Form criticalparalleltomatt.beatitudes

196 views

Published on

Published in: Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
196
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Form criticalparalleltomatt.beatitudes

  1. 1. A Series of Rabbinic Beatitudes From David Daube, The New Testament and Rabbinic Judaism (University of London: The Athone Press, 1956): 198.A) Blessed be he who spoke and the world existed, blessed be he.A) Blessed be he who was the maker of the world in the beginning. B) Blessed be he who speaks and does. B) Blessed be he who decrees and performs. C) Blessed be he who has mercy upon the earth. C) Blessed be he who has mercy upon his creatures. B) Blessed be he who pays a good reward to them who fear him. B) Blessed be he who lives forever and endures to eternity.A) Blessed be he who redeems and delivers, blessed be his name.D) Blessed are you, E) O Lord our God, King of the Universe, O God and merciful Father, F) praised by the mouth of people, F) lauded and glorified by the tongue of the loving ones and your servants. G) We will praise you, E) O Lord our God, F) with the songs of David, your servant. G) We will praise you, H) glorified by your great name forever and ever. E) O King, G) praised and H) glorified by your great name forever and ever.D) Blessed are you, E) O Lord, a King, F) extolled with G) praises.11I have changed the King James English in Daube’s original translation into modernAmerican English, thus primarily changing “thee” to “you” and omitting all “eth”endings on verbs, wherever these appeared. I have also tried to point outparallelism of lines by the use of letters of the alphabet and by indenting lines whichseem to be in parallel.

×