in meeting the MDG and ensuring that the poor have access to water and sanitation but most often faces the challenge of “inappropriate political interference”. </li></ul><ul><li>Most of the Water Utilities are under the Control of Government –Political/Public Good? </li></ul>
  13. 16. Challenges <ul><li>In the SADC region only four countries have managed to increase access to safe drinking water to above 90 percentage coverage namely Botswana, Mauritius, Namibia and South Africa with three countries comprising of Madagascar, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Mozambique, lagging behind with below 50 percent coverage </li></ul>
  14. 17. Cont’ <ul><li>Very little progress has been made to ensure involvement of the private sector in improving access to safe water supply and most governments in Africa retains control of water provision. Reforms have not occurred at the required pace to allow effective governance. </li></ul><ul><li>Little Involvement of private sector </li></ul>
  15. 18. Moving Forward <ul><li>Who Matters in Water and Sanitation? </li></ul><ul><li>It is a known but looks silent in the faces of many that moving forwards with different agendas, principles outlined in most of the protocols, statement, declaration on water and sanitation such as Dablin, and New Delhi principles and the MDGs needs the push of giant like World Bank, UNICEF for Governments to respond at the required pace. The SADC Protocol on Shared Watercourse Systems was signed in August 1995 took 3 years to get the required number of ratifications and came into force in September 1998 </li></ul>
  16. 19. <ul><li>Who is hearing our raised voice? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is the MDG receiving more attention than the other statements made before and after MDG? </li></ul><ul><li>Who is selling today’s Agenda? </li></ul>

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