Maggie Ibrahim: Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach: An Overview
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Maggie Ibrahim: Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach: An Overview

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Presentation at the STEPS Conference 2010 - Pathways to Sustainability: Agendas for a new politics of environment, development and social justice ...

Presentation at the STEPS Conference 2010 - Pathways to Sustainability: Agendas for a new politics of environment, development and social justice

http://www.steps-centre.org/events/stepsconference2010.html

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Maggie Ibrahim: Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach: An Overview Maggie Ibrahim: Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach: An Overview Presentation Transcript

  • Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach An Overview Maggie Ibrahim Institute of Development Studies [email_address]
  • Outline
    • Why a Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach?
    • Overview of the Development of the Approach
    • The Three Pillars of the Approach
    • Lessons from in-depth field research
  • 1. Why a Climate Disaster Risk Management Approach?
  • Why a ‘Climate-Smart Approach to Disaster Risk Management’?
    • The type, frequency and intensity of extreme events are expected to change as Earth’s climate changes (IPCC 2007)
    • This is delivering a catalogue of disaster shocks and livelihoods stresses to the poorest and most vulnerable countries and communities.
    • Development efforts at all scales must become resilient to climate change and disasters in ways that appreciate increasing uncertainty.
  • 2. Overview of the Development of the Approach
  • Overview of the Development of the Approach
    • Development of the approach through:
    • national and regional consultations with more than 500 practitioners, policy makers and academics in 10 at risk countries in South East Asia, South Asia and East Africa
    • 3 cases studies (Mekong River Commission; Orissa State; Post-disaster housing reconstruction in Sri Lanka)
    • UK Consultation and Expert Review Meeting
    • Together we identified 3 key pillars:
    • Tackle Changing Disaster Risk and Uncertainties
    • Enhance Adaptive Capacity
    • Address Poverty, Vulnerability and their Structural Causes
  • 3. The Three Pillars of the Approach
  • Pillar I. Tackle Changing Disaster Risk and Uncertainties
  •  
  • Pillar I: Tackle Changing Disaster Risk and Uncertainties 1a: Strengthen collaboration and integration between diverse stakeholders working on disasters, climate and development 1b: Periodically assess the effects of climate change on current and future disaster risks and uncertainties 1c: Integrate knowledge of changing risks and uncertainties into planning, policy and programme design to reduce the vulnerability and exposure of people’s lives and livelihoods 1d: Increase access of all stakeholders to information and support services concerning changing disaster risks, uncertainties and broader climate impacts
  • Pillar II: Enhance Adaptive Capacity
    • Adaptive capacity - our ability to manage and create sustainable change.
    • Promoting adaptive capacity for social systems means that institutions and networks learn and use knowledge and experience, integrate uncertainty, accept non- equilibrium, create flexibility in problem solving and balance power among interest groups.
    • From our literature review (Bahadur et al, 2010) we have identified 10 characteristics of resilience which promote adaptive capacity.
  • Pillar II: Enhance Adaptive Capacity Cont
    • High Levels of Diversity
    • Flexible and Effective Institutions
    • Cross Scalar Perspective
    • Integrating Uncertainty
    • Ensuring Community Involvement
    • Promoting Equity
    • Accepting Non- Equilibrium
    • Promoting Learning
    • Preparedness, Planning & Readiness
    • Social Values and Structures
    2a: Strengthen the ability of people, organisations and networks to experiment and innovate 2b: Promote regular learning and reflection to improve the implementation of policies and practices 2c: Ensure policies and practices to tackle changing disaster risk are flexible, integrated across sectors and scale and have regular feedback loops 2d: Use tools and methods to plan for uncertainty and unexpected events
  • Pillar III: Address Poverty, Vulnerability and their Structural Causes
    • Turned to the MDGs which highlight agreed goals for poverty reduction.
    • Sought to include key drivers of poverty: social, political, economic & climatic processes.
    • Incorporated notion of continuum of adaptation.
    • Low greenhouse gases & Sustainability.
    McGray et al. 2007
  • Pillar III: Address Poverty, Vulnerability and their Structural Causes 3a: Promote more socially just and equitable economic systems 3b: Forge partnerships to ensure the rights and entitlements of people to access basic services, productive assets and common property resources 3c: Empower communities and local authorities to influence the decisions of national governments, NGOs, international and private sector organisations and to promote accountability and transparency 3d: Promote environmentally sensitive and climate smart development
  • 4. Lesson from in-depth field research
  • Lessons from in-depth field research – Integrating New Knowledge
    • Fieldwork in Cambodia, India and Sri Lanka
    • Integrating climate scenarios requires access to climatological information and data. Independent intermediaries needed.
    • Numerous entry points for a CSDRM approach. Building on existing programmes and policies offers opportunities to identify champions and to create tools and procedures that are grounded in local realities.
  • Lessons from in-depth field research – Ways of Working
    • Promoting the integration requires a range of ‘soft’ skill-sets . This way of working will require staff investment and must be understood in terms of building people’s capabilities to create change.
    • A certain level of independence is required to be flexible and innovate. Donors, governments and business should support independence and ensure accountability measures are in place and maintained.
  • Lessons from in-depth field research - Part Rights and Access
    • Dialogue and access to decision making are critical at all levels. Creating spaces for a range of stakeholders to access information and participate in decision making is needed if positive development outcomes are to be achieved despite a changing climate. This requires partnership and confidence between stakeholders .
    •  
    • Climate change can be a driver for greater integration across sectors, intuitions, policies and programmes .
  • Current SCR Discussion Papers
    • Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management . Mitchell, T.; Ibrahim, M.; Harris, K.; Hedger, M.; Polack, E.; Ahmed, A.; Hall, N.; Hawrylyshyn, K.; Nightingale, K.; Onyango, M.; Adow, M., and Sajjad Mohammed, S.
    • The Resilience Renaissance? Unpacking Of Resilience for Tackling Climate Change and Disasters . Bahadur, A.; Ibrahim, M. and Tanner , T.
    • Assessing Progress on the Convergence of Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation . Mitchell, T., Van Aalst, M. and Villanueva, P.
    • Greening Disaster Risk Management: Issues at the Interface of Disaster Risk Management and Low Carbon Development . Urban, F., Mitchell, T., and Villanueva, P.
    • Integrating Climate Change into Regional Disaster Risk Management at the Mekong River Commission . Polack, E.
    • Building Climate Resilience at State Level: DRM and Rural Livelihoods in Orissa . Hedger, M., Singha, A. and Reddy, M.
    • Post-Disaster Housing Reconstruction in a Conflict-affected District, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka: Reflecting on the Climate Smart Disaster Risk Management Approach . Ibrahim, M.
  • Thank You from the SCR team!
    • Maggie Ibrahim (m.ibrahim@ids.ac.uk) or email: info@csdrm.org
    • Strengthening Climate Resilience (SCR) website : www.csdrm.org