SOCIAL MEDIA, YOUNG PEOPLE
AND E- SAFETY
LEWISHAM EDUCATION
ARTS NETWORK
Introductions
Stephen Carrick-Davies
• Ten years at Childnet International
• Now an Independent Trainer/ Social
Entreprene...
IDENTITY
Impersonation
“Fraping”
RELATIONSHIPS
TRUST
“Sexting”
CONFLICT
Anger
“Game
rage”
COPING
Reporting
“I’m there
for
...
What are your expectations and training needs ?
Risk
Reputation
The 3 Rs of digital literacy
Responsibility
Our safety, conduct
& risky behaviours
Our privacy,
security s...
Understanding the risks
(not the same thing as harm!)
PART I
“Everything that’s already in the world when
you’re born is just normal.
Douglas Adams
How to stop worrying and learn to l...
AMPLIFIER
(gives children
a voice)
ANONYMITY
ALWAYS ON
AWAY FROM
SUPERVISION
ACCEPTANCE -
IDENTITY &
STATUS
ACCESS THE
WOR...
Play film
“I have over 120 people on my BBM but I deleted
like 30 on Saturday cause I was angry and they
pissed me off so ...
What was the greatest fear
for the yp in the film ?
Turn to your neighbour
How did it had got out of control ?
What would ...
A GREAT
PACIFIER !
PORTABLE
PRIVATE +
PERSONAL
EDUCATIONALLY
VALUABLE !
STATUS
SYMBOL
FUN &
GAMES
INTER
GENERATIONAL
ANYTI...
SMART PENS – the latest ‘Internet of Things’
AGE RESTRICTIONS
Social location
APPLICATIONS
Huge range of apps
NEWS FEEDS
“boast by post”
MESSAGES
Superseding E-mail WHO’S ONLINE
Know w...
Facebook Timeline
Re-check
your privacy
settings using
‘View As’
function
Searchable
by years
The importance of privacy se...
What is your experience of using FB with YP ?
Profiles have ‘friends’ and you will always need to create a
professional wo...
A word about BBM
• Be careful with your BBM PIN
• Be careful of ‘Screen Munching’
• Use the tools – like delete contact
an...
See pages 54 – 59 in Vodafone’s Digital Parenting magazine
A word about games
• The ratings are there for a reason.
• Anyone who sells a designated 12+
title to younger children wil...
Our perception of danger
Most abuse takes place in the
context of a family or close
relative.
UPLOADED
(captured)
MUNCHED
FORWARDED
COMMENTED ON
COPIED
STORED
MORPHED/
CHANGED
LIE DORMANT
AMPLIFIED
RE- BROADCAST
An i...
What do you think about this
description of the Internet ?
Feedback
What sort of things could
be hatched ?
GROUP EXERCISE
Classifying the risks to children online
CONTENT
CONTACT
CONDUCT
Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values
Adverts
Spam
Sponsors...
Contact
www.ceop.gov.uk
if you have concerns
about inappropriate
communication from an
adult to a minor.
CONTENT
Child as ...
How the risks ‘migration’ from online to
offline can affect vulnerable YP
CONTENT
CONTACT
CONDUCT
Commercial Aggressive Se...
ASSOCIATION
WITH
SOMEONE
COMPLICIT IN
A JOINT
ENTERPRISE
“You played no
part but
presence there
encouraged
others ”
FAIL T...
Classifying the risks to children online
CONTENT
CONTACT
CONDUCT
Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values
Violent and
hateful
c...
“Sticks and stones.... But words ...?”
From US Ad Council at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdQBurXQOeQ
How is Cyberbullying different from offline bullying?
OFFLINE ONLINE
Home is safe
Often Physical Usually words/pictures
Bu...
Why YP may be scared of reporting abuse ?
• “It was nobody else’s business”
• “Didn’t think it was serious or wrong”
• “Di...
RESPONDING TO THE VICTIM
Need for reassurance – THIS IS BULLYING !
Practical advice:
RED Don’t retaliating,
Orange – Save ...
 Understanding and accepting the
impact of cyberbullying.
 Updating existing policies and
practices. (AUP anti-bullying)...
The young person who you are responsible for (let’s say she’s a
12 year old girl) tells you that her “friends” in her clas...
Risk
Conversations about
ADVICE
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
“Do you know who all your online
friends are offline?”
“Do you know how t...
Questions and feedback so far ?
Let’s break for 10 minutes
WAYS IN WHICH
THE INTERNET
CAN AMPLIFY
VULNERABILITY
10 WAYS IN
WHICH THE
INTERNET CAN
AMPLIFY
OFFLINE
VULNERABILITY
‘Vulnerable’
Those who have experienced offline risk and
abuse may be more resilient and able to
protect themselves online...
Lack of
supportive
adults in their
lives
More
unsupervised
time, fewer
structures and
boundaries
Fluid learning
environmen...
“Many of the young people I work with are massive risk takers,
impulsive to the extreme and often use alcohol and/or drugs...
Unmediated Contact
Children who have been fostered can suddenly receive messages from siblings, birth
parents, or those w...
 Social Location
WAYS IN WHICH
THE INTERNET
CAN AMPLIFY
VULNERABILITY
Young People who may need to escape from an abusive...
Eg Facebook Timeline
 Exclusion from the ‘norm’
There are lots of online services which celebrate our ‘journey’. How do c...
 Blackmailing “gifting” &
grooming by peers
A young person from a disadvantaged background may be targeted with ‘gifts’ o...
Many vulnerable young people can be early adopters of tools and services which are
not yet regulated or in the public cons...
 Being ‘nudged’ into gangs
ALL CHILDREN WILL
LEAVE A FOOTPRINT
EXCEPT SOME WILL BE
IN MUDDIER SAND!
WAYS IN WHICH
THE INT...
 Negative digital footprint
ALL CHILDREN WILL LEAVE A
DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
BUT SOME WILL BE MUDDIER
THAN OTHERS
WAYS IN WHIC...
 Low Resilience
“When my pinger’s gone
to sleep that’s when I’ll
go to sleep.”
WAYS IN WHICH
THE INTERNET
CAN AMPLIFY
VUL...
 Special needs & learning difficulties
•WAYS IN WHICH
THE INTERNET
CAN AMPLIFY
VULNERABILITY
Some children with emotional...
 Low levels of Language & Literacy•WAYS IN WHICH
THE INTERNET
CAN AMPLIFY
VULNERABILITY
We must not assume that all YP ar...
In pairs discuss
GROUP EXERCISE
Do you recognise these 10 offline
vulnerabilities and agree that they
can be amplified onl...
PART II
Reputation
Our privacy,
security settings
and our peer group
What goes online stays online
Social media challenges for youth workers
• Social media applications are mostly designed
around informality, intimacy and...
• Recent TES survey
found that 9% of
teachers were friends
with pupils on SNS*.
Challenges for teachers & other profession...
1. Update your AUPs stating how and when personally owned
equipment (including camera phones) can be used.
2. Make sure yo...
POSITIVE ONLINE IDENTITY
Reputation
ADVICE
Conversations about
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
 “Remember what goes online
stays online”
 “When did you last che...
UNDERSTANDING OUR
RESPONSIBILITIES
PART III
“with great power
comes....”
AN ABSENCE OF KNOWLEDGE IS NOT
AN EXCUSE FOR AN ABSENCE OF
RESPONSIBILITY AND CARE.
WHAT IS POTENTIALLY
CRIMINAL, HARMFUL,...
Policies
Infrastructure Education
Ongoing education &
prevention programme which is
targeted at both YP, parents and
the w...
Policies
Need to be:
 Owned -don’t simply cut and paste another
 Updated for constantly changing technology
 Obeyed – n...
http://network.youthworkonline.org.uk/forum/topics/use-of-facebook-examples-of
A few examples
Resources
Using social media Positively from
Using social media for youth engagement can help organisations:
 Reach young people wh...
Ten top tips to managing social media in adoption*
1 Talk openly and honestly with your children about
social media, conta...
3 Explain to your children the risks involved in
accepting random unknown people as ‘friends’.
4 Make sure they are not ma...
6 Avoid using profile pictures. Instead use the
default pictures or something generic like
flowers, landscapes, football t...
9 Make sure your children are aware of the
risks of joining groups or networks that
identify where they live or go to scho...
In the context of an inspection,
e-safety may be described as the
school’s ability:
to protect and educate pupils and
staf...
Assemblies, tutorial time, personal,
social, health and education lessons,
and an age-appropriate curriculum
for e-safety
...
REACHING PARENTS/CARERS
“Parents and the home environment they create are the
single most important factor in shaping thei...
• Does the technology contribute
to an erosion of empathy ?
If so how ?
• What happens when we
become “comfortably numb”
•...
“You never really understand a
person until you consider things
from his point of view.
Until you climb inside of his skin...
“Empathy is the ability to put ourselves in another’s
place and to understand their experience.
We are deeply present to t...
“Empathy is the ability to put ourselves in another’s
place and to understand their experience.
We are deeply present to t...
Risk
Reputation
Where to start ?
Responsibility
Our safety, conduct
& risky behaviours
Our privacy,
security settings
and ...
Responsibility
Conversations aboutADVICE
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE
 “Have you come across any
good social initiatives?”
 “What ad...
WHAT IS ONE THING YOU ARE GOING TO
ACT UPON ?
Risk Safety, conduct &
risky behaviour
Reputation
Privacy, security
settings...
EVALUATION
Please give feedback.

Useful websites
1) UK law Enforcement agency and part of VGTF
www.ceop.gov.uk
2) UK Council for Child Internet Safety
www....
And Finally….
"The web is more a social
creation than a technical one.
I designed it for social effect -
to help people work together -
...
• Questions about anything which has come up
today ?
THANK YOU !
www.carrick-davies.com
stephen@carrick-davies.com
Complete Evaluation
forms
MUNCH
PING
POKE!
See my current wo...
E  safety training for lewisham arts and education network (advance) by stephen carrick-davies sept 2013
E  safety training for lewisham arts and education network (advance) by stephen carrick-davies sept 2013
E  safety training for lewisham arts and education network (advance) by stephen carrick-davies sept 2013
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E safety training for lewisham arts and education network (advance) by stephen carrick-davies sept 2013

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This presentation was presented to staff working with young people in Lewisham S.London.

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  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies Parents: What is different about cyberbullying ? – form of bullying but some important things which are different Do parents recognise it and respond ? – knowing the key message to tell children. Seeing part of the whole school community. – if your Do they know what they can do once it has happened ? - know who to report –school,industry or police, Children and Young people are seeking validation, they are venting their frustrating, they are pulling pranks, getting even, impersonating, showing off, defaming bullying – no change there then !
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies Parents: What is different about cyberbullying ? – form of bullying but some important things which are different Do parents recognise it and respond ? – knowing the key message to tell children. Seeing part of the whole school community. – if your Do they know what they can do once it has happened ? - know who to report –school,industry or police, Children and Young people are seeking validation, they are venting their frustrating, they are pulling pranks, getting even, impersonating, showing off, defaming bullying – no change there then !
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies Parents: What is different about cyberbullying ? – form of bullying but some important things which are different Do parents recognise it and respond ? – knowing the key message to tell children. Seeing part of the whole school community. – if your Do they know what they can do once it has happened ? - know who to report –school,industry or police, Children and Young people are seeking validation, they are venting their frustrating, they are pulling pranks, getting even, impersonating, showing off, defaming bullying – no change there then !
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies Parents: What is different about cyberbullying ? – form of bullying but some important things which are different Do parents recognise it and respond ? – knowing the key message to tell children. Seeing part of the whole school community. – if your Do they know what they can do once it has happened ? - know who to report –school,industry or police, Children and Young people are seeking validation, they are venting their frustrating, they are pulling pranks, getting even, impersonating, showing off, defaming bullying – no change there then !
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies Whenever I start talking about Childnet’s work I start with this picture. They say a picture speaks a thousand words. This is Tomison Adeloye – a friend of mine. I took this picture of him to illustrate just what it is that children access when going online – The whole world – the positive as well as the potentially harmful. There’s a further point to this picture in that Tomi is deaf. As he told me when I took this photo of him – no-one knows you are deaf on the Internet ! – he uses the same method of communicating – his fingers. – Again this is a powerful reminder that Children don’t really know who they are talking to on line. <Advance> Of course with mobile technology the Internet is now not just in our hands but in our pockets ! As you are seeing in Japan, children are able to access sites such as dating agency sites from their internet enabled phones . I read last week that the National Police Agency here want to ban anyone under 18 from accessing dating sties and we are facing similar calls in the UK and I’ll say something about this later. However, before we talk about the present and the future and the challenges and opportunities I want to go back to one of the founders of the Internet – Tim Berners Lee – generally credited for inventing the WWW. In his book “weaving the web he says”
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies "The web is more a social creation than a technical one. I designed it for social effect - to help people work together - and not as a technical toy. The ultimate goal of the web is to support and improve our weblike existence in the world...... We have to ensure that the society we build with the web is the sort we intend.” This is one of the motivations behind our work. Childnet is not first and foremost a technology charity, we don’t have too many techies on staff. We are motivated to ensure that children benefit from the net – that the future society is one in which the net is used positively to benefit children and that their rights are protected and promoted online. I am sure that many of you here today are committed to this ideal and want to ensure that our future society is shaped by positive applications of the net.
  • Childnet presentation on Social Networking 26 June 2006 Stephen Carrick-Davies
  • E safety training for lewisham arts and education network (advance) by stephen carrick-davies sept 2013

    1. 1. SOCIAL MEDIA, YOUNG PEOPLE AND E- SAFETY LEWISHAM EDUCATION ARTS NETWORK
    2. 2. Introductions Stephen Carrick-Davies • Ten years at Childnet International • Now an Independent Trainer/ Social Entrepreneur /Parent/Learner ..... Social Media & Vulnerable YP people
    3. 3. IDENTITY Impersonation “Fraping” RELATIONSHIPS TRUST “Sexting” CONFLICT Anger “Game rage” COPING Reporting “I’m there for you”
    4. 4. What are your expectations and training needs ?
    5. 5. Risk Reputation The 3 Rs of digital literacy Responsibility Our safety, conduct & risky behaviours Our privacy, security settings and our peer group Our leadership, ethical code and resilience
    6. 6. Understanding the risks (not the same thing as harm!) PART I
    7. 7. “Everything that’s already in the world when you’re born is just normal. Douglas Adams How to stop worrying and learn to love the internet 1999 Anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and with any luck you can make a career out of it. Anything that gets invented after you’re thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it… …until it’s been around for about ten years ….when it gradually turns out to be alright really.”  The risk of misunderstanding
    8. 8. AMPLIFIER (gives children a voice) ANONYMITY ALWAYS ON AWAY FROM SUPERVISION ACCEPTANCE - IDENTITY & STATUS ACCESS THE WORLD ACTIVE NOT PASSIVE MEDIUM ADDICTIVE (?) “If you took away my mobile phone you would take away a part of me” The child’s online world real
    9. 9. Play film “I have over 120 people on my BBM but I deleted like 30 on Saturday cause I was angry and they pissed me off so I just deleted them. Since I’ve had my BlackBerry only 2 people have deleted me.” Student from Pupil Referral Unit What is this world like for vulnerable YP ?real Film at www.carrick-davies.com/research/films
    10. 10. What was the greatest fear for the yp in the film ? Turn to your neighbour How did it had got out of control ? What would you do next if you were in that position ? GROUP EXERCISE
    11. 11. A GREAT PACIFIER ! PORTABLE PRIVATE + PERSONAL EDUCATIONALLY VALUABLE ! STATUS SYMBOL FUN & GAMES INTER GENERATIONAL ANYTIME, ANYWHERE ANYWAY PRACTICAL USEAGE photo/video Apps etc The game changer
    12. 12. SMART PENS – the latest ‘Internet of Things’
    13. 13. AGE RESTRICTIONS
    14. 14. Social location APPLICATIONS Huge range of apps NEWS FEEDS “boast by post” MESSAGES Superseding E-mail WHO’S ONLINE Know who is online now! PHOTOS/TAGS Comment and Tag photos face recognition LIVE CHAT Superseding IM FRIENDS Find, link, be in constant contact + on your mobile VIDEO link and embed Events/ Groups ALL FOR FREE …… BUT ….WHAT PRICE IS FREE ? TIME LINE
    15. 15. Facebook Timeline Re-check your privacy settings using ‘View As’ function Searchable by years The importance of privacy settings 31% of 12-15 year olds don’t use privacy settings on their social networking profiles – Ofcom Media literacy Report 2009 Check regularly because the settings change
    16. 16. What is your experience of using FB with YP ? Profiles have ‘friends’ and you will always need to create a professional work profile to manage any engagement on a profile, but you do not necessarily have to accept friend requests from young people. Groups have ‘members’ and can be public, private or invite providing a discussion and media sharing space. The creator of the group moderates members and conversations. Groups work well when there is a clear shared interest or sense of community between group members. Sometimes groups are used as a form of petition — where individuals join a group to display their support for an idea or issue. You can message all the members of a group direct to their Facebook inbox. Pages have ‘fans’. A page is similar to a profile, but pages are for organisations and projects rather than for people. They are a good tool for sharing information and getting feedback by allowing comments on the content you share. You can add Facebook applications and add-on features to your pages to make them more interactive
    17. 17. A word about BBM • Be careful with your BBM PIN • Be careful of ‘Screen Munching’ • Use the tools – like delete contact and block future requests. • Make sure your blackberry has a password See www.carrick-davies.com for film and tutorial. (bottom of the page)
    18. 18. See pages 54 – 59 in Vodafone’s Digital Parenting magazine
    19. 19. A word about games • The ratings are there for a reason. • Anyone who sells a designated 12+ title to younger children will face fines of up to £5,000 /jail. • Recognise the ‘compulsion’ issues. • Younger siblings and friends. • Misogynistic messages and casual cruelty.
    20. 20. Our perception of danger Most abuse takes place in the context of a family or close relative.
    21. 21. UPLOADED (captured) MUNCHED FORWARDED COMMENTED ON COPIED STORED MORPHED/ CHANGED LIE DORMANT AMPLIFIED RE- BROADCAST An incubator ? What terms do we use to explain this space ?
    22. 22. What do you think about this description of the Internet ? Feedback What sort of things could be hatched ? GROUP EXERCISE
    23. 23. Classifying the risks to children online CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Adverts Spam Sponsorship Personal info Violent and hateful content Pornographic unwelcome sexual content Bias Racist Misleading info or advice Tracking Harvesting Personal info Being bullied harassed or stalked Meeting strangers Being groomed Self harm Unwelcome persuasions Illegal downloading Hacking Gambling Financial scams Terrorism Bullying or harassing another Creating and uploading inappropriate material Providing misleading info/advice Original 3 Cs Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project Child as Recipient Child as Participant Child as Actor
    24. 24. Contact www.ceop.gov.uk if you have concerns about inappropriate communication from an adult to a minor. CONTENT Child as Recipient CONTACT Child as Participant CONDUCT Child as Actor Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Pornographic unwelcome sexual content Meeting strangers Being groomed Creating and uploading inappropriate material Online grooming is a criminal offence “One-third of those who sexually abuse children are just children themselves.” BBC Newsnight programme March 2010 21,630 BEBO members had the name “Porn Star” “Sexting” = teens sharing nude photos via mobiles and web. The practice can have serious legal and psychological consequences “So take a dirty picture for me, Take a dirty picture Just take a dirty picture for me Take a dirty picture” From Taio Cruz song No 6 in the UK charts April 2010.
    25. 25. How the risks ‘migration’ from online to offline can affect vulnerable YP CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Child as Recipient Child as Participant Child as Actor CRIMINAL BEING IN THE WRONG PLACE AT THE WRONG TIME & “BAD LUCK” OF THE 1,984 PEOPLE CHARGED AFTER RIOTS:  53% were under 20 years old  42% received free school meals (16% nat. average)  66% of them had some special education needs (21% of all pupils) Figures from the Ministry of Justice carried out by the Howard League for Penal Reform (published in Guardian 26.11.11) Original 3 Cs Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project
    26. 26. ASSOCIATION WITH SOMEONE COMPLICIT IN A JOINT ENTERPRISE “You played no part but presence there encouraged others ” FAIL TO INTERVENE FAILURE TO WALK AWAY ! INCLUDES ONLINE EVIDENCE OF ASSOCIATION & ENCOURAGEMENT JOINT ENTERPRISE: Legislation that finds people guilty of a violent crime if they are judged to have lent encouragement to the main perpetrator. “They planned the attack on social media the night before, the court was told, sending messages to each other on Facebook and via BlackBerry Messenger.”
    27. 27. Classifying the risks to children online CONTENT CONTACT CONDUCT Commercial Aggressive Sexual Values Violent and hateful content Being bullied harassed or stalked Bullying or harassing another Classification by ‘EU Kids’ online project and referenced in the Byron Report Child as Recipient Child as Participant Child as Actor 22% of yp aged 11- 18 report having been cyber bullied. It ruins lives. YP may not disclose that it is happening
    28. 28. “Sticks and stones.... But words ...?” From US Ad Council at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdQBurXQOeQ
    29. 29. How is Cyberbullying different from offline bullying? OFFLINE ONLINE Home is safe Often Physical Usually words/pictures Bully strong/victim weak Roles can change Can be 24/7 Local & intimate Mass audience See the impact Don’t see impact Lack of empathy Bystanders intervene Bystanders take part “If you laugh at it you’re part of it” Often Silent It can leave a trail !
    30. 30. Why YP may be scared of reporting abuse ? • “It was nobody else’s business” • “Didn’t think it was serious or wrong” • “Didn’t want parents/friends to find out” • “Was frightened” • “Didn’t think I would be believed” • “Had been threatened by the abuser” Source: Child Maltreatment in the UK Cawson 2000 • “My parents don’t get the internet” • “Maybe it was my fault ! (blur)” • “Scared if computer is confiscated” Abuse on the internet/mobile phone
    31. 31. RESPONDING TO THE VICTIM Need for reassurance – THIS IS BULLYING ! Practical advice: RED Don’t retaliating, Orange – Save the evidence Green – Tell someone (who?) See advice, resources and guidance at Childnet’s www.digizen.org website
    32. 32.  Understanding and accepting the impact of cyberbullying.  Updating existing policies and practices. (AUP anti-bullying)  Making reporting easier - includes advice about removal of content. (industry support)  Promoting the positive use of technology.  Evaluating impact of prevention activities. PREVENTING RESPONDING  Supporting the victim – need for reassurance.  Practical advice and support such as saving evidence, not retaliating, informing parents.  Investigate and record incidents, identify the bully.  Working with the bully and sanctions (including technology specific).  Involve Parents /carers Underpinned by effective education and awareness
    33. 33. The young person who you are responsible for (let’s say she’s a 12 year old girl) tells you that her “friends” in her class took video clip of her at a sleep over pyjama party on their phones which is now being circulated and she thinks it is now posted on a social networking site. •Is this an issue for your school/organisation •What advice would you give to her ? •Who should the girl report this to ? •How would you go about trying to remove this content ? •What if those who posted it up have circulated it more widely ? GROUP EXERCISE
    34. 34. Risk Conversations about ADVICE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE “Do you know who all your online friends are offline?” “Do you know how to block someone on Facebook?” “Do you have a PIN on your mobile phone?” “Do any of your friends send photos of themselves?” “Do you know how to save that sort of evidence?” “Would you report that at school/CEOP?” FOR OUR STAFF “Have we assessed how we as staff and our users could be vulnerable online?” “If we use Social Media do we set clear guidance on use ?” “Do we use an organisation mobile phone if working with yp ? (ie not our personal one?” “Do we know how to save evidence and intervene or reporting to CEOP?”
    35. 35. Questions and feedback so far ? Let’s break for 10 minutes
    36. 36. WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY 10 WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY OFFLINE VULNERABILITY
    37. 37. ‘Vulnerable’ Those who have experienced offline risk and abuse may be more resilient and able to protect themselves online or may not be affected so much by the risks they encounter. HOWEVER WE CAN IDENTIFY A FEW COMMON FEATURES.... This is complex because: All children are different so there are dangers in making broad statements. Vulnerability is not static - All children can be vulnerable at different stages Many children are neglected which is harder to spot yet makes them vulnerable The categorisations of risk offline do not necessarily mirror online experience (eg a disabled yp may be empowered online as the internet can be ‘leveller’ The paradox that over- protected children can be more vulnerable online. The more a child uses the internet the more they can become confident and possibly complacent and feel ‘invincible’ and don’t feel they are at risk. What about vulnerable adults ? Constantly changing technologies. Eg, Location services
    38. 38. Lack of supportive adults in their lives More unsupervised time, fewer structures and boundaries Fluid learning environment and gaps in education and induction Low self- confidence. Identity seen to be part of ‘outsiders’ Influences of alcohol, drugs and gang culture. Risk takers and at risk Experience abusive relationships or environments including anger MUNCH POKE PING! See www.carrick-davies.com
    39. 39. “Many of the young people I work with are massive risk takers, impulsive to the extreme and often use alcohol and/or drugs. On average they first engage in sexual activity at a far younger age than other students. They also have huge amounts of unsupervised time on their hands, often till very late at night. I teach many YP who are half- asleep as they have been online till gone 3am.” PRU staff member from ‘MPP’ report “I have over 120 people on my BBM but I deleted like 30 on Saturday cause I was angry and they pissed me off so I just deleted them. Since I’ve had my BlackBerry only 2 people have deleted me.” PRU student from ‘MPP’ report WE MAY SEE THEM AS VULNERABLE BUT THEY MAY SEE THEMSELVES AS IN CONTROL
    40. 40. Unmediated Contact Children who have been fostered can suddenly receive messages from siblings, birth parents, or those who want to trace them for potentially harmful reasons. WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Guardian Newspaper article 19 June 2010
    41. 41.  Social Location WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Young People who may need to escape from an abusive relationships need to think carefully about how they make their ‘places’ public.
    42. 42. Eg Facebook Timeline  Exclusion from the ‘norm’ There are lots of online services which celebrate our ‘journey’. How do children who don’t know their birth parents, may not have an early photo of themselves feel in these ‘boast by post’ environments ? WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY
    43. 43.  Blackmailing “gifting” & grooming by peers A young person from a disadvantaged background may be targeted with ‘gifts’ of mobile phones, mobile payment cards etc, by older young people but in exchange for ‘favours’ which they ‘cash in’ later (including prostitution, trafficking or illegal activity). If it sounds to good to be true .... it’s probably is (they want something ! ) Search ‘NSPCC survey on teen partner violence’ for more info WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY
    44. 44. Many vulnerable young people can be early adopters of tools and services which are not yet regulated or in the public conscious. For example BBM How will QR codes be mis-used ?  Earlier adopters ? Screen Munch ! WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY “Any A/C holders looking to make a quick grand get at me. No time wasters.” Message on BBM about bank scams (fraud!)
    45. 45.  Being ‘nudged’ into gangs ALL CHILDREN WILL LEAVE A FOOTPRINT EXCEPT SOME WILL BE IN MUDDIER SAND! WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Vulnerable young people who are risk takers, impulsive or under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs and less supervised, can be more easily drawn into illegal activity including being ‘nudged’ through technology.
    46. 46.  Negative digital footprint ALL CHILDREN WILL LEAVE A DIGITAL FOOTPRINT BUT SOME WILL BE MUDDIER THAN OTHERS WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Those who are supported can compensate and build positive online footprint but what about those who aren’t ?
    47. 47.  Low Resilience “When my pinger’s gone to sleep that’s when I’ll go to sleep.” WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Young people need to be cherished, have the right amount of sleep and healthy food. What happens when you are running on empty ?
    48. 48.  Special needs & learning difficulties •WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY Some children with emotional or behavioural difficulties, attachment difficulties, and other complex needs, may be particularly vulnerable online. EG those with Autistim Spectrum Disorder may make literal interpretations of content, which will affect how they respond. Others with complex needs may not understand the concept of friendship, and therefore trust everyone implicitly. Some children with SEN or disabilities may not recognise that they are being bullied or appreciate how their own online behaviour may be seen by someone else as bullying. Attachment Attachment Theory
    49. 49.  Low levels of Language & Literacy•WAYS IN WHICH THE INTERNET CAN AMPLIFY VULNERABILITY We must not assume that all YP are confident “digital natives” and we must also recognise that one in six people in the UK struggle with literacy (below the level expected of an eleven year old). Hence being able to complete a ‘REPORT ABUSE’ form or read instructions about safety, privacy and ‘terms and conditions’ are real barriers for many young people. Do YP recognise the link between reading and being able to be safe ? Lack of literacy skills, can mean that messages are unclear, ambiguous or misunderstood
    50. 50. In pairs discuss GROUP EXERCISE Do you recognise these 10 offline vulnerabilities and agree that they can be amplified online ? How could you begin to talk to the YP you look after about these issues? Can you think of positive ways in which the Internet minimises offline vulnerabilities?
    51. 51. PART II Reputation Our privacy, security settings and our peer group What goes online stays online
    52. 52. Social media challenges for youth workers • Social media applications are mostly designed around informality, intimacy and speed. • Contact with students outside of the classroom is not only easier it is actively encouraged. (VLEs, online collaboration etc). • BUT Young people can view one-to-one communication as a very private “chumminess” and feel especially valued. • The boundaries between professional/private expert and learner, home and work, formal and informal are blurring. • The technology can be used as vehicles for false allegations, and exposing teachers to ridicule and humiliation. • But... there are a range of views with some teachers & Youth Workers wanting to positively embrace technology to support pupils and there are very real positives especially for some pupils eg excluded, SEN,
    53. 53. • Recent TES survey found that 9% of teachers were friends with pupils on SNS*. Challenges for teachers & other professionals * http://community.tes.co.uk/forums/t/463065.aspx?s_cid=16 See http://www.childnet.com/kia/downloads/Social-networking.pdf for Childnet/TDA leaflet • General advice from unions and GTS is: Do not ‘friend’ pupils on personal accounts or ask to be added to their contact lists. You could make yourself vulnerable by sharing your personal information (and that of your friends) You could make yourself vulnerable by being able to access their personal information You could make yourself open to allegations of inappropriate contact or be misunderstood. WHY ?
    54. 54. 1. Update your AUPs stating how and when personally owned equipment (including camera phones) can be used. 2. Make sure you have a strong password and set a password or pin for your phone. Increasingly important for Facebook ‘Fraping’ 3. Close down computers quickly if you have to leave a room and don’t allow cookies to ‘remember your password’ 4. Do not post information about yourself publically that you wouldn’t want employers, colleagues, pupils or parents to see. 5. Make sure you do not retaliate but keep all records – screen prints and record time, date & website addresses 6. Report any incident to the appropriate member of staff promptly 7. Make sure the school/organisation informs parents about incidents and delivers appropriate sanctions WAYS TO PROTECTING YOURSELF
    55. 55. POSITIVE ONLINE IDENTITY
    56. 56. Reputation ADVICE Conversations about FOR YOUNG PEOPLE  “Remember what goes online stays online”  “When did you last check your privacy settings?”  “Can you help me check my settings”  “Are you changing your password regularly?”  “Do you know the best way to get offending material taken down?” FOR OUR STAFF  “Do we have an organisational policy on using social media with users ?”  Do we check regularly what people are saying about our service on social media ?  Do we promote ourselves positively on social media ?  Are we reaching our users through social media effectively?
    57. 57. UNDERSTANDING OUR RESPONSIBILITIES PART III “with great power comes....”
    58. 58. AN ABSENCE OF KNOWLEDGE IS NOT AN EXCUSE FOR AN ABSENCE OF RESPONSIBILITY AND CARE. WHAT IS POTENTIALLY CRIMINAL, HARMFUL, INAPPROPRIATE OR ILLEGAL OFFLINE, IS THE SAME ONLINE. ULTIMATELY THIS COMES DOWN TO OUR DUTY OF CARE & LEADERSHIP.
    59. 59. Policies Infrastructure Education Ongoing education & prevention programme which is targeted at both YP, parents and the whole work-force. Organisation E-safety policy, Acceptable Use Policy, Anti-Bullying policy, Mobile use policy Managed learning environment with high quality access and equipment which is filtered, monitored and supervised. PIE all 3 ‘legs’ are vital
    60. 60. Policies Need to be:  Owned -don’t simply cut and paste another  Updated for constantly changing technology  Obeyed – new staff, volunteers, sanctions ?  Monitored – are they effective, out of date?  Promoted – made accessible to all users
    61. 61. http://network.youthworkonline.org.uk/forum/topics/use-of-facebook-examples-of A few examples
    62. 62. Resources
    63. 63. Using social media Positively from Using social media for youth engagement can help organisations:  Reach young people where they already are spending hours a day connected to social networking platforms. Too often engagement opportunities are based on expecting young people to come to us, when we should go to where young people are.  Be found— as many young people turn to search engines to find or confirm information. If you’re not online and easy to find, you’re probably missing many opportunities for youth engagement.  Communicate with young people in familiar settings — using the same forms of media young people are comfortable interacting with. Social media tools make it easy to create rich multi-media communication that you can use to make ideas and opportunities accessible to young people.  Meet changing expectations as older methods of communication and participation lose ground in a social media-rich environment. Young people will expect media they can interact with.  Take advantage of networks to spread engagement opportunities— creating content and opportunities that young people can easily share with their friends through social media and social networking tools.
    64. 64. Ten top tips to managing social media in adoption* 1 Talk openly and honestly with your children about social media, contact issues and the risks involved. Then work together to come up with solutions. 2 Look at privacy settings so that your children’s profile can not be seen publicly, and also hide lists of ‘friends’. * From BAAF website Advice from Facing up to Facebook http://www.baaf.org.uk/ bookshop/book_fufa
    65. 65. 3 Explain to your children the risks involved in accepting random unknown people as ‘friends’. 4 Make sure they are not making public information that could help identify them, such as their date of birth or address. 5 Discuss the possibility of using a nickname online instead of their real name, perhaps even having an unusual spelling (e.g N1ck Sm1th)
    66. 66. 6 Avoid using profile pictures. Instead use the default pictures or something generic like flowers, landscapes, football team logos etc. 7 Children should be discouraged from posting any information about their school or local area 8 Don’t tag children in photos posted online, and ask friends and family to be aware of this also.
    67. 67. 9 Make sure your children are aware of the risks of joining groups or networks that identify where they live or go to school. 10 Make sure your children know how to ‘block’ people so that if they do receive unwanted contact it can be managed. See page 53
    68. 68. In the context of an inspection, e-safety may be described as the school’s ability: to protect and educate pupils and staff in their use of technology to have the appropriate mechanisms to intervene and support any incident where appropriate. What can we learn from schools ?
    69. 69. Assemblies, tutorial time, personal, social, health and education lessons, and an age-appropriate curriculum for e-safety Pupils were more vulnerable overall when schools used locked down systems because they were not given enough opportunities to learn how to assess and manage risk for themselves. In the outstanding schools, senior leaders, governors, staff and families worked together to develop a clear strategy for e-safety. Policies were reviewed regularly in the light of technological developments. The outstanding schools recognised that, relationships with families, needed to keep developing to support e-safety at home. Schools need to make good use of the views of pupils and their parents to develop their e-safety provision. WHAT DOES GOOD E-SAFETY LOOK LIKE?
    70. 70. REACHING PARENTS/CARERS “Parents and the home environment they create are the single most important factor in shaping their children’s well-being, achievements and prospects” Alan Johnson (when Education Secretary)
    71. 71. • Does the technology contribute to an erosion of empathy ? If so how ? • What happens when we become “comfortably numb” • How can we build empathy online ? EMPATHY
    72. 72. “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view. Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.” Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird
    73. 73. “Empathy is the ability to put ourselves in another’s place and to understand their experience. We are deeply present to their thoughts and feelings with such compassionate accuracy that they can hear their own thoughts more clearly. Empathy connect us with our common humanity. It protects us from prejudice, blame, and judgment – those things that divide us from each other. It moves us to seek justice for every person. Even those with whom we disagree.” With empathy, we reflect on how our actions affect others. Empathy inspires us to be giving and selfless. Empathy connects our hearts. Source www.boundlessconnections.org/weeklyvirtuesblog/wp-
    74. 74. “Empathy is the ability to put ourselves in another’s place and to understand their experience. We are deeply present to their thoughts and feelings with such compassionate accuracy that they can hear their own thoughts more clearly. Empathy connect us with our common humanity. It protects us from prejudice, blame, and judgment – those things that divide us from each other. It moves us to seek justice for every person. Even those with whom we disagree.” With empathy, we reflect on how our actions affect others. Empathy inspires us to be giving and selfless. Empathy connects our hearts. Source www.boundlessconnections.org/weeklyvirtuesblog/wp-
    75. 75. Risk Reputation Where to start ? Responsibility Our safety, conduct & risky behaviours Our privacy, security settings and our peer group Our leadership, ethical code and resilience
    76. 76. Responsibility Conversations aboutADVICE FOR YOUNG PEOPLE  “Have you come across any good social initiatives?”  “What advice do you need about using social media ?”  “I trust you to make good decisions, but I also need to learn from you.” FOR OUR STAFF  “Can we involve the YP we work with in developing our policy and practice ?”  “What expectations are we making for our staff in being online so much ?”  Are we pioneering new and imaginative ways of Educating and inspiring our younger users via social media ?
    77. 77. WHAT IS ONE THING YOU ARE GOING TO ACT UPON ? Risk Safety, conduct & risky behaviour Reputation Privacy, security settings and peer group Leadership, ethical code and resilience Responsibility
    78. 78. EVALUATION Please give feedback. 
    79. 79. Useful websites 1) UK law Enforcement agency and part of VGTF www.ceop.gov.uk 2) UK Council for Child Internet Safety www.dcsf.gov.uk/ukccis/ 3) Childnet International www.childnet.com/ including Cyberbullying film 4) British Association for Adoption and Fostering www.baaf.org.uk - including advice on Facebook
    80. 80. And Finally….
    81. 81. "The web is more a social creation than a technical one. I designed it for social effect - to help people work together - and not as a technical toy…. The ultimate goal of the web is to support and improve our web like existence in the world...... Tim Berners-Lee ‘Weaving the Web’ 1999 We have to ensure that the society we build with the web is the sort we intend.”
    82. 82. • Questions about anything which has come up today ?
    83. 83. THANK YOU ! www.carrick-davies.com stephen@carrick-davies.com Complete Evaluation forms MUNCH PING POKE! See my current work re social media and vulnerable yp on my website

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