Lidia Brito, UNESCO - #steps13

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Lidia Brito, UNESCO - #steps13

  1. 1. Science for policy, policy for science: a society-centered approach? Lidia Brito Director Science Policy and Capacity Building Division UNESCO l.brito@unesco.org Credibility across cultures: expertise ,uncertainty, and the global politics of scientific advice Brighton, STEPS Center Annual Symposium
  2. 2. Effective structures for Scientific Advice (1) Across scales interventions: from global to local and vice- versa; Connecting diverse groups of stakeholders; Embedded science evidences in decision making processes by redesigning the processes Responding to development challenges: global sustainability and short and medium-term priorities; Building capacities: multiplying the faces and amplifying the voices of scientists in decision-making processes. 2
  3. 3. Effective structures for Scientific Advice (2) Language: communicating complexity in a simpler manner, reducing uncertainty and promoting evidence based decisions Communication channels: from traditional to new ones; Issues covered: who’s question and time scale; Governance models used: addressing several Agendas – how to keep the questions alive? 3
  4. 4. Opportunities in the near future ECOSOC 2013: Science and Culture for Sustainable Development; UN SG Scientific advisory Board Future Earth Science Diplomacy: a growing field But we need more…. The conversations can not stop and the scientific community has a responsibility to maintain the engagement 4
  5. 5. World today Globalized – local decisions global impact; Facing climate change: unexpected and probability of more extreme events; Crisis: uncertainties in finance, energy supply, food supply… Where knowledge and technology is more and more important: exclusion and divides Heavily influenced by the Digital revolution. 6
  6. 6. Polarities in our world? Short term Government agendas the need of long-term policies Economic interests social and environmental sustainability Disciplines inter and transdisciplinary science Known connections hidden connections Certainty uncertainty Political objectives and language science objectives and language Individual and coalition power citizenship solutions 7
  7. 7. Science-policy interface: the meaning of the S Policy Making Processes Science Questions and Agenda Opportunistic Approach 8
  8. 8. Science-policy interface after Rio+20: the meaning of the S  Policies for Science. Science for policy  Long-term vision but  Timely advice short political cycles;  Language adjustment  Accountability  The role of the media  Interdisciplinary and transdiciplinary  Co-design and co-  Citizenship production development ;  Human capital development  Relevance: solutions to today’s problems  Science-society contract 9
  9. 9. From Traditional Leadership to Strategic LeadershipDirection AnticipationProtection EngagingConflict ConflictResolution stimulation Common good (Questioning) Knowledge based Authenticity Openness Empathy
  10. 10. Thank you

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