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Duncan Green, Oxfam - #steps13

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  • 1. MDGs, SDGs and politics Duncan Green February 2013
  • 2. The evidence debate is big
  • 3. The problem with Post2015• ‘If I ruled the world’ -> Christmas Tree• Don’t start from here• MDGs = mainly instrument to sort out aid• All other attribution v dodgy• But aid is falling, both in absolute terms, and (much more) as % of government revenue• So new Q is how does Post2015 influence national government policy-making
  • 4. How to generate traction?• Influence on social norms (eg Convention on Rights of Child, or Discrimination Against Women)• Direct influence on national decision-making (pols and/or officials)• Increase leverage of non-government actors (civil society, private sector, media) in peacetime or elections/windows of opportunity
  • 5. What kinds of instrument?• Big global norms• International Law• Global/Regional goals and targets• Global/regional league tables• Data transparency (enabling environment)
  • 6. Final Thoughts• Post 2015 debate badly off track wrt national traction• Shows how little has changed – (Some) experts dominate debate – Disciplinary bias on what constitutes ‘evidence’ – Complete blind spot on politics and power• Probably too late to make it fit for purpose• But it may be useful in the (shrinking) world of aid
  • 7. For More Discussion• How Can a Post-2015 Agreement Drive Real Change? The Political Economy of Global CommitmentsGreen, Hale and LockwoodOxfam, November 2012