MissouriACT Incorporating E-communications: Noel-Levitz

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A summary of 2013 E-expectations Survey results presented at the annual Missouri ACT meeting.

A summary of 2013 E-expectations Survey results presented at the annual Missouri ACT meeting.

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  • Geyer
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  • GeyerEqually divided among four geographic regions in the continental United States.
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  • GeyerMost respondents also visit college Web sites on a regular basis, with seniors visiting more frequently than juniors. At the time of the survey, 65 percent of senior respondents said they visited a college Web site within the past week, with 16 percent replying that they had visited a site that very day. For juniors, 54 percent had visited a site that week and 8 percent on that day. Nine of out ten respondents in both classes visited college Web sites within the past month.
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  • MerkerNot only did eight of ten respondents express a preference for using a PC or laptop for college Web sites, but nearly one third of respondents who browsed exclusively using mobile devices also preferred looking at college Web sites on PCs or laptops. The important aspect to note is that students cited a preference for looking at college sites on a PC or laptop. As the next figure illustrates, while students may state a preference for using traditional desktop or laptop machines to browse college sites, most do visit college Web sites on their mobile devices.
  • MerkerIn addition, 47 percent of those who viewed campus sites on their mobile devices also reported doing so within the previous week when they were polled. This further suggests that while students may prefer to use PCs to visit college sites, many are viewing college Web sites regularly via mobile devices.
  • MerkerKeep in mind that 90 percent of the respondents in the E-Expectations group reported using smaller displays—smartphones, Web-enabled cell phones, and the iPod touch—to go online via mobile. Even with tablets growing in popularity among teens, smartphone-sized devices are used more frequently by students to view college sites. This makes the issue of adapting content to the display size that much more relevant to the mobile browsing of students during the college search process.
  • MerkerCampus-specific applications are another way for institutions to optimize the browsing experience for mobile users. Respondents showed great interest in these apps, but only one-fifth said they had downloaded such an app. Campus-specific applications drew high interest when students were asked about applications for the search process, as an app allowing students to “complete enrollment at a specific school” also polled highly.
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  • MerkerOffering mobile users a chance to request information is a very obvious opportunity all campus mobile sites should include. But what about allowing students to calculate potential scholarships or request a campus visit while browsing on their phones and tablets? These activities can engage students and encourage them to submit information that can help you maneuver them closer to enrollment. The opportunity to calculate cost and scholarships in particular seems like an ideal experience for the mobile user—who may be in a position to show the results to a parent or guardian nearby. Offering mobile application submissions can also provide a key opportunity to a prospective student who is ready to apply immediately, without having to switch browsing platforms.
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  • Warren, Geyer next (transition)
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  • GeyerTwo-thirds of students also said they checked their e-mail on their mobile devices at least once a week, with nearly half checking e-mail daily.
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Transcript

  • 1. All material in this presentation, including text and images, is the property of Noel-Levitz, LLC. Permission is required to reproduce this information. Incorporating E-Communications and the Latest Enrollment Technologies and Initiatives to Build and Shape the Student Body Presented by Stephanie Geyer Vice President for Web Strategy and Interactive Marketing Services March 27, 2013
  • 2. Finding answers since 2005 Visit any partner site to find the latest studies, including the 2013 E-expectations of Juniors and Seniors white paper and trend reports for our recent Net Price Calculator and International Student studies. E-Expectations Research
  • 3. E-expectations 2013: Focal Points Mobile Users and Your Web Resources E-communications Resources and Preferences Social Media Trends and Opportunities
  • 4. Telephone survey of 2,018 high school students • Facilitated in March and April 2013 • List source: National Research Center for College and University Admissions (NRCCUA) • 95% confidence interval • +/- 3% margin of error Methodology
  • 5. About the 2,018 Respondents *1 percent of respondents reported a grade average below C-level. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 6. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 7. Public schools still most popular choice ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 8. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 9. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 10. E-expectations 2013: Focal Points Mobile Users and Your Web Resources
  • 11. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 12. Access to mobile devices on the rise Corresponds to findings of the Pew Internet and American life study reporting that 78 percent of teens aged 14-17 own a cell phone. Up from 67% as reported in the 2012 E- expectations of High School Juniors and Seniors ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students. Pew Internet and American Life Project, Teens and Technology, 2013 http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-and-Tech/Main-Findings/Teens-and-Technology.aspx
  • 13. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 14. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 15. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 16. 47% of this group reported looking at a college or university site within a week of the date they were polled ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 17. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 18. Recommendation: Mobile users visiting your site will only increase. Consider adaptive/responsive approaches to enhancing their experience and mobile apps that can target specific user needs. See The 2013 State of Mobile & Responsive Web in Higher Ed at higheredexperts.com: • 68% of 174 campuses have a mobile strategy in place o 51% adaptive o 45% mobile o 31% app ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 19. What content do they first seek on a college site via mobile device? Juniors % of first content sought Seniors % of first content sought Academic programs/majors listing 73% Orientation details 67% Academic programs/major details 46% Academic programs/majors listing 61% Directory/contact list 46% Applications 48% Enrollment or admissions information 38% Enrollment or admissions information 43% Orientation details 38% Academic programs/major details 39% Links to social media 33% Cost 39% Financial aid 32% Financial aid 38% Cost 31% Course catalogs 31% Scholarships 29% Scholarships 30% Search 30% Athletic program 24% ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 20. Recommendation: Users are accessing your site throughout each stage of the enrollment process. Be sure they can find the right content at the right moment, even when they’re using a mobile device.
  • 21. There’s more interest than actual experience in completing forms on mobile devices Form type (mobile) Have completed Would complete Would NOT complete Request information 49% 59% 41% Calculate scholarships 46% 62% 38% Schedule visit 44% 67% 33% Calculate cost 41% 67% 33% Open house registration -- 67% 33% Register for class -- 62% 38% Apply online -- 50% 50% Register for live chat -- 43% 57% ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 22. Recommendation: Effective form completion and engagement opportunities for mobile users can help keep the flow of research and exploration moving forward. Follow a mobile user’s potential journey through your site and see where friction points might drive them away.
  • 23. E-expectations 2013: Focal Points E-communications Resources and Preferences
  • 24. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 25. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 26. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 27. Recommendation: E-communications can make a difference in the connections students develop with your institution. Layers of online resources and experiences help them connect with you on their own terms and in their own time.
  • 28. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 29. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 30. Recommendation: Experimenting with paid interactive marketing? Be sure you are using unique landing pages for each campaign, and that you’ve taken time to integrate each with your Web analytics system to maximize your ability to track users all the way through the engagement process.
  • 31. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 32. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 33. Recommendations: Students checking e-mail on a smartphone are not going to read the same way they will on a full-size PC or laptop screen. Your e- mail messages need to adapt to this reality. • Economize your e-mail copy as much as possible so mobile users won’t have to scroll through long lines of text. • Create designs that, while attractive, maximize the screen space of smaller displays. • Move calls to action up so they display before the fold or on the first scroll of a mobile display, and repeat the request at the end. • Test all of your messages on a variety of mobile platforms before deploying.
  • 34. Up from 60% in 2012 ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 35. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 36. Recommendations: Begin integrating text messages in your overall e-communications flow: • From individual counselors to individual or small groups of students • Blast messages to larger market segments, especially later in the funnel. • Be certain that you have opt-in records for all whom you include in these programs.
  • 37. E-expectations 2013: Focal Points Social Media Trends and Opportunities
  • 38. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 39. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 40. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 41. ©2013 Noel-Levitz, LLC. 2013 E-Expectations Report: The Impact of Mobile Browsing on the Online Behavior of College-Bound High School Students.
  • 42. Recommendation: • Twitter was the only social media asset to gain users. • Though Facebook appears to be losing some traction with traditional college-bound students, it is still worthwhile as a social media asset. Continue developing engaging content resources that link into inquiry forms, event registration, and other online assets that can help build your inquiry pool and engagement opportunities. • Build an editorial calendar to coordinate your social media posts with e-mail and print campaigns. • Use tools like Storify to aggregate posts and tweets and then repackage on your site.
  • 43. Questions?
  • 44. Recommendation Summary: • Optimize the mobile experience through adaptive design or through mobile sites. • Design with smaller displays in mind so that your Web pages, e-mails, and other electronic content look appealing on smartphones. • Add forms for mobile users beyond simple contact forms. • Get students to opt into as many communication streams as they want. • Put your best institutional face on your Web site. • Never stop researching your visitors.