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Pwc emerging-mhealth-chart-pack Pwc emerging-mhealth-chart-pack Presentation Transcript

  • Emerging mHealth:paths for growth7 June 2012
  • Contents 1 Executive summary 2 mHealth maturity scorecard 3 Key findings 4 Country breakdown of key data 5 Key global contactsPwC 2
  • 1. Executive SummaryPwC 3
  • Executive summary Goal of the report • Report assesses the market opportunities and challenges for mHealth from the perspective of patients, payers, and providers • EIU report, commissioned by PwC, with analysis from PwC Key findings • Expectations are high for mHealth from patients, providers and payers • Significant differences in adoption among emerging and developed nations • Consumers are ready to adopt mobile health faster than the health industry is ready to adapt • Solutions, not technology, are the key to successPwC 4
  • About the researchReport surveys covered patients, physicians and payers 1 A patient survey with over 1,000 respondents— with a broad distribution of economic backgrounds, ages, levels of education and states of health A physicians survey with 433 physicians — public and private sector, urban vs. rural, 2 wide range of years in experience A payer survey with 345 respondents — roughly evenly divided between public and 3 private sector and 55% are C-suite or above 4 20 in-depth interviews with key expertsThe survey included 10 countries:Brazil China Denmark Germany India South Spain Turkey UK US AfricaPwC 5
  • 2. mHealth readiness scorecardPwC 6
  • mHealth scorecard methodology• Provides an overview of the countries surveyed and the maturity of their mHealth market through four key pillars. Each pillar is further divided into eight dimensions to support the findings• Survey questions are grouped into the eight dimensions• Each country receives a score per pillar and dimension, and an overall score Overall Score - Maturity of the market Four Pillars 2. Regulatory, 1. Awareness and reimbursement and 3. Technology 4. Impact openness for mHealth business model Eight Dimensions 1.1 Encouraging 2.1 Reimbursement 3.1 Access and 4.1 Institutional environment and business model security 2.2 Encouraging 1.2 Current use of 3.2 Interoperability 4.2 Healthcare system regulatory and legal mHealth environmentPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 7
  • The scorecard is based on the survey of patients, physiciansand patients and scores from 10 (mature) to 1 (immature)1 2 3 4 Dimension 5 Pillar and Scorecard Normalisation Data analysis score overall score framework of data calculation calculation Apply scorecard Collect and Normalise data Calculate the Calculate the framework analyse data on a scale of 1 to scores for each score for the about the from 10, with 10 of the eight four pillars and mHealth • doctor/payer being the most dimensions the overall market based survey mature score on eight • patient survey dimensions • expert interviewsPwC 8
  • Emerging markets lead the way in mHealth, followed by theUS as the most mature marketOverall score 6.6 6.5 6.3 5.7 5.6 5.6 5.5 5.3 5.2 5.1 6.2 8.2 6.2 6.5 4.3 3.8 6.9 5.1 4.4 2.4 6.5 4.7 3.4 5.1 6.6 5.1 8.1 4.1 6.3 7.6 6.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 3.6 6.6 6.1 5.1 7.3 6.6 7.8 6.8 7.8 6.0 5.6 4.8 5.4 3.8 2.6 3.4 South India Brazil US Spain China Germany UK Turkey Denmark Africa Awareness and openness for mHealth 10 most mature Regulatory environment, reimbursement and business model Technology 1 immature ImpactPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 9
  • First pillar: Awareness and openness for mHealthDetailed scores 6.0 7.8 5.7 7.8 5.6 6.8 5.2 6.0 5.1 5.6 5.1 5.4 5.0 4.8 4.8 3.8 4.7 3.4 4.7 2.6 7.6 9.2 5.9 4.8 4.5 5.6 4.5 4.5 2.6 7.9 6.4 7.7 7.3 6.8 1.9 5.2 5.1 3.0 4.2 3.3 India China Brazil South Spain Turkey Germany US Denmark UK Africa 10 most mature Encouraging environment Current use of mHealth 1 immature • The emerging markets score high in doctors encouraging patients to use mHealth as well as patients using mHealth solutions • The most established mHealth market today, the US, scores very low in awareness and openness of mHealth. The same could be said of the UK. Reasons may be due to physicians who are already using mHealth are more aware of its possible drawbacksPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 10
  • Second pillar: Regulatory environment, reimbursementand business modelDetailed scores 6.0 7.5 5.7 7.5 5.6 7.4 5.2 7.3 5.1 6.6 5.1 6.6 5.0 6.4 4.8 6.1 4.7 5.1 4.7 3.6 6.9 8.5 6.7 8.6 7.2 6.1 5.3 6.1 5.5 3.0 8.1 6.6 8.2 5.9 5.9 7.1 7.5 6.0 4.7 4.2 South Spain Brazil UK Germany Denmark India Turkey US China Africa 10 most mature Reimbursement and business model Encouraging regulatoryand legal environment 1 immature • Developed and emerging countries have no significant differences on reimbursement, and the regulatory and legal environment • According to survey respondents, too few proven business models and an unsupportive regulatory environment are key barriers to mHealth • China’s score is the lowest for both dimensions in this pillar, with 83% indicating there are too few proven business models (survey average is 64%)PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 11
  • Third pillar: TechnologyDetailed scores 6.0 8.1 5.7 7.6 5.6 6.6 5.2 6.5 5.1 6.3 5.1 5.1 5.0 5.1 4.8 4.7 4.7 4.1 4.7 3.4 9.0 9.4 7.7 5.1 6.0 5.5 5.2 2.3 4.9 1.7 7.3 5.7 5.5 7.8 6.5 7.2 4.7 5.0 3.3 5.2 Denmark US Germany South UK Spain Turkey Brazil China India Africa 10 most mature Access and security Interoperability 1 immature • In technology, the developed markets e.g., US, Denmark or Germany are ahead • The higher smartphone penetration, a much higher emphasis on interoperability with existing systems, as well as a more advanced access and security features lead to a perception of high readiness for mHealth from a technological point of viewPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 12
  • Fourth pillar: ImpactDetailed scores 6.0 8.2 5.7 6.9 5.6 6.5 5.2 6.2 5.1 6.2 5.1 5.1 5.0 4.4 4.8 4.3 4.7 3.8 4.7 2.4 7.2 5.9 5.9 6.0 7.0 4.6 4.2 4.2 3.9 9.1 7.9 7.1 2.3 6.4 5.4 5.5 4.6 4.4 3.7 2.4 India China US South Brazil UK Turkey Spain Germany Denmark Africa 10 most mature Impact on institution Impact on Healthcare system 1 immature • The emerging markets and the US score high in this pillar • The impact on institutions is measured by the expected impact on medical care, on the relationships with patients and on internal operations. For example, 92% of physicians in India expected a noticeable effect of mHealth in 3 years. In Denmark, only 80% believe this is the case • The impact on healthcare can be illustrated by the following figure: 52% of physicians in India believe the widespread adoption of mHealth is inevitable, vs. 34% in DenmarkPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 13
  • 3. Top ten findings of the surveyPwC 14
  • Finding #1 – mHealth could enable a disruptive move fromdoctor-directed care towards a more personalised,consumer- oriented model 46% Patients believe that mHealth offers them convenient access to providers as well as the possibility to reduce their own healthcare costs Driver for patients of surveyed 50% Reduce own healthcare costs Convenient access to provider 40% patients expect Access to a greater choice of applications 30% Ability to obtain information more 20% 10% convenient Access better quality healthcare 0% Encouragement from my healthcare provider access to healthcare Manage a particular medical Encouragement from my condition healthcare payer providers Manage aspects of my life from my mobile phone Greater control over own health through mHealth DriversPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 15
  • Finding #2 – Patients with health issues are most likely touse mHealth products and services Patients with chronic diseases like diabetes are better 82% informed about mHealth, more likely to be using mHealth services and more likely to pay for them mHealth adoption for patients with chronic diseases vs. survey average of patients with 100% 82% poorly 80% 74% 79% 72% 68% 62% 64% managed 60% 49% 47% conditions 40% engage in some 20% sort of mHealth 0% (vs. 64% Familarity with term mHealth Engage in mHealth Currently use 1 or more apps survey Survey average Patients with poorly managed conditions average) Healthcare spending >30% of incomePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 16
  • Finding #3 – Patients are highly price sensitive, mainlybecause they think healthcare payers should bear thecosts Patients in emerging markets are willing to pay more 20% than those in developed ones – likely reflecting the higher proportion of all healthcare costs they have to pay themselves Patients willingness to pay 60%of patients inemerging 44%countries would 40% 33%pay more than 27% 30%$5 annually 20% 20% 20%for an mHealth 16% 10%service, vs. 10%in developed 0% Nothing Up to $1 per year Between $1-$5 per year More than $5 per yearcountries Developed countries Emerging countriesPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 17
  • (1 of 2)Finding #4 – Payers and – to a lower extent physicians –see the potential for improving quality of care andreduced costs... Payers seem more optimistic about the potential for 40% mHealth in promoting better health through greater patient involvement in care and reduced healthcare costs Drivers for physicians and Payers of payers Lower overall cost of care for encourage patients Reduction in administrative 40% 30% Easier access to care Reach previously unreachable patients to time for medical personnel 20% patients monitor their Encouragement by regulators 10% Improved quality of care condition 0% through Ubiquity of smartphones More efficient internal processes mHealth Opportunity to provide new services Patient expectations/demand (vs. 25% of Expectation of medical personnel physicians) Medical Doctor PayersPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 18
  • (2 of 2)Finding #4 – … but physicians are concerned thatmHealth will make patients too independent Patients are aware of this reluctance among physicians. 44% 60% of active users of mHealth say that patients and technology companies are more interested in mHealth than physicians Barriers for physicians and payers of physicians Other areas needing Existing reimbursement are worried investment 40% 30% structure Lack of information on that mHealth mHealth 20% Lack of compatibility will make Culture of medical 10% patients too 0% Lack of evidence professionals independent Privacy and security issues Lack of necessary technology Lack of interest by key users Regulatory and legal barriers Medical Doctor PayersPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 19
  • Finding #5 – Payers are more likely to cover mHealthservices than physicians are to provide them Physicians frequently cite existing payment structures as 70% a barrier to their greater deployment of mHealth yet reimbursement seems to be less an issue among payers than expected Services doctor plan to offer and payer 100% plan to pay for in the next three yearsof payers plan 83% 80%to pay for 65% 71% 67% 69% 68%68% 73% 69% 66% 70% 61%mobile access to 60% 55% 47%EMR in the next 40%three years, butonly 55% of 20%physicians plan 0%to offer this Text-based Telephone Administrative consultations consultations comm. Drug adherence Remote Patient Monitoring General health Access EMR data remotelyservice Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to pay forPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 20
  • (1 of 2)Finding #6 – Emerging markets will lead the way inmHealth mHealth is less disruptive to healthcare in emerging 61% markets because for a majority, it is not a substitution to care but rather the only access High patient expectations in emerging countries: mHealth will change how… 80% of surveyed patients in 60% emerging 40% markets are aware of term 20% “mobile health” (vs. 37% in 0% I seek Providers I manage I measure I manage my I manage any I Providers information send me overall health and share my medication chronic communicate monitor my developed on health issues general information vital health data conditions with my condition and provider compliance markets) Developed markets Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 Emerging marketsPwC 21
  • (2 of 2)Finding #6 – Emerging markets will lead the way inmHealth More mHealth services are covered by payers in 43% emerging markets than in developed countries Services payers have already begun to pay for 50%of payers in 45% 43% 38% 39% 40% 37%emerging 35% 34% 33% 35%markets pay or 30% 29% 25% 24%plan to pay for 25% 21% 23% 23% 23% 20%telephone 15%consultations 10%(vs. 29% in 5% 0%developed Telephone Video Text based Administrative consultations consultations consultations comm. Remote Patient General health Access EMR data remotelymarkets) Developed markets Monitoring Emerging marketsPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 22
  • (1 of 2)Finding #7 – A tale of two countries – India and the UK For India, mHealth address pressing healthcare needs; 0.6 for the UK, it is an added luxury Drivers for patients 70%physicians per 60%1,000 50%inhabitants are 40%practicing in 30%India (vs. 2.2 20%per 1,000 in the 10%UK) 0% Reduce own Convenient Ability to obtain Greater control Access better Encouragement Encouragement healthcare costs access to information over own health quality from my from healthcare provider healthcare healthcare payer provider India UKPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 23
  • (2 of 2)Finding #7 – A tale of two countries – India and the UK Lower cost for patients is the leading driver of mHealth 88% in India, whereas the reduction of administrative time is a leading concern of physicians in the UK with the NHS system. Drivers for physicians and payers Lower overall cost of care of India Reduction in for patients 50% administrative time for Easier access to care respondents do medical personnel 40% 30% engage in Encouragement by regulators 20% Reach previously unreachable patients mHealth 10% 0% activity Ubiquity of smartphones Improved quality of care (vs. just 52% Opportunity to provide More efficient internal new services processes of UK Expectation of medical Patient personnel expectations/demand respondents) India UKPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 24
  • (1 of 2)Finding #8 – Focus on solutions, not technology To create real value and identify business models, 64% companies must focus on solutions that address the needs of stakeholders (payer, provider, patients) directly Exciting possibilities, but too few business modelsof physicians 6%and payers saymHealth hasexciting 30%possibilities buttoo few proven 64%business models Agree Neither agree or disagree DisagreePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 25
  • (2 of 2)Finding #8 – Focus on solutions, not technology Immense high dropout rates illustrates the need for 48% engaging, integrated, interoperable, and intelligent apps Example for PwC Six Success principles: WellDoc Diabetes manager Integrated Socialized • Integrated into existing • Improves treatment and healthcare plans, personal medication while providing of surveyed lifestyles, and clinical process • Utilizes multiple technologies personal coaching, direct physician support, and caregiver linkage patients who Interoperability • Incorporated into Allscripts have used an electronic health record system Outcome Oriented • Enables data from app to be • Demonstrated clinical success accessed by physicians through in trials mHealth app EHR • Demonstrated economic success in the reduction of Intelligent discontinued it • App provides real time alerts and intelligent guidance for health care costs after the first users based on data inputted • Doctors receive clear, Engaging • Patients can configure settings, actionable data that they can six months use as a basis for recommendations messaging, tonality, and interaction modesPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 26
  • Finding #9 – Technology still presents challenges formHealth adopters Lack of interoperability, standards and integration into 47% existing IT-systems impedes uptake of the fragmented mHealth market mHealth services used by physicians/ payers integrated into... of surveyed 60% 53% physicians say that mHealth 40% 37% applications 27% they use will 20% 23% 15% not work with their organisation’s 0% IT systems of my IT systems of local IT system of the organisation hospitals and national healthcare IT systems accessible by Health data systems that IT clinics system colleagues in other patients can access organisations directlyPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 27
  • Finding #10 – Regulators could encourage advances inmHealth, but the survey shows otherwise Surveyed physicians and payers see little encouragement 45% for mHealth by regulators, due to regulatory and legal barriers mHealth advances are being held up by regulation created for older technologies that does not translate well to newer ones of physicians 12% and payers think mHealth 45% advances are held up by 43% regulation Agree Neither agree or disagree DisagreePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 28
  • 4. Country breakdownPwC 29
  • (1 of 2)Overview of key data Expectation of physicians and healthcare payers1 11% Agree about the widespread adoption of mHealth 33% 56% Neither agree or disagree Disagree Services physicians would like to offer and payers Services physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years2 plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years 100% 80% 60% 49% 59% 69% 70% 74% 60% 91% 65% 66% 80% 71% 65% 60% 78% 51% 75% 40% 20% 0% Text based Telephone Video Administrative Drug Remote General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. adherence Patient data remotely Monitoring Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimburse Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients Patients Brazil Emerging countries (excl. Brazil)3 Drivers Barriers and physicians (including average of the peer group) Reduce own healthcare 52% Cost 55% costs 54% 48% Convenient access to 34% Lack of relevant 36% provider 52% applications 39% Access better quality 29% Lack of knowledge 31% healthcare 22% about services 44% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% Doctor Drivers Barriers Easier access to care 49% Lack of compatibility 40% 28% 24% 31% Privacy and security 37% Patient expectations/demand 35% 25% issues Reach previously unreachable 31% Culture of medical 37% patients 32% professionals 29% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60%PwC 30
  • (1 of 2)Brazil - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 11% Agree Neither agree or 33% disagree 56% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 91% 74% 80% 78% 75% 80% 69% 70% 65% 66% 71% 65% 59% 60% 60% 60% 49% 51% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug Remote General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. adherence Patient data remotely Monitoring Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 31
  • (2 of 2) Brazil - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians Brazil Emerging countries (excl. Brazil) Patients Drivers Barriers Reduce own healthcare 52% 55% costs 54% Cost 48% Convenient access to 34% Lack of relevant 36% provider 52% applications 39% Access better quality 29% Lack of knowledge 31% healthcare 22% about services 44% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% Physicians Drivers Barriers Easier access to care 49% 40% 28% Lack of compatibility 24%Patient expectations/demand 31% Privacy and security 37% 25% issues 35%Reach previously unreachable 31% Culture of medical 37% patients 32% professionals 29% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 32
  • (1 of 2)China - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 5% 15% Agree Neither agree or disagree Disagree 80%Services physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years120% 100% 100% 97% 97%100% 89% 97% 90% 91% 85% 89% 97% 81% 94% 77% 80% 69% 67% 60% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 33
  • (2 of 2)China - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patientsand physicians China Emerging countries (excl. China)Patients Drivers BarriersConvenient access to provider 45% 35% 49% Cost 53% Reduce own healthcare costs 36% Lack of relevant 31% 58% applications 40% Ability to obtain information 31% Lack of knowledge 28% 30% about services 45% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60%Physicians Drivers Barriers More efficient internal 44% Existing reimbursement 49% processes 26% structure 25% 38% Lack of necessary 38% Improved quality of care 34% 27% technologyReduction in administrative 33% Privacy and security 38%time for medical personnel 27% issues 34% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60%PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 34
  • (1 of 2)Denmark - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 7% Agree 30% Neither agree or disagree 63% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 84% 80% 71% 58% 65% 58% 60% 58% 60% 55% 58% 60% 48% 45% 49% 48% 40% 42% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 35
  • (2 of 2) Denmark - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians Denmark Developed countries (excl. Denmark) Patients Drivers Barriers 33% Cost 47% Ability to obtain information 27% 48% Access better quality 30% Lack of knowledge 47% healthcare 25% about services 39% Reduce own healthcare 29% Lack of relevant 36% costs 35% applications 30% 0% 20% 40% 0% 20% 40% 60%Physicians Drivers BarriersReach previously unreachable 42% Regulatory and legal 44% patients 21% barriers 23% 33% Lack of information on 42% Easier access to care 27% 33% mHealth 31% Culture of medical 36% Improved quality of care 22% 44% professionals 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 36
  • (1 of 2)Germany - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 13% 33% Agree Neither agree or disagree Disagree 53%Services physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 77% 80% 80% 70% 67% 71% 70% 70% 63% 61% 61% 50% 55% 60% 39% 40% 31% 25% 27% 20% 0% Text based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 37
  • (2 of 2) Germany - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians Germany Developed countries (excl. Germany) Patients Drivers Barriers Reduce own healthcare 41% Lack of knowledge 46% costs 32% about services 39% Greater control over own 39% Cost 40% health 30% 50% Access better quality 31% Privacy or security 38% healthcare 27% concerns 25% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% Physicians Barriers Drivers Reduction in administrative 42% Privacy and security 47% time for medical personnel 32% issues 36% 33% Existing reimbursement 40% Improved quality of care structure 28% 43% 31% Lack of necessary 31%Patient expectations/demand technology 30% 24% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 38
  • (1 of 2)India - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 9% Agree 31% Neither agree or disagree 60% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 85% 83% 83% 78% 80% 75% 73% 73% 79% 73% 73% 71% 77% 73% 77% 77% 65% 60% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 39
  • (2 of 2) India - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians India Emerging countries (excl. India) Patients Drivers Barriers 58.00% Cost 53% Reduce own healthcare costs 52% 48% 55.00% Lack of relevant 47% Convenient access to provider 47% applications 36% 40.00% My provider is unwilling 36% Ability to obtain information 28% to work with mHealth 19% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60% Physicians Drivers BarriersLower overall cost of care for 42% Lack of interest by key 37.50% patients 23% users 19%Reach previously unreachable 40% Culture of medical 33.30% patients 29% professionals 29% Reduction in administrative 35% Lack of information on 33.3 % time for medical personnel 26% mHealth 27% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 40
  • (1 of 2)South Africa - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 19% Agree Neither agree or disagree 23% 59% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 83% 83% 76% 76% 76% 70% 80% 58% 58% 60% 61% 60% 50% 52% 58% 50% 58% 38% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 41
  • (2 of 2) South Africa - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians South Africa Emerging countries (excl. South Africa) Patients Drivers Barriers Lack of knowledge about 82% 71% Reduce own healthcare costs services 34% 46% Cost 55% 53% Convienient access to provider 47% 48% Privacy or security Greater control over own 42% 39% concerns 27% health 30% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Physicians Drivers BarriersLower overall cost of care for 38% Privacy and security 45% patients 24% issues 36% 33% Culture of medical 41% Easier access to care 29% 31% professionalsReach previously unreachable 33% Lack of information on 31% patients 31% mHealth 28% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 42
  • (1 of 2)Spain - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 12% Agree Neither agree or 53% disagree 35% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 84% 87% 84% 80% 80% 69% 69% 71% 66% 58% 60% 63% 62% 62% 62% 60% 51% 51% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 43
  • (2 of 2)Spain - Top 3 drivers and barriers forpatients and physicians Spain Developed countries (excl. Spain)Patients Drivers Barriers Convenient access to 47% Cost 58% provider 44% 45% Access better quality 38% Lack of relevant 32% healthcare 25% applications 31% Greater control over own 33% Lack of knowledge 32% health 31% about services 42% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80%Physicians Drivers Barriers 58% Culture of medical 36% Improved quality of care 22% 37% professionals 49% Lack of information on 33% Easier access to care 29% 29% mHealth More efficient internal 38% Privacy and security 33% processes 26% issues 39% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60%PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 44
  • (1 of 2)Turkey - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 13% Agree Neither agree or disagree 31% 56% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 87% 76% 76% 80% 63% 59% 64% 62% 63% 65% 61% 62% 61% 55% 61% 60% 45% 50% 40% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 45
  • (2 of 2) Turkey - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians Turkey Emerging countries (excl. Turkey) Patients Drivers Barriers Convenient access to 53% Cost 50% provider 47% 49% Reduce own healthcare 40% Lack of relevant 40% costs 57% applications 38% Greater control over own 40% Lack of knowledge 36% health 31% about services 43% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% Physician Drivers BarriersReach previously unreachable 34% Lack of necessary 44.7 % patients 31% technology 32% More efficient internal 29% Regulatory and legal 28.90% processes 31% barriers 18% 26% Other areas needing 26.30%Patient expectations/demand 17% 26% investment 0% 20% 40% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 46
  • (1 of 2)United Kingdom - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 5% Agree 36% Neither agree or disagree 59% DisagreeServices physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 82% 91% 80% 69% 71% 69% 66% 54% 51% 59% 60% 60% 51% 52% 46% 40% 33% 27% 26% 20% 0% Text based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 47
  • (2 of 2) United Kingdom - Top 3 drivers and barriers for patients and physicians UK Developed countries (excl. UK) Patients Drivers Barriers Convenient access to 49% Cost 50% provider 44% 48% Greater control over own 43% Lack of knowledge 44% health 29% about services 40% 27% Lack of relevant 28%Ability to obtain information 26% applications 32% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60%Physicians Drivers Barriers Improved quality of care 40% Lack of interest by key 33% 42% users 18%Patient expectations/demand 36% Privacy and security 33% 23% issues 39% Reduction in administrative 36% Lack of necessary 33% time for medical personnel 34% technology 29% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 48
  • (1 of 2)United States - Potential and servicesWidespread adoption of mHealth services in my country is inevitable in the near future 0% 30% Agree Neither agree or disagree Disagree 70%Services physicians would like to offer and payers plan to reimburse for in the next 3 years100% 72% 66% 74% 77% 80% 69% 68% 56% 60% 54% 58% 54% 55% 58% 60% 44% 40% 23% 26% 20% 0% Text-based Telephone Video Administrative Drug adherence Remote Patient General health Access EMR consultations consultations consultations comm. Monitoring data remotely Doctors plan to offer Payers plan to reimbursePwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 49
  • (2 of 2)United States - Top 3 drivers and barriersfor patients and physicians US Developed countries (excl. US)Patients Drivers Barriers Reduce own healthcare 53% Cost 46% costs 28% 49% Convenient access to 50% Lack of knowledge 35% provider 43% about services 42% 25% Own not a mobile device 28%Ability to obtain information 28% 13% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60%Physicians Drivers Barriers 44% Existing reimbursement 49% Improved quality of care 26% 41% structureReduction in administrative 42% Privacy and security 44%time for medical personnel 33% issues 37% Easier access to care 33% Lack of evidence 31% 33% 20% 0% 20% 40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60%PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 50
  • 5. Global contactsPwC 51
  • Global contactsDavid Levy MDGlobal Healthcare Leader+1 646 471 1070david.l.levy@us.pwc.comChristopher Wasden, EdDGlobal Healthcare Innovation Leader+1 646 471 6090christopher.wasden@us.pwc.comDan DiFilippoGlobal Technology, Communications and Entertainment & Media Leader+1 646 471 8426dan.difilippo@us.pwc.comPierre-Alain SurGlobal Communications Industry leader+1 501 907 8085pierre-alain.sur@us.pwc.comPwC 52
  • AppendixPwC 53
  • mHealth scorecard – Detailed scores per dimension South Ger-Area Africa India Brazil US many Spain China Denmark Turkey UKOverall Score 6.0 5.7 5.6 5.2 5.1 5.1 5.0 4.8 4.7 4.7Awareness and openness 5.5 7.0 6.2 3.5 4.4 5.1 7.0 3.1 4.9 2.4Encouraging environment 6.6 7.1 7.0 2.8 4.7 6.1 5.8 3.9 4.8 3.0Current use 4.3 6.9 5.3 4.2 4.1 4.1 8.3 2.4 5.0 1.8Regulatory environment, re-imbursement and business model 6.8 5.8 6.7 4.6 5.9 6.8 3.3 6.0 5.5 6.6Reimbursement and business model 7.3 6.8 7.4 4.2 5.3 6.0 3.9 6.4 5.4 5.4Encouraging regulatory environment 6.3 4.9 6.0 5.0 6.5 7.6 2.8 5.6 5.5 7.7Technology 5.9 3.2 4.3 6.8 6.0 4.6 3.7 7.3 4.6 5.7Access and security 7.1 4.8 6.5 5.2 5.0 4.3 3.0 6.6 4.6 5.9Interoperability 4.7 1.6 2.2 8.5 6.9 5.0 4.5 8.1 4.7 5.5Impact 6.0 6.6 6.0 5.3 4.2 2.9 5.9 4.0 3.8 4.0Impact on institution 6.5 6.7 6.7 4.3 4.7 3.7 6.4 4.0 3.8 3.9Impact on Healthcare system 5.4 6.5 5.3 6.3 3.6 2.2 5.4 3.9 3.9 4.2PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 54
  • Questions per dimension 1 Awareness and openness1.1 Encouraging environment Doctors encouraging patients to adopt a range of mHealth applications and services Patients expecting that mHealth applications/services will improve the quality of healthcare they receive in the next 3 years. Patients expecting that mHealth applications/services will make healthcare substantially more convenient in the next 3 years Percentage of patients familiar with the terms “mobile health” or “mHealth” Percentage of patients who would be interested in using mHealth applications/services Patients who are willing to pay more than $5 annually for a service - median from a set of services1.2 Current use Patients using mHealth services to manage their personal healthcare Doctors using mHealth services in managing their personal healthcare Doctors who use mobile internet at work to provide healthcare Doctors who have begun to offer services via mobile devices 2 Regulatory environment, reimbursement and business model2.1 Reimbursement and business model Doctors who say that existing payment structures for health services discourage them from taking advantage of potential efficiencies in mHealth Doctors who say that today’s mHealth market has exciting possibilities but too few proven business models Patients willing to pay annually for an application/service more than $5 Patients expecting that mHealth applications/services will substantially reduce their overall healthcare costs in the next 3 years2.2 Regulatory and legal environment Doctors believing mHealth advances are being held up by regulation created for older technologies that does not translate well to newer ones Payers who say that the regulatory and legal framework are leading barriers to greater adoption of mHealth applications or services Providers who say that the regulatory and legal framework are leading barriers to greater adoption of mHealth applications or servicesPwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 55
  • Questions per dimension (cont.) 3 Technology3.1 Access and security Doctors with access to mobile internet at work Percentage of doctors considering their internet access at work very secure Mobile penetration rate (Source: ITU)3.2 Interoperability Patients frustrated by incompatibilities of mHealth solutions Organisations that are reluctant to invest heavily in mHealth until the technology becomes more standardised, or interoperable 4 Impact4.1 Institutional Doctors expecting a noticeable effect on their medical care from mHealth - Currently Doctors expecting a noticeable effect on their medical care from mHealth - In three years Doctors expecting a positive impact on relationships with patients Doctors expecting a positive impact on internal operations4.2 Healthcare Patients who are expecting little effect on healthcare through mHealth Patients who are expecting mHealth services will improve a great deal in the next three years Patients who are considering mHealth as a more effective way to adopt healthier lifestyle Doctors expecting inevitable widespread adoption of mHealth applications and services is in the near future (6)PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 56
  • Detailed results of drivers and barriers for patientsDrivers Drivers Total Reduce own healthcare costs 444 43.2 % Convenient access to provider 477 46.4 % Ability to obtain information 289 28.1 % Encouragement from my healthcare provider 153 14.9 % Encouragement from healthcare payer 123 12.0 % Greater control over my own health 329 32.0 % Manage aspects of my life from my mobile phone 104 10.1 % Manage a particular medical condition 149 14.5 % Access to better quality healthcare 261 25.4 % Access to a greater choice of applications 97 9.4 % Other 32 3.1 % Total 1027 100.0 %Barriers Barriers Total Cost 498 48.5 % Lack of relevant applications 357 34.8 % My providers are unwilling to work with mHealth 190 18.5 % Privacy or security concerns 295 28.7 % Lack of knowledge about services 419 40.8 % Inconvenience and time involved in setting up mHealth 117 11.4 % Already satisfied with current possibilities 124 12.1 % Incompatible mHealth applications/services therefore takes more time to set up mHealth 92 9.0 % Difficulties understanding the content of services 104 10.1 % Don’t own a mobile device 134 13.0 % Other 17 1.7 % Total 1027 100.0 %PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 57
  • Detailed results of drivers and barriers for physiciansDrivers Drivers Total Lower overall cost of care for patients 109 25.2 % Easier access to care 140 32.3 % Reach previously unreachable patients 122 28.2 % Improved quality of care 154 35.6 % More efficient internal processes 126 29.1 % Patient expectations/demand 112 25.9 % Expectation of medical personnel 57 13.2 % Opportunity to provide new services 75 17.3 % Ubiquity of smartphones 69 15.9 % Encouragement by regulators 60 13.9 % Reduction in administrative time for medical personnel 137 31.6 % Other, please specify 2 0.5 % Total 433 100.0 %BarriersBarriers TotalOther areas needing investment 83 19.2 %Existing reimbursement structure 132 30.5 %Lack of compatibility 111 25.6 %Lack of evidence 96 22.2 %Lack of necessary technology 140 32.3 %Regulatory and legal barriers 103 23.8 %Lack of interest by key users 96 22.2 %Privacy and security issues 159 36.7 %Culture of medical professionals 118 27.3 %Lack of information on mHealth 126 29.1 %Other, please specify 5 1.2 %Total 433 100.0 %PwC Source: PwC analysis based on EIU research, 2012 58
  • © 2012 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership. All rightsreserved.PwC refers to the US member firm, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Eachmember firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details.This content is for general information purposes only, and should not be used as a substitutefor consultation with professional advisors.© 2012 The Economist Intelligence Unit Ltd. All rights reserved.Whilst efforts have been taken to verify the accuracy of this information, neither The EconomistIntelligence Unit Ltd. nor its affiliates can accept responsibility or liability for reliance by anyperson on this information.